Denver

Jonathan Flowers / KGNU

  • Former chair of Colorado Republican Party Ryan Call will be disbarred
  • Senator Michael Bennet introduces constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United decision
  • Colorado Newsline looks into decision to scrap clean air initiative in Denver
  • Colorado Oil & Gas Conservation Commission fines KP Kauffman $2M
  • Delays on 133 near Redstone continue for rockfall mitigation
  • Paonia in Motion nears completion
  • Hundreds march in Denver, calling for a path to citizenship for immigrants

  

This week on Local Motion, Gavin Dahl speaks to author Julian Rubinstein. The Holly: Five Bullets, One Gun, and the Struggle to Save An American Neighborhood examines the role of law enforcement informants as gang violence continues in 'invisible Denver' and corrects the record on anti-gang activist Terrance Roberts.

Courtesy of Montrose School District

  • Telluride schools went on lockdown on Tuesday due to a credible threat, one person taken into custody
  • Ouray, Ridgway, Denver schools will require staff and students to wear masks
  • Mesa County School Board members escorted to cars by police after public comments devolved into threats on Tuesday night
  • Montrose School District public information officer Matt Jenkins stops by Studio M to answer questions about masks, COVID tests, vaccines, and transparent decision-making

  

  • CDC & CDPHE face confusion, paranoia about efforts to fight COVID in Mesa County
  • Reporter Sandra Fish tracks political spending of Colorado Rockies owner Dick Monfort
  • KGNU's Dave Ashton speaks to state senator Julie Gonzales and Denver County Clerk & Recorder Paul Lopez at All Star Voting Rights Rally in Denver, ahead of the MLB All-Star game tonight at Coors Field

  

Juan Labreche / AP

  • COVID hospitalizations increase this week in Colorado as overall case numbers stopped declining
  • DMEA investigating own CEO, who is on leave of absence 
  • DA charges Kiowa County deputy in rare prosecution of an officer for on-duty killing described in '3 Bullets to the Back' investigative article
  • VP Harris visited Denver on Tuesday
  • Deb Haaland confirmed as new Interior Secretary
  • Kate Redmond reports strict nursing home lockdowns are lifting

Dave Ashton / KGNU

  • Colorado lawmakers returned to the state Capitol for a soft opening of the General Assembly
  • Kori Stanton speaks to Learning Council director Alicia Michaelson and Delta County School District superintendent Caryn Gibson about the donation of a 154-book diversity library
  • KGNU's Dave Ashton reports fed up voters organized "Remove Trump Now" events around the country this week, including a car rally and parade at Denver's South High School that featured notable public officials calling for the removal of the president from office

Moe Clark / Colorado Newsline

  • Communities of color in Colorado, at greatest risk of death from COVID-19, too commonly face infection without health insurance: Open Enrollment is ongoing through January 15
  • Reporter Moe Clark talks about her story on grassroots efforts to distribute survival gear to people living on the street, as the pandemic causes more homelessness, limiting shelter capacity, and Denver sweeps encampments against CDC recommendations

Colorado Parks and Wildlife

  • Congresswoman-elect Lauren Boebert has asked to carry her gun on Capitol grounds
  • Denver buying body cameras that start recording automatically when officers draw a gun
  • Three Colorado coal plants face orders to close earlier than 2030
  • Lake City residents are raising funds to buy land on Lake San Cristobal
  • An accident in Arches National Park has led to a wrongful death claim against the Park Service
  • COGCC approves new rules intended to protect wildlife from energy development

  

Talkin Music: Augustus

Sep 3, 2020
Augustus

KVNF talks with musicians Colin Kelly and Jim Herlihy from Boulder rock band, Augustus about their upcoming album 'Color TV & Tall Tales'. The band's fifth album comes out on October 9th, 2020. 

  • Residents gathering signatures for ballot initiative limiting abortions
  • Lawmakers debating whether or not school safety laws make schools safer
  • Town of Ophir still trying to get on the rural broadband map
  • City of Denver adding options for farm to table produce

  • Colorado Springs program disposes of firearms in unique way
  • Denver submits bid to Amazon to be home of next hub
  • New study, interactive map indicates proximity of oil and gas sites

Update 5.13.2016: Gov. John Hickenlooper has signed legislation finally legalizing rain barrels. Our original story continues below.

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Colorado is the only state in the country where it is illegal to capture rainwater for use at a later time. State lawmakers are once again debating whether to allow residents to use rain barrels to collect precipitation that falls from their roofs.

"This is really straightforward," said Representative Jessie Danielson (D-Wheat Ridge), one of the main sponsor's of House Bill 16-1005 [.pdf]. "You could use that water when you see fit, for your tomato plants or flower gardens."

The Colorado Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday on whether local cities in Colorado can either ban hydraulic fracturing or declare a moratorium. The chamber was filled with a who’s who in the energy world, from policy experts and state and city officials, to top attorneys and environmental activists, highlighting the importance of the cases.

“We’re very, very, serious about not wanting fracking anywhere near us,” said Kaye Fissinger with Our Longmont. She helped spearhead the ballot campaign which Longmont voters passed in 2012. “It was a landslide victory 60 to 40 percent. The people spoke. And the people should be heard.”

The seven justices heard an hour of arguments on the Longmont case, along with an hour of arguments on the five-year fracking moratorium passed by the city of Fort Collins.

Harriet Kelly has one word to describe the day she stopped driving four years ago: miserable.

"It's no fun when you give up driving," she says. "I just have to say that."

