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Julie Rose

Julie Rose has been reporting for WFAE since January 2008, covering everything from political scandal and bank bailouts to homelessness and the arts.  She's a two-time winner of a national Edward R. Murrow Award for radio writing. Prior to WFAE, Julie reported for KCPW in Salt Lake City where she got her start in radio.  Before that, she was a nonprofit fundraiser and a public relations manager in the San Francisco Bay Area.  It took a few career changes, but Julie finally found her calling in public radio reporting because she gets paid to do what she does best – be nosy. She's a graduate of the communications program at Brigham Young University and contributes frequently to National Public Radio programs. 

  • In Charlotte, N.C., a secret bunker rests quietly below a radio station. Built in 1963, it was part of a federal network designed to provide emergency communications in case of a nuclear attack. With a new slew of potential threats to contend with, FEMA has revived the idea.
  • Many airports send their discarded french fries, burgers and Cinnabons to the landfill. But Charlotte Douglas International plans to transform that garbage into fertilizer for flower beds. All it needed was a couple of million red wiggler worms.
  • In a world of Facebook and TMZ, mug shots are as popular as ever. There are entire tabloids dedicated to the latest arrest snapshots. But in one North Carolina county, mugging too much for a mug shot can get you locked in a cell indefinitely.
  • Bank of America will release quarterly earnings on Wednesday, and once again, foreclosures will be part of the equation. The Charlotte-based bank's handling of the housing crash upset a lot of people. And yet, some of those closest to the foreclosure mess are softening toward the bank.
  • It's the holiday season, so it's no surprise that employees at Lickety Split Chocolate are hard at work. But this is no ordinary candy company. The CEO is 15 years old, and the other employees are even younger. But like any good entrepreneurs, these kids -- all from the Navajo tribe -- know a good business idea when they see it.