Climate Change

Citizens for a Healthy Community

  • Montrose High School graduate Daniel Granberg dies in Bolivia
  • Jury finds Henry Russell not guilty of attempted murder for Paonia shooting
  • Montrose mayor pro tem Dave Frank appointed chair of CML policy committee
  • Class-action lawsuit filed against state Medicaid program
  • Trooper who protects the Governor arrested, charged with felony menacing
  • Colorado hospitals show signs of stress as number of COVID patients grows
  • Citizens for a Healthy Community panel addresses climate change

  

  • Six Mesa County election workers, not implicated in Clerk Tina Peters' alleged crimes, still have office access 
  • West Region Wildfire Council receives two major forest restoration grants
  • Four Corners Folk Festival revises COVID protocols
  • Telluride considering Town Park, 2 other properties, for temporary winter housing
  • KOTO: Telluride suspends most new short term rental licenses
  • Mountain West News Bureau: Extreme heat from climate change makes it harder to keep houses cool 

Kate Redmond speaks with David Inouye, Chief Investigator at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Gothic, Colorado about the effects of climate change, including melting permafrost in the northern hemisphere and the slowing of Atlantic Ocean currents. Inouye also details adaptations to climate change he observes in Western Colorado.

Amy Hadden Marsh / KDNK

  • Highway 50 returns to regular closures Sept 1
  • July the hottest month ever recorded
  • Research shows wildfire smoke harmful to dairy cows
  • Colorado will require vaccines for workers at 24/7 facilities for vulnerable populations
  • FEC alleges Lauren Boebert has been spending campaign funds for personal use
  • KDNK's Amy Hadden Marsh reports Cottonwood Pass, at times narrow and dangerous, has become more popular during Glenwood Canyon closures, but a long-term plan is needed

  

Lake Mead
U.S. Geological Survey

  • Mesa County Commissioners name former Secretary of State Wayne Williams their new top election official, as current Secretary of State's investigation into Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters continues
  • Funding begins to flow as shortage of licensed childcare facilities intensifies
  • Governor Polis urges CDPHE to mandate vaccines for personnel caring for vulnerable populations
  • Climate change makes it hard to predict when water shortage in lower Colorado River basin will end
  • Kate Redmond speaks with Delta Hospital pulmonologist Sara Knutson about COVID-19

Carnegie Library for Local History / Museum of Boulder Collection and Boulder County Parks & Open Space

This week on Local Motion, news director Gavin Dahl speaks with two journalists. Guardian reporter Chris McGreal's latest article is on lawsuits filed by local Colorado governments seeking climate mitigation funds from energy companies based on accusations of deceptive practices, consumer fraud, and suppressing their own scientific evidence.

Kate Redmond

  • COVID transmission in Delta County now 'substantial'
  • Delta County Schools returning in-person with no mask mandate, despite CDC recommendations
  • Cedaredge trustees select retail marijuana vendors
  • USDA endorses Colorado proposal to grow hemp industry
  • State investigation of Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters could lead to criminal charges
  • Curecanti Rec Area designated dark sky park
  • Kate Redmond catches up with Julia Kumari Drapkin who launched I See Change at KVNF

  

Tamara Chuang / Colorado Sun

  • New Colorado law lets universities award associates degrees to students who accrued 70 college credits
  • Bureau of Reclamation drawing down Blue Mesa Reservoir to help shore up Lake Powell
  • Colorado Sun reporter Tamara Chuang asked readers what constitutes a living wage, and discusses their responses with KGNU's Shannon Young

  

Sen. Kerry Donovan

  • 5 Mesa County residents test positive for COVID variant first seen in India
  • Gov. Polis signs bill requiring State Board of Education to review civics education standards
  • Rep. Lauren Boebert's press secretary sends letter to operators of satire site TheLaurenBoebert.com
  • Cie Hoover's art exhibit closes tonight at Wright Opera House in Ouray
  • Laura Palmisano interviews Democrat State Senator Kerry Donovan of Vail about what's she's working on this legislative session

  • EcoGen BioSciences acquires 165-acre hemp farm & production campus south of Delta
  • Montrose Republican representative Marc Catlin named vice chair of House Ag Committee
  • Lawmakers make more changes to bill aiming to cut insurance premiums
  • Unexpected buyer partly to blame for continued increase in housing prices
  • Tech leaders active fighting climate change say Colorado will see green job growth
  • Colorado will add 8th seat in Congress thanks to new Census data

