DUI

  • Colorado Farm & Food Alliance applauds review of Interior Dept oil & gas leasing programs
  • CPW studying why elk in Avalanche Creek herd are rejecting their young
  • Colorado Bureau of Investigation reports DUI arrests way down last year
  • Lawmakers again seek to ban single use plastic bags, styrofoam containers
  • Highway 50 construction project between Gunnison & Montrose continues to draw criticism
  • Zoom Boom: Kate Redmond speaks to realtor Carrie Soto about pandemic impacts on housing market

  

KVNF Regional Newscast: Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Apr 13, 2016

  • Bill to allow medical marijuana in schools clears state House committee
  • Bill seeks to fund emergency cleanup at legacy mining sites in Colorado
  • Conservation groups oppose Congressman Tipton’s Thompson Divide lease swap
  • USGS releases report on human-induced earthquakes
  • Law enforcement across Colorado participate in spring DUI enforcement campaign 

Law enforcement officials would love to have a clear way to tell when a driver is too drugged to drive. But the decades of experience the country has in setting limits for alcohol have turned out to be rather useless so far because the mind-altering compound in cannabis, THC, dissolves in fat, whereas alcohol dissolves in water.

Newscast

  • SMPA to give back $1.7 million to customers
  • Mesa County checks to see if anyone watches public access
  • US Forest Service releases plan for beetle kill, aspen decline  
  • Gov. Hickenlooper signs DUI bill into law
  • Biking festival returns to Paonia
  • Grand Junction resumes issuing drivers licenses to undocumented immