air pollution

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  • Delta Health facing critical financial losses
  • Colorado making more rental assistance payments as eviction moratorium ends
  • Nordic Council & Forest Service identify 2 possible solutions for Grand Mesa conflict
  • Mesa County voters will decide on 2 marijuana measures this November
  • Statewide ballot questions aim to raise marijuana prices, lower property taxes, restrict state spending
  • Health experts offering tips to reduce air pollution inside homes
  • USDA sees drought impacts on soybean crops

Liz Teitz / Ouray County Plaindealer

  • Mesa Valley School District will not require masks when school starts
  • Air Pollution Control Division withdraws proposed traffic reduction program
  • Two former Indian boarding schools will be investigated for unmarked graves
  • Interior Secretary Deb Haaland visits Grand Junction BLM HQ, meets CORE Act supporters in Ridgway
  • BLM removing West Douglas Herd of wild horses south of Rangely
  • For those with compromised immune systems, getting back to pre-pandemic life is not simple, and low vaccination rates aren't helping

  

GRIZZLY CREEK FIRE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM

  • John Hickenlooper campaigns in Grand Junction
  • Colorado Air Quality Commission will require pollution monitoring at new oil & gas wells
  • Curecanti Rec Area getting major upgrade
  • Unemployment rates high in our region
  • Activists want climate questions in the debates
  • State climatologist Russ Schumacher talks wildfires

  

iSeeChange: Hazy Days

Aug 27, 2015

Something’s in the air.  Ridgway resident Sue Husch noticed last week the same thing a lot of people on the Western Slope noticed: smoke.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that the Environmental Protection Agency made a mistake when it told electric power plants to reduce mercury emissions. The high court says the EPA should first have considered how much it would cost power plants to do that.

The decision comes too late for most power companies, but it could affect future EPA regulations.

Mercury in the air is a health risk. When you burn coal or oil, you create airborne mercury that can end up in fish we eat and cause serious health problems.