  

Roy Buri / Pixabay

  • USDA, EPA, FDA launch Restore Colorado to reduce food waste
  • Ela Family Farms starts 'adopt a tree' program, supporters get sapling named after them
  • USBR releases Aspinall Water to assist with low Gunnison River flows 
  • Green jobs rebounding after pandemic plunge
  • Luke Runyon reports on water speculation
  • New research says wildfire smoke may have caused bird die-off last year
  • Delta BOCC awards recycling contract to Double J
  • Colorado officials welcome return of federal work on mitigating climate change impacts

  

Gavin Dahl

  • Arbol Farm Market moving to Paonia Town Park
  • Taneal Mautz of Paonia High & Adam Smith of Hotchkiss High awarded Daniels scholarships
  • 911 system upgrades may impact PBX and multiline phone systems, not landlines or cell phones
  • Lawmakers delay hearing on bill to lower health insurance premiums
  • Economists say reducing emissions now will save money long-term
  • Former Scott Tipton staffer says Lauren Boebert's criticisms onstage in Montrose are false

  

Courtesy of AZYEP

This week's show comes courtesy of the Andy Zanca Youth Empowerment Program, based in the Roaring Fork Valley. A Basalt high school student and AZYEP DJ named Connor Hoffman is building an electric snowmobile with his Dad for the Aspen Skiing Company. AZYEP project coordinator and podcast producer Halle Zander speaks to him, as well as SkiCo's vice president of sustainability Auden Schendler about why they're fighting the climate crisis with electrification.

Conservatives for Responsible Stewardship

  • Delta County Memorial Hospital & 13 clinics rebranding as Delta Health
  • Animas River records record low flow, again
  • Elijah McClain: Investigation criticizes Aurora police & 'failed' internal investigation
  • Lauren Boebert amends FEC filing on mileage reimbursements
  • Critics: FCC awarded SpaceX nearly $900m for untested rural broadband project
  • Luke Runyon: Rivers in the southwest impacted by climate change
  • Kate Redmond interviews Conservatives for Responsible Stewardship president David Jenkins

Maeve Conran / KGNU

  • Delta Libraries closed temporarily this week in response to a belligerent man refusing to wear a mask
  • Paonia Town Council renewed Corinne Ferguson's contract
  • Colorado West Land Trust announced conservation of ranch land near Black Canyon
  • Sabotage of Aspen gas lines continues to vex investigators
  • KGNU's Maeve Conran reports a proposal for what could be the state's largest fracking site is drawing community opposition in Boulder County, including high schoolers adding their voices to the chorus of protest

  

Local Motion: Allan Savory

Jan 26, 2021
Sara Rubinstein

The 9th Annual Western Colorado Food and Farm Forum was held virtually on January 23nd - 23rd. This year's Keynote Speaker was Zimbabwean Ecologist Allan Savory of the Savory Institute.

Maeve Conran / KGNU

  • Mesa County Economic Development group hopes BLM headquarters stays in Grand Junction
  • X Games will proceed in Aspen with no spectators
  • Western Colorado Food & Farm Forum kicks off with virtual screening tonight
  • Governor Polis urges hospitals to use now the COVID vaccines reserved for second doses
  • KGNU's Maeve Conran reports one researcher shining a light on the impact of fossil fuel emissions on air quality has become a target of the industry

  

Luke Runyon / KUNC

  • New federal lawsuit challenges Fish & Wildlife Service de-listing gray wolves from Endangered Species list
  • Colorado Parks & Wildlife begins phasing in reintroduction of gray wolves, as approved last election
  • Littleton man Patrick Montgomery becomes 4th Coloradan arrested since insurrection in Washington
  • Kori Stanton: 9th annual Western Colorado Food & Farm Forum goes virtual this Friday & Saturday
  • Luke Runyon: Scientists investigate what happens when a river's headwaters goes up in smoke

Roberta McGowan / The Sopris Sun

  • Colorado sending National Guard troops to inauguration
  • Governor launches Greenhouse Gas Pollution Reduction roadmap
  • Congresswoman Lauren Boebert's communications director resigns
  • Senator John Hickenlooper announces 7 regional offices, including Grand Junction, Durango
  • Colorado lawmakers adjourned for at least a month after 3-day 'soft opening'
  • KBUT's Christopher Biddle reports on the fight for clean drinking water in Somerset

