Climate Change

Roberta McGowan / The Sopris Sun

  • Colorado sending National Guard troops to inauguration
  • Governor launches Greenhouse Gas Pollution Reduction roadmap
  • Congresswoman Lauren Boebert's communications director resigns
  • Senator John Hickenlooper announces 7 regional offices, including Grand Junction, Durango
  • Colorado lawmakers adjourned for at least a month after 3-day 'soft opening'
  • KBUT's Christopher Biddle reports on the fight for clean drinking water in Somerset

  

Noah Glick

  • Vandalism at 3 Aspen natural gas pump stations left 3500 residents without heat or hot water
  • Resort community real estate sales in Colorado have set records since July
  • Health officials believe they've identified first confirmed case of COVID-19 variance in Colorado
  • Mountain West News Bureau shares part 2 of series on the environmental impacts of lithium mining

  

Chad Reich

Chad Reich is back on KVNF for this week's Local Motion to go deeper into the story of 'The North Fork Exception.' Mountain Coal Company wants to expand into lands on The Gunnison National Forest's roadless areas and environmental groups want to stop them. The story involves ongoing battles in the courts over roads and drilling pads. The mine hasn't responded to emails or phone calls since July so they couldn't be included in the story. Instead, Chad shares the voices of coal advocates, conservation groups, and government officials.

  

Julia Caulfield / KOTO

  • Montrose School District announces plans for start of semester
  • Applefest in Cedaredge saved by Town Trustees as Chamber of Commerce dissolves
  • Robert Redford announces sale of Sundance Mountain Resort in Utah
  • Colorado lawmakers will delay legislative session at least a month due to COVID
  • KOTO: 3 local governments join climate change lawsuits against fossil fuel companies 

  

Judy Fahys / InsideClimateNews

  • State revokes Ex-Delta Police officer Jeremy Gay's certification for lying 
  • Town of Paonia clears up CDPHE water supply violations
  • Colorado bars, restaurants can keep some sales taxes collected
  • Labor unions receive more than 1000 workplace safety complaints during COVID pandemic
  • Reporter Judy Fahys discovers Great Basin cave offers global warming cautionary tale

  

The Old Farmer's Almanac has been sharing farming and homesteading tips and offering weather predictions since the 1700’s. While it is unclear exactly how they make their weather predictions, an answer to a listener's question helps us see that what is clear is that climate change is making weather much more variable and extreme and so prediction methodologies based primarily on historical weather patterns are becoming less reliable.

Kori Stanton

Here on Rain & Shine we are looking at ways we can protect our communities from desertification in the face of a destabilizing climate by slowing down the rate at which water moves through our landscapes.

KVNF Regional Newscast: September 30, 2020

Sep 30, 2020
Bureau of Land Management

  • Watchdog group challenges new Delta County ag plan
  • Toxic algae spreading in Blue Mesa Reservoir
  • COGCC approves new rules for oil & gas 
  • Governor warns COVID numbers are still too high
  • Climate change causing reduction of aspen trees in Colorado
  • What's next for BLM with acting director Pendley ousted by judge?

  

GRIZZLY CREEK FIRE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM

  • John Hickenlooper campaigns in Grand Junction
  • Colorado Air Quality Commission will require pollution monitoring at new oil & gas wells
  • Curecanti Rec Area getting major upgrade
  • Unemployment rates high in our region
  • Activists want climate questions in the debates
  • State climatologist Russ Schumacher talks wildfires

  

Wyoming Fish & Game

  • State names Delta Walmart pharmacy, Delta Building Center as COVID outbreak sites
  • Affordable housing project in Ridgway to break ground next spring
  • Luke Runyon: Colorado River's largest reservoirs expected to keep struggling due to climate change
  • Scott Franz: Gray wolf reintroduction proposition will be on the statewide ballot 

  

Kori Stanton

The way we manage water has largely been focused on quantity and quality. This has led to a scarcity mentality where we are faced with there not being “enough” water immediately available. When we step back and look at the way water moves throughout the planet-in large and small water cycles- we can begin to see that all the water there is, is still there.

Amber Share

  • I-70 reopened through Glenwood Canyon, traffic doubled on U.S. 50 near Gunnison during the closure
  • Grand Junction has felt record temperatures this month
  • Western Slope voters will have more official ballot drop boxes to choose from
  • Gov. Polis now allowing bars to stay open until 11pm
  • Two lawsuits seek ouster of William Perry Pendley at BLM
  • KSJD's Daniel Rayzel reports on hilarious 'Subpar Parks' posters by Amber Share

  • Montrose County Public Health reported 5 new COVID-19 cases since Aug. 10
  • Bureau of Reclamation increasing releases into Gunnison River
  • Poll finds Mitsch Bush, Boebert tied in Third District
  • Trump plans to withdraw Pendley nomination for BLM
  • Should we be naming heat waves?
  • Laura Palmisano reports on record-breaking home sales in Colorado

  • Western Colorado makes national news as a climate change hotspot
  • Powderhorn Mountain Resort launches energy-efficient snowmaking 
  • Delta County investigating COVID-19 outbreak at El Tapatio in Delta
  • Gov. Polis extends his executive order delaying some Colorado evictions
  • Part Three: Eviction crisis could be softened by these local and state solutions 

  • New study indicates climate change danger to Colorado River Basin
  • Elk herd feeding in North Fork Valley, frequently crosses highway at dawn and dusk
  • Lawmakers take up contentitous paid family leave act again, hope for passage

Local Motion: Mud, methane and the mad scientist

Jan 28, 2020
Alan Wartes

Delta Brick & Climate Company was founded by Christopher Caskey, a scientist and entrepreneur who is passionate about energy, sustainable business development, and innovation. Caskey's business aims to make a difference in several big picture environmental challenges at once. This piece was produced by Alan Wartes as part of The Flyovers podcast. Through his discussions with various entrepreneurs, Wartes reveals the challenges, opportunities, and the importance of founding a business in a rural community.

  • Teenaged climate change activist rallies at State Capitol
  • Acting BLM director doesn't believe climate change is real
  • Teams make harrowing rescue of two climbers in Black Canyon
  • Coloradans still have time to comment on public insurance option
  • Decker Fire outside of Salida grows despite freezing temperatures

  • Senator Ray Scott speaks at CU climate change forum
  • GOCO grants awarded to Western Slope communities for recreation
  • Ranchers, farmers in Four Corners deal with climate change daily

  • Lawmakers meet in Boulder to discuss climate change in Colorado
  • Clinics around Colorado offering free back to school services this week
  • Scientists re-enact Powell's famous exploration of Green, Colorado Rivers

  • Colorado leading the way for states that want a public insurance option
  • KVNF News examines how the Federal Government will look at climage change
  • Grand Junction schools name permanent Superintendent
  • Bear that attacked a hiker on Memorial Day identified, killed
  • Delta County Commissioners sign contract for new Human Services Building

  • State lawmakers proposing effort to mitigate climate change
  • Over 200 bills left for discussion in legislative session that ends Friday
  • Health care, insurance costs still up for debate at state house
  • Voters will decide if exceptions to TABOR get made regarding refunds

  • Hotchkiss Town Hall features angry citizens confronting lawmakers
  • Advocates of paid leave for 12 weeks have their say at State Capitol
  • Bill that addresses climate change in state going through legislature

  • Delta High School science teacher wins fellowship to study climate change
  • National Geographic ambassador talks about journey of exploration
  • Capitol Conversation interview about a couple of bills at state house

  • State Supreme Court denies Hickenlooper's request to clarify TABOR, Gallagher Amendment
  • Voters in San Miguel County approve financing for anti-suicide effort
  • Drought, climate change in state to get worse despite early snowfall
  • Nearly 50 percent of all state residents live in high wildfire danger areas
  • Boat ramps at Blue Mesa Reservoir closed due to low water, ice

  • Gunnison Energy proposes a second seismic mapping project 0utside Paonia
  • Governor-elect Polis prepares transition team to take office next month
  • Western Slope Resources Reporting on local Carbondale efforts to curb climate change

  • Town of Paonia sends letter detailing water regulation violations
  • Water in Paonia clean and safe, violations occurred in reporting test results
  • CU scientists looking at possible severe flooding due to climate change

  • City of Aspen institutes mandatory water restrictions for first time
  • Climate change hurting Colorado's summertime outdoors economy
  • Governor's race most expensive in history, prompts calls for reform

  • Petition effort to get setbacks on ballot facing uphill battle
  • Update on Buttermilk Fire outside Montrose in Gunnison Gorge
  • Two high country hiking fatalities last week
  • Two incidents of political pranking bring Russia debate to local venues
  • Study shows both parties agree that climate change is real, disagree on what to do

  • Final installment of water conservation series
  • Denver follows others in recycling sewage, people wary of drinking it
  • Climate change in state can be altered by diet choices

  • Climate change impacting air quality in Colorado
  • Fires in southwest cause decline in air quality
  • Town of Ophir uses composting to increase sustainability
  • Western Slope Resources Reporting about a town reinventing itself

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