Colorado State University

Stephen Pribut / Wikimedia Commons

  • Historic bank building in Ridgway gutted by fire
  • Southwest Airlines now flying from Montrose to Denver, Dallas
  • Montrose green waste program suspended due to contaminated loads
  • West Elk Mine facing new fines
  • CSU research project brings 10 bison to preserve in Bent County
  • Local drug case thrown out due to illegal police search
  • Governor praises Congress for COVID relief package
  • Jodi Peterson reports on more efficient irrigation methods 

Deer Tree Farm, Hotchkiss, Colorado

The Colorado River and its tributaries irrigate some of the country’s most productive farmland, in Western Colorado. But agriculture in this arid region is made more difficult by its salty soil, and old-school irrigation methods that send harmful minerals into streams. KVNF's Jodi Peterson has more on a program that’s helping upstream farmers use water more efficiently … to help keep downstream growers in business. 

Kori Stanton

Colorado's Drought and Agriculture Impact Task Forces have expanded on a virtual drought tour concept to assess conditions from those most impacted by the 2020 drought and active wildfire season. The Task Forces are seeking stories from producers and communities significantly impacted by drought.

Kori Stanton

KVNF discusses the impacts of continuous hot and dry weather in Western Colorado with Reagan Waskom, Director, Colorado Water Institute, Colorado State University, Harrison Topp, Topp Fruits, Kate Greenberg, Colorado Commissioner of Agriculture, and rancher, Cynthia Houseweart, Princess Beef.

KVNF Regional Newscast: Friday, Jan. 22, 2016

Jan 22, 2016

  •  New service allows mentally distressed youth to text for help
  • Plans are in the works to develop defunct CSU agricultural research site
  • Pipe bursts during Ouray Ice Climbing Festival
  • Majority of voters don’t want state control of federal lands
  • Clean Water Act changes vetoes by President Obama

Close to 60,000 jobs are set to open up in agriculture, food and natural resource sectors each year for the next five years, according to a report from Purdue University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The American agriculture industry has a problem though; there are not enough grads to fill those jobs. The report projects about two open jobs for every qualified graduate. That’s left the USDA, land grant universities and private industry scrambling to try and bridge the gap.

KVNF Regional Newscast: Friday, Nov. 13, 2015

Nov 13, 2015

  • GJPD: Officers struck by reckless driver
  • Suspicious device at Telluride gas station deemed safe
  • CSU study finds no evidence of dangerous oil, gas contaminants in water
  • Can small communities tackle global food security?

Colorado's ban on collecting rain from residential rooftops has been a contentious topic at the statehouse, and a proposed bill for 2016 means it will likely be debated once again.

"Colorado is the only western state where rain barrels are illegal," said Drew Beckwith, a water policy manager with the nonprofit Western Resource Advocates.

"Every other western state that has our water laws has them legal, and it has not caused the Earth to come crashing to a halt."

So why is there so much controversy over collecting rainwater? The sticking point is whether doing so impacts downstream water users.

On a research farm north of Fort Collins, Colorado, in a secret location, buried in the middle of a corn field, grows Colorado’s newest and most buzzed about commodity crop -- industrial hemp.

It’s almost harvest time at the farm, and soon researchers at Colorado State University will be adding bushels of hemp next to the usual, familiar piles of corn, wheat and oats.

Hemp is a member of the cannabis family, but it’s lacking in psychoactive properties. Instead, it’s grown more for fiber and oil. But decades of prohibition have left academia lacking in published scientific research about the plant’s very basic properties.

CSU Rogers Mesa Agricultural Research Center
Linda Rubick

A group of Delta County stakeholders wants to breathe new life into a shuttered agricultural research center. The Colorado State University facility sits on 83 acres outside of Hotchkiss on Rogers Mesa. 

The property has a residence, classrooms, laboratory space, offices, cold storage, a greenhouse and equipment storage sheds. 

CSU used the site to conduct research on fruit trees, but now the classrooms and laboratories sit empty.

The next time you're in the dairy aisle at the supermarket, take a moment to imagine the animals that produced all that milk. Do these cows have horns? Chances are they do, or at least they did at birth.

