Donald Trump

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Jena Griswold

Colorado is widely recognized as the gold standard for accessible and secure elections. With President Donald Trump openly stating his support for voter suppression tactics, and politicizing the U.S. Postal Service, KVNF's Gavin Dahl asked Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold what that means for her work as the top election official in the state. You can register to vote or update your registration at GoVoteColorado.gov.

Gavin Dahl

On Thursday morning, I sat down with Ray Langston, the chairman of the Montrose County Republican Party, on the front porch outside their headquarters. He says fundraising and organizing have been challenging during the coronavirus pandemic, particularly having to cancel the annual Lincoln Reagan Dinner, but they still plan to knock on doors for Donald Trump and work to get other candidates elected down the ballot. And he's confident that Lauren Boebert, who upset incumbent Scott Tipton in the Republican Primary, will be successful in the Third Congressional District race against Democrat Diane Mitsch Bush, a former state legislator from Steamboat Springs. 


KVNF Regional Newscast: December 6, 2016

Dec 6, 2016

  • Town Administrator candidates to visit Paonia
  • Oil and gas industry anticipates Trump's administration

KVNF Regional Newscast: November 14, 2016

Nov 14, 2016

  • Capitol Coverage of new leadership in state house
  • Inside Energy looks at Trump's promises to coal

This week, as part of the Nation Engaged project, NPR and some member stations will be talking about what the 2016 primary season has revealed about voters' confidence in the American electoral system.

Voters unhappy with the political system this year and unsure about whether their vote matters have big complaints how the country's two main political parties choose their candidates.

It's crunch time for the Republicans striving to be the nominee to campaign against Democrat Michael Bennet in Colorado's U.S. Senate race. The primary is still wide-open, and when the mail ballots are counted June 28, each candidate has a plausible shot of winning.

"I cannot pick a frontrunner. I couldn't even come close to picking a frontrunner," said political consultant Eric Sondermann.

"There's not a dominant figure in this race."

Colorado Republicans were mixed on the news that Ted Cruz and John Kasich dropped out of the presidential race. That leaves New York businessman Donald Trump as the apparent nominee. He has rattled the Republican Party establishment, and there's a lot of political calculating going on from the GOP as well as the Democrats.

The message from Colorado Republicans after the state convention was clear: We want Cruz. Much like with the state's Dems, who mostly lean toward Bernie Sanders, what happens if the preferred nominee isn't the final candidate?

KVNF Regional Newscast: Friday, May 6, 2016

May 6, 2016

  • CO 149 resurfacing project outside of Lake City starts
  • Colorado's Cruz-leaning GOP tries to make peace with Trump
  • Listen to U.S. coal production fall off a cliff

Colorado's Republican and Democratic caucuses will be held on Super Tuesday, March 1, 2016. There's a difference this year though. Colorado's Republican Party leaders canceled their traditional presidential preference poll at the precinct caucuses. The state's Democrats will conduct a poll.

2016 has brought record turnout and excitement to GOP presidential primary events – especially with the emergence of Donald Trump as the party's frontrunner. Why would the state's Republicans pass on that? We asked Steve House, the chairman of the Colorado Republican Party.

Colorado will take center stage Wednesday when the Republican Party's presidential hopefuls hold their third debate at the University of Colorado-Boulder. Along with a recent visit from Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders, CU students are saying all the activity is engaging younger voters ahead of 2016.

The state is politically purple, but Boulder is famously liberal, making the GOP debate a rare encounter with the conservative movement. Yet, mobilizing younger voters will be key to any electoral win, and both parties will be spending a lot of time in swing states like Colorado.