KVNF Regional Newscast

Weekdays at 8:00 a.m. & 5:50 p.m.

Tune in weekdays after Morning Edition and during All Things Considered for regional news from KVNF.

KVNF brings you regional news weekdays at 8 a.m. and 5:50 p.m. (You can also subscribe to the newscasts using the Podcast or RSS links)

KVNF news is always looking for leads. Let us know what's happening in your area, what issues you care about and what you'd like to hear us cover - email us at news@kvnf.org

    

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Luke Runyon

  • U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree selected from Ouray Ranger District
  • Norwood Parks & Rec will get CPW trails grant
  • Confirmed COVID case numbers continue to rise
  • KBUT: Crested Butte Town Trustees vote to paint Black Lives Matter on street downtown
  • Luke Runyon: Reservoirs proposed in Northern Colorado spark debate about lack of water

  

Wikimedia Commons

  • Leroux Creek Foods in Hotchkiss named COVID outbreak site
  • Conservation groups cheer federal distict court decision on Thompson Divide
  • Remembering Our Fallen memorial arrives in Montrose
  • Author Forrest Fenn dies
  • Trump admin to weaken habitat protections for endangered species
  • Shelley Schlender at KGNU: Fighting COVID in CU-Boulder dorms with wastewater surveillance

  • Gov. Polis announces more funding for organizations helping with pandemic relief
  • Montrose County provides grants to small businesses in Region 10
  • Montrose County applies for more marijuana enforcement funding
  • Colorado Outdoors project in Montrose makes progress on trail, river restoration and housing
  • Neighboring Idaho counties with different COVID-19 policies have very different hospitalization rates
  • College towns sound very different without marching bands for football

KVNF Regional Newscast: September 7, 2020

Sep 7, 2020

  • U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet (D-Colorado) explains the intent of his proposed legislation known as the RESTART Act, as over 1500 venues go on 'red alert' to raise awareness about the financial strain of the pandemic including the Paradise, Blue Sage, Sheridan Opera House, the Liberty, and Sherbino Theater locally
  • Long before COVID-19 arrived in Libby, Montana residents faced another attack on their lungs: asbestos

Lon&Queta/Creative Commons

With major wildfires in Colorado this summer and a hotter, drier climate predicted across the West, many of us are wondering what our beloved forests will look like in a few decades.

A new University of Colorado Boulder-led study offers a glimpse into the future, suggesting that when forests burn across the Southern Rocky Mountains, many will not grow back and will instead convert to grasslands and shrublands.

KVNF spoke to Kyle Rodman, the study's lead author, about what landscapes might look like after the Pine Gulch and Grizzly Creek fires.

  • New report shows that during the pandemic, households with children face highest hardship rates
  • COVID-19 vaccine could be made available before clinical trials are complete, says FDA
  • Vail Resorts will require reservations to ski next season -- but not for employees
  • New study finds that many burned forests in Colorado may not regrow, due to hotter, drier conditions

Kaspar Keil

The live events industry has declared a red alert with over 1500 venues across the country illuminating their buildings in red at night to raise awareness about the financial strain of the pandemic. The goal is to encourage Congress to pass bipartisan legislation known as the Restart Act, sponsored by Colorado U.S. Senator Michael Bennet. KVNF’s Gavin Dahl learned more from Sen. Bennet about the proposed law earlier this summer.

Courtesy of High Country News

High Country News, the nonprofit newsmagazine headquartered in Paonia, is kicking off its 50th anniversary this week. Founded in Lander, Wyoming in 1970, the publication relocated to Paonia in 1983 under the leadership of Ed and Betsy Marston. High Country News became well known for its deep dives into the stories of the West’s complex environmental and natural resources issues, and its diverse communities and cultures.

