All Things Considered

Monday- Friday, 4:00-6:00pm

In-depth reporting that transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. 

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In a typical year, skiing and snowboarding in Vermont is a $1.6 billion industry. The state's largest ski association says closing early last season because of COVID-19 cost the state's resorts about $100 million. And as Vermont Public Radio's Nina Keck reports, that's why resorts are doing all they can to stay open this season.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKI GONDOLA HUMMING)

In the three years since the Harvey Weinstein story broke and the #MeToo movement took off, a new report finds that people working in Hollywood and the entertainment business say not enough has changed.

The Hollywood Commission, a nonprofit that works to eradicate harassment and discrimination, surveyed nearly 10,000 people in the entertainment industry nationwide. It found many are staying silent because they fear retaliation, or they don't believe people in positions of power will be held to account.

TONYA MOSLEY, HOST:

In a typical year, skiing and snowboarding in Vermont is a $1.6 billion industry. The state's largest ski association says closing early last season because of COVID-19 cost the state's resorts about $100 million. And as Vermont Public Radio's Nina Keck reports, that's why resorts are doing all they can to stay open this season.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKI GONDOLA HUMMING)

TONYA MOSLEY, HOST:

In a typical year, skiing and snowboarding in Vermont is a $1.6 billion industry. The state's largest ski association says closing early last season because of COVID-19 cost the state's resorts about $100 million. And as Vermont Public Radio's Nina Keck reports, that's why resorts are doing all they can to stay open this season.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKI GONDOLA HUMMING)

TONYA MOSLEY, HOST:

In a typical year, skiing and snowboarding in Vermont is a $1.6 billion industry. The state's largest ski association says closing early last season because of COVID-19 cost the state's resorts about $100 million. And as Vermont Public Radio's Nina Keck reports, that's why resorts are doing all they can to stay open this season.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKI GONDOLA HUMMING)

Last week, the House passed Savanna's Act, a bill that requires the Department of Justice to strengthen training, coordination, data collection and other guidelines related to cases of murdered or missing Native Americans. It aims to address the alarming number of cases involving Native women.

Former North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp first introduced the bill in 2017. It passed the Senate earlier this year and President Trump is expected to sign it into law.

President Trump has made no secret of his intentions regarding the U.S. Supreme Court and abortion rights. During a presidential debate in 2016, Trump vowed to appoint justices who'd vote to overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

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Concert halls and theaters are taking baby steps to reopen. The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., held its first in-person concert, A Time to Sing: An Evening with Renee Fleming and Vanessa Williams. NPR's Elizabeth Blair was there and has this postcard.

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An hour before the food distribution event began in Bethesda, Md., on a recent Friday, a long line of cars was already winding through the parking lot.

Volunteers from St. John's Episcopal Church worked to unpack boxes of bread, prepared meals and coffee — enough for the first 200 people to arrive. Nourish Now, a Maryland-based nonprofit food bank, provides food for the weekly events.

Waiting in his car, Peter Warner was sure to arrive early this time. Last week, the group ran out of meals within a half hour.

Lexington, Neb., is just one of the many rural communities that has long dealt with food insecurity, but the global pandemic both intensified need in the town of 11,000 residents and presented new challenges in getting people food.

Ja Nelle Pleasure never used to think twice about putting food on the table for her family.

In fact, the Pleasure family revolved around food. One of their favorite activities was to spin a globe, put a finger down and cook a dish from the country where it lands.

"It was a lot of fun because we got to eat all over the place, stuff that none of us would have dared try before, like silkworms," she says. "They really look disgusting and scary. ... But when you eat it, it tastes like popcorn."

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When schools closed in March because of the coronavirus pandemic, families who depended on their kids getting free or reduced-cost meals at school were left with a big challenge.

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After a Kentucky grand jury declined to charge any officers with the actual shooting of Breonna Taylor, protesters now want to see the court transcripts that led to this decision — and so does Gov. Andy Beshear, a Democrat who previously served as the state's attorney general.

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So far, the Creek Fire, the biggest single fire ever to burn in the state of California, is only 36% contained. Still, some residents are now allowed to return home as long as they have a quick evacuation plan because the fire is still unpredictable.

Copyright 2020 Boise State Public Radio News. To see more, visit Boise State Public Radio News.

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Pregnant women had mountains of concern at the beginning of the pandemic, and doctors didn't have many answers. Now, months after COVID-19 began sweeping across the globe, new studies and CDC reports are out.

While there is still much that is unknown, the picture is beginning to be more clear.

The predicted effects of a warming climate are increasingly visible in California: Five of the six largest wildfires in state history ignited in recent weeks, and the state clocked its hottest August on record.

In an effort to combat climate change, California Gov. Gavin Newsom already has set the goal of 100% zero-emission energy sources for the state's electricity by 2045.

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One of the Louisville police officers who barged into the apartment of Breonna Taylor has been indicted.

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