Colorado Division of Insurance

Marty Durlin

  • 2021 individual health insurance premiums in Colorado will decrease an average of 1.4% while group rates will increase an average of 3.8%
  • Attorney General Phil Weiser met with local officials in Montrose to discuss election integrity, voter intimidation, misinformation
  • KSUT moves into new Tribal Media Center
  • Temporary ban on certain visas impacts ski industry hiring
  • DCI reporter Lisa Young discusses her coverage of proposed changes to Delta County land use code

  • 4 Delta County Sheriff's office staff tested positive for COVID-19, recovered, and are back to work
  • Colorado Division of Insurance anticipates 2021 individual health plans will cost less thanks to the reinsurance program
  • New report: coal mine reclamation could create thousands of jobs
  • 2 Colorado ballot initiatives on oil and gas have been pulled
  • Communities of color are vulnerable

Data continues to show that where a person lives in Colorado plays a big role in dictating how much they pay for health insurance. That's because insurers use it to calculate premiums and in some regions it's unusually high. State lawmakers are aware of the problem – but are not sure what the solution is.

"I was seeing upwards of $500 a month," said Sam Higby, a Breckenridge outdoor gear shop employee. He's 35 and healthy, but said on his salary he simply can't afford healthcare.

"It does weigh on me as an active person, being concerned about what might happen out there."

Feds OK Changes To Colorado Health Insurance Regions

May 20, 2014
Colorado Division of Insurance, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
Colorado Division of Insurance

The federal government has approved the state’s request to consolidate its geographic rating areas for health insurance. These insurance regions were created as a part of the Affordable Care Act, and are used by insurance companies to set premiums. 

The Colorado Division of Insurance said the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services has given approval for the state to shuffle its 11  regions for health insurance into nine next year. 

The reshape will combine four rural areas into two larger ones while keeping seven established urban areas.