  • Gov. Polis announces plan to spend federal aid money on getting more families connected to high-speed Internet during the pandemic
  • The Interior Department watchdog says top officials misled Congress regarding the controversial relocation of the Bureau of Land Management headquarters to Grand Junction
  • KVNF's Gavin Dahl speaks with High Country News publisher & executive director Greg Hanscom about the magazine's 50th anniversary

  • New COVID data shows Mesa and Montrose County with medium rates of infection, Delta and Gunnison County with high rates, and Ouray and San Miguel with very high rates
  • Fighting Colorado's four biggest wildfires has cost $77 million so far
  • A new statewide campaign for more responsible recreation is now underway as Joe Lewandowski from Colorado Parks & Wildlife tells KVNF's Jodi Peterson
  • KSUT's Mark Duggan shares how one Coloradan is using "bots" for good on the Internet

Gavin Dahl

As area wildlife manager for Montrose since 2006, Renzo DelPiccolo’s responsibilities at Colorado Parks and Wildlife included law enforcement for hunting, tracking poachers, managing wildlife conflicts with bears and elk, public education, and advising land use planners on wildlife impacts. Over the course of a 33-year career at CPW, Renzo considers his work helping create new wildlife areas for permanent protection and reintroducing moose to the Grand Mesa among his biggest accomplishments. We spoke on his last day before retirement.

  • Congressional candidates Diane Mitsch Bush, Lauren Boebert agree on protecting Western Slope water
  • Delta County reports second COVID-19 death
  • Town of Cedaredge trustees remove planning commission vice chair James Ayers
  • Fort Mojave Indian Tribe seeks a new national monument in Nevada
  • Renzo DelPiccolo speaks to KVNF on his last day after 33 years at Colorado Parks & Wildlife

rawpixel.com

  • State Supreme Court declines mask mandate lawsuit
  • Senator Cory Gardner touts Grand Junction Airport grant
  • 1800 pounds of marijuana seized in local raids
  • Back the Badge allegedly used taxpayer money in violation of state law
  • Utility shut off moratoriums end
  • 11 statewide initiatives qualified for Nov ballot
  • KOTO's Matt Hoisch on Telluride resort's plans

  • Honda settles defective airbag suit with Colorado for $1.6M
  • Ouray County offering free COVID testing Aug. 31 & Sep. 1, giving up on mask compliance
  • No charges filed against officers who shot David Martin 17 times in Fruita
  • State says West Elk Mine may have violated the law
  • House Republican sues Gov. Polis over mask mandate
  • Airline industry may not recover for several years
  • KDNK's Kathleen Shannon learns about pandemic EBT from Hunger Free Colorado

  • Grand Junction protesters concerned over US Postal Service changes
  • Rundown of the nine measures now qualified for the November ballot
  • Delicious Orchard's Jeff Schwartz says lack of oil and gas ballot measures gives opportunity to local businesses
  • State lawmakers will loan a vandalized monument to a Denver museum
  • New survey shows Americans have a lot of misconceptions about immigrants

Western Slope theaters welcome movie-goers again

Aug 25, 2020
Laura Palmisano

The movie business, like many industries, is struggling because of the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s caused many movie theaters to remain closed for months. However, some independent and chain theaters are reopening. For KVNF News, Laura Palmisano reports.

Laura Palmisano

  • Ballot measure would limit state government enterprises
  • Montrose Police Department welcomes three new officers
  • Grand Junction defense contractor Capco Inc. awarded major contract
  • Gov. Polis reviews school safety measures
  • Self-sufficient Westerners still support government relief spending
  • Movie theatres are starting to reopen on the Western Slope

      

Amber Share

  • I-70 reopened through Glenwood Canyon, traffic doubled on U.S. 50 near Gunnison during the closure
  • Grand Junction has felt record temperatures this month
  • Western Slope voters will have more official ballot drop boxes to choose from
  • Gov. Polis now allowing bars to stay open until 11pm
  • Two lawsuits seek ouster of William Perry Pendley at BLM
  • KSJD's Daniel Rayzel reports on hilarious 'Subpar Parks' posters by Amber Share

Courtesy of Bruce Noble

Bruce Noble is the retired superintendent of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park and Curecanti Recreation Area. He and an all-star team of other veteran leaders with a combined 179 years of service to the national park system are advocating for passage of the CORE Act by Congress.