About 85 percent of milk sold in the United States comes from Holstein cows born with horns. But it's standard practice for farms to remove horns from cattle to prevent injuries to workers, veterinarians and other cows in the herd.

The marijuana industry has a pesticide problem. Many commercial cannabis growers use chemicals to control bugs and mold. But the plant's legal status is unresolved.

The grow room at Medical MJ Supply in Fort Collins, Colo., has all the trappings of a modern marijuana cultivation facility: glowing yellow lights, plastic irrigation tubes, and rows of knee-high cannabis plants.

"We're seeing a crop that's probably in it third or fourth week," says Nick Dice, the owner.

Colorado is famous for its beer and its beef. But what about its farm drones?

For almost a century, explorers have searched the jungles of Honduras for a legendary lost city known as the White City, or the City of the Monkey God.

A team of explorers — including archaeologists and a documentary filmmaker — have just returned from an expedition in person, after using a new technology to search for evidence of ruins by plane.

Humans have been growing hemp for centuries. Hemp-based foods have taken off recently. So have lotions and soaps that use hemp oil. Studies underway now are examining how different compounds in cannabis could be used as medicine. There’s hope its chemical compounds could hold keys to medical treatments for Parkinson’s disease and childhood epilepsy.

Scientists studying industrial hemp say the plant holds a tremendous amount of promise. But to unlock its potential there’s very basic scientific research to be done.

Governor Hickenlooper Sworn In For Second Term

Jan 14, 2015

Governor John Hickenlooper was sworn into office Tuesday for his second term, with the ceremony taking place outside the west steps of the state capitol. Several hundred people gathered to watch Hickenlooper along with other statewide elected officials take the oath of office.

"I believe that if we are willing to compromise and collaborate on what may seem like an imperfect solution, it is far better than if we cling to entrenched positions and work against one another in pursuit of different allegedly perfect solutions," said Hickenlooper. "Progress, even if incremental, is better than gridlock."

Temple Grandin Discusses Autism

Jan 9, 2015
Temple Grandin
Rosalie Winard

Temple Grandin is a well-known advocate for autism awareness and a professor of animal sciences at Colorado State University. She came to Grand Junction Friday to speak at an autism conference, as someone who has autism. KVNF's Laura Palmisano sat down with Grandin before the conference.

Manhattan's Central Park is surrounded by one of the densest cities on the planet. It's green enough, yet hardly the first place most people would think of as biologically rich.

I think soil biodiversity is like the stars beneath our feet. There is so much going on. - Kelly Ramirez, Colorado State University soil scientist

But a team of scientists got a big surprise when they recently started digging there.

In many communities, the local school district is the largest food provider, filling thousands of hungry bellies every day. But trying to feed healthful food to some of the pickiest eaters can result in mountains of wasted food.

Now, many schools are finding that giving kids a say in what they eat can cut down on what ends up in the trash.

The Comeback Of The Endangered Colorado Orange, An Apple

Sep 10, 2014

The Colorado Orange is not an orange, in color or essence.

"It is an apple, with a unique texture and taste. It has a little bit of a citrus bite," says Paul Telck, one of the few people today to have tasted the apple – a yellow fruit with an occasional red blush, once thought to be extinct.

A few years ago, Telck, who owns an orchard in Fremont County, southwest of Colorado Springs, knew little about the Colorado Orange. Now, he's involved in an effort to bring it and other endangered Colorado apples back from the brink of extinction.

Local food is no longer just a novelty. Farmers markets are growing nationwide and farms that sell directly to consumers brought in $1.3 billion in 2012, up eight percent from just five years earlier. Despite the demand, making local food work in some places is decidedly more difficult than others. Steamboat Springs is one of those places.

Kelsey Gibb
Laura Palmisano

On this week's Local Motion, we explore why millennials are moving to Colorado.


Millennials Are Moving To Colorado For Work And Play

Jul 29, 2014
Megan McMillan
Laura Palmisano

Millennials are on the move. People in their 20’s and early 30’s are the most migratory age group in the United States, according to demographers and economists.

Megan MacMillan moved to Colorado from Canada four years ago. She’s 34 years old and just found out she’s a millennial.