Kelly, who lives in Denver, says she was in her 80s when she noticed her eyesight declining. She got anxious driving on the highway, so decided to stop before her kids made the move for her.

"I just told them I'd stop driving on my birthday — my 90th birthday — and I did. And I was mad at myself because I did it," she says, laughing. "I thought I was still pretty good!"

Work crews in Honolulu recently dismantled wooden shacks and tents that lined city streets and housed almost 300 people.

It was the latest example of a city trying to deal with a growing homeless population, and responding to complaints that these encampments are unsafe, unsanitary and, at the very least, unsightly.

Last month, Madison, Wis., banned people from sleeping outside city hall. And in New Port Richey, Fla., the city council voted to restrict the feeding of homeless individuals in a popular park.

Imagine a city with hundreds of liquor stores but no bars to drink in. That's the situation for marijuana in Denver.

Pot is legal in Colorado, but the capital city has outlawed pot bars like those in Amsterdam, leaving the tourists who flock to Denver to get high with no legal place to do so. But the city is trying to find a solution.

On a recent Friday afternoon at LoDo Wellness Center, a recreational pot store downtown, budtender Delaney Mason is talking up a Parmesan-scented marijuana strain called Space Queen.

Over the past four decades, Tattered Cover bookstore in Denver, Colo., has become an institution — known for its vast selection, its knowledgeable sales staff and the comfy chairs that fill the many nooks and crannies among the bookshelves.

"You can sit and read. And the people are friendly ...," says regular customer Robert Norris. "I just like the atmosphere myself."

Like a lot of students, 17-year-old Nick Bain says he really likes his school, but sometimes it can feel like a chore.

"It just feels a little bit like you just have to keep doing one thing after another, but without a whole lot of thinking about an education in general," says Nick.

So one day he decided to write down what he was doing every 15 minutes at the Colorado Academy in Denver.

A $6 million project to spiff up the state capitol is almost done. The two-year renovation of the building's signature gold dome is complete; inside the capitol workers are restoring both the House and Senate chambers.

Colorado's capitol opened in 1894 and has gone through a few restorations since then. The latest iteration restores the chambers to how they looked at the turn of the century.

Editor's note: This story was originally published on August 9, 2015.

Fresh air, the smell of pine trees, the sounds of birds chirping and brooks babbling — all of these have helped American city-dwellers unwind for generations. But in the era of Jim Crow segregation, nature's calm also gave African-Americans a temporary respite from racism and discrimination.

Daniel Majok Gai wants to go back to South Sudan.

He thinks he can help his homeland — the youngest nation in the world. Today marks the fourth anniversary of its independence. But there's little celebration. The country is being ripped apart by civil war.

Yet Gai, who suffered through years of violence and pain as a refugee, believes he can play a role in moving South Sudan toward peace and safety.

Against all odds, the 34-year-old is an incredible optimist.

He was 6 when a militia attacked his village.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

For the second night in a row, people in Baltimore appear to have mostly heeded a citywide curfew.

But solidarity protests resulted in dozens of arrests in New York, and police used pepper spray on demonstrators near the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. Other large protests were held in Seattle, Houston, Washington, Boston and Minneapolis.

The historic four-year drought in California has been grabbing the headlines lately, but there's a much bigger problem facing the West: the now 14-year drought gripping the Colorado River basin.

One of the most stunning places to see its impact is at the nation's largest reservoir, Lake Mead, near Las Vegas. At about 40 percent of capacity, it's the lowest it's been since it was built in the 1930s.

An appeals panel in Florida has upheld a deportation order against a former defense minister of El Salvador, who is alleged to have presided over human rights violations in that country, including the murders of four American churchwomen in 1980. Gen. Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova was allowed to retire in the U.S. in 1989. Now, a little known unit of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is trying to expel him as well as others charged with human rights abuses.

Back in December, following the fatal shooting of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama called for $75 million in funding for 50,000 body cameras to be used by police around the United States. The cameras record police activity, and their use is intended to boost accountability.

When you think of the federal government and computers, these days, the image that likely comes to mind is the botched rollout of the HealthCare.gov website.

If you want a sobering look at the scale of wildlife trafficking, just visit the National Wildlife Property Repository on the outskirts of Denver. In the middle of a national refuge is a cavernous warehouse stuffed with the remains of 1.5 million animals, whole and in parts.

They range from taxidermied polar bears to tiny sea horses turned into key chains. An area devoted to elephants is framed by a pair of enormous tusks.

At a Buddhist temple in downtown Denver, Junko Higdon is rehearsing a traditional song for one of the local Japanese community's biggest annual events.

Higdon is one of 30 amateur singers competing in two teams at this year's Kohaku Uta Gassen, which means, "red and white singing battle."

"White is for the men, red is for the women and whoever gets the most points out the teams wins the trophy," she says.

Shannon Conley, 19, has been sentenced to four years in prison for trying to travel to Turkey and work as a nurse for the extremist group ISIS. Conley reached a plea agreement over charges of trying to provide support for the terrorist group last fall.

When she was arrested, Conley was living in the Denver suburb of Arvada, where she had initially raised suspicions by visiting the grounds of a church and making notes and drawings. She was arrested months later, after several warnings from FBI agents.

The Transportation Security Administration found more than 2,000 firearms at the nation's airports last year — the overwhelming majority of them loaded, the Department of Homeland Security said today.

TSA agents discovered 2,212 firearms — or a little more than six a day — in carry-on bags; 83 percent of them were loaded, the department said.

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