  

Noah Glick

  • Vandalism at 3 Aspen natural gas pump stations left 3500 residents without heat or hot water
  • Resort community real estate sales in Colorado have set records since July
  • Health officials believe they've identified first confirmed case of COVID-19 variance in Colorado
  • Mountain West News Bureau shares part 2 of series on the environmental impacts of lithium mining

  

Chad Reich

Chad Reich is back on KVNF for this week's Local Motion to go deeper into the story of 'The North Fork Exception.' Mountain Coal Company wants to expand into lands on The Gunnison National Forest's roadless areas and environmental groups want to stop them. The story involves ongoing battles in the courts over roads and drilling pads. The mine hasn't responded to emails or phone calls since July so they couldn't be included in the story. Instead, Chad shares the voices of coal advocates, conservation groups, and government officials.

  

Julia Caulfield / KOTO

  • Montrose School District announces plans for start of semester
  • Applefest in Cedaredge saved by Town Trustees as Chamber of Commerce dissolves
  • Robert Redford announces sale of Sundance Mountain Resort in Utah
  • Colorado lawmakers will delay legislative session at least a month due to COVID
  • KOTO: 3 local governments join climate change lawsuits against fossil fuel companies 

  

Judy Fahys / InsideClimateNews

  • State revokes Ex-Delta Police officer Jeremy Gay's certification for lying 
  • Town of Paonia clears up CDPHE water supply violations
  • Colorado bars, restaurants can keep some sales taxes collected
  • Labor unions receive more than 1000 workplace safety complaints during COVID pandemic
  • Reporter Judy Fahys discovers Great Basin cave offers global warming cautionary tale

  

The Old Farmer's Almanac has been sharing farming and homesteading tips and offering weather predictions since the 1700’s. While it is unclear exactly how they make their weather predictions, an answer to a listener's question helps us see that what is clear is that climate change is making weather much more variable and extreme and so prediction methodologies based primarily on historical weather patterns are becoming less reliable.

Kori Stanton

Here on Rain & Shine we are looking at ways we can protect our communities from desertification in the face of a destabilizing climate by slowing down the rate at which water moves through our landscapes.

KVNF Regional Newscast: September 30, 2020

Sep 30, 2020
Bureau of Land Management

  • Watchdog group challenges new Delta County ag plan
  • Toxic algae spreading in Blue Mesa Reservoir
  • COGCC approves new rules for oil & gas 
  • Governor warns COVID numbers are still too high
  • Climate change causing reduction of aspen trees in Colorado
  • What's next for BLM with acting director Pendley ousted by judge?

  

GRIZZLY CREEK FIRE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM

  • John Hickenlooper campaigns in Grand Junction
  • Colorado Air Quality Commission will require pollution monitoring at new oil & gas wells
  • Curecanti Rec Area getting major upgrade
  • Unemployment rates high in our region
  • Activists want climate questions in the debates
  • State climatologist Russ Schumacher talks wildfires

  

Wyoming Fish & Game

  • State names Delta Walmart pharmacy, Delta Building Center as COVID outbreak sites
  • Affordable housing project in Ridgway to break ground next spring
  • Luke Runyon: Colorado River's largest reservoirs expected to keep struggling due to climate change
  • Scott Franz: Gray wolf reintroduction proposition will be on the statewide ballot 

  

Rain & Shine: Water Cycles

Sep 14, 2020
Kori Stanton

The way we manage water has largely been focused on quantity and quality. This has led to a scarcity mentality where we are faced with there not being “enough” water immediately available. When we step back and look at the way water moves throughout the planet-in large and small water cycles- we can begin to see that all the water there is, is still there.

Amber Share

  • I-70 reopened through Glenwood Canyon, traffic doubled on U.S. 50 near Gunnison during the closure
  • Grand Junction has felt record temperatures this month
  • Western Slope voters will have more official ballot drop boxes to choose from
  • Gov. Polis now allowing bars to stay open until 11pm
  • Two lawsuits seek ouster of William Perry Pendley at BLM
  • KSJD's Daniel Rayzel reports on hilarious 'Subpar Parks' posters by Amber Share

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