  • Updated COVID-19 numbers for the region
  • Bureau of Land Management dispute with conservation groups headed to court
  • Retired Black Canyon National Park superintendent Bruce Noble speaks with Gavin Dahl about why he and other Park Service veterans are advocating for Congress to pass the CORE Act
  • Paonia Town Administrator Corinne Ferguson speaks with Jodi Peterson about new voluntary water restriction

  • Firefighters got a new wildfire near Carbondale under control quickly
  • Paonia, Hotchkiss, Crawford ask residents to reduce water use
  • Jere Lowe will challenge Wendell Koontz for Delta County Commission
  • Montrose, Olathe sales tax up during June
  • Paonia, Grand Junction will vote on new ballot measures
  • Local residents Bob Kalenak, Allison Elliot, Thomas Markle, Danielle Carre share their concerns about Land Use Code changes proposed by Delta County ahead of public comment deadline

  • Gov. Polis bans open burning amidst 4 major Colorado wildfires
  • CDPHE releases COVID-19 guidance to help parents make school decisions
  • Eligible unemployed Coloradans can get additional money
  • New survey: Reopening schools not safe
  • Cowboy up, mask up
  • Initiative to lower state income tax qualifies for Nov. ballot
  • Air quality expert Andrea Holland shares advice. See smoke forecast outlooks here.

  • Town of Paonia begins voluntary watering restrictions
  • Reservoir on Cerro Summit nearly operational again
  • Low cost spay & neuter clinic in Delta this week
  • Colorado partnering with private labs to speed up COVID testing
  • AG Weiser considering legal action to protect USPS
  • COVID-19 a leading cause of death in Colorado
  • Intern Carmen Rodriguez talks to youth about how they spent the summer

Pandemic helps drive Colorado real estate boom

Aug 18, 2020
Laura Palmisano

 Home sales are booming in the West despite the economic downturn. In Colorado, sales broke records last month. Realtors across the state say they are seeing available real estate sell quickly in urban and rural areas. For KVNF News, Laura Palmisano explores what’s behind this trend.

  • Montrose County Public Health reported 5 new COVID-19 cases since Aug. 10
  • Bureau of Reclamation increasing releases into Gunnison River
  • Poll finds Mitsch Bush, Boebert tied in Third District
  • Trump plans to withdraw Pendley nomination for BLM
  • Should we be naming heat waves?
  • Laura Palmisano reports on record-breaking home sales in Colorado

Jena Griswold

Colorado is widely recognized as the gold standard for accessible and secure elections. With President Donald Trump openly stating his support for voter suppression tactics, and politicizing the U.S. Postal Service, KVNF's Gavin Dahl asked Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold what that means for her work as the top election official in the state. You can register to vote or update your registration at GoVoteColorado.gov.

  • DMEA implements fire precautions, so power outages may last longer
  • Mesa County and BLM implement Stage 2 fire restrictions
  • Delta County reports first human case of West Nile virus in Cedaredge
  • State Capitol building could soon be fortified
  • Aurora Police Department under investigation by Colorado attorney general
  • BLM makes its move to Grand Junction official as opposition to making William Perry Pendley permanent director grows

  • Western Colorado makes national news as a climate change hotspot
  • Powderhorn Mountain Resort launches energy-efficient snowmaking 
  • Delta County investigating COVID-19 outbreak at El Tapatio in Delta
  • Gov. Polis extends his executive order delaying some Colorado evictions
  • Part Three: Eviction crisis could be softened by these local and state solutions 

  • Mesa County reported 12 new COVID cases on Sunday
  • Public Utilities Commission consumer affairs unit offering help for customers
  • Colorado's independent redistricting commission is now accepting applicants
  • Arts orgs are adapting to new reality with virtual events
  • Gov. Polis is skeptical Trump's unemployment order will work in Colorado
  • Part Two: Noah Glick reports on the eviction crisis

  • The Pine Gulch Fire is expected to continued growing
  • Montrose County School District releases in-person learning details
  • A hiker named Larry Vangelder died on the Box Canyon Trail in Ouray
  • New law means Cedaredge residents must control mosquitoes, rodents on their property
  • Big Sky Conference postpones college football until Spring 2021
  • Part One: Noah Glick reports on the eviction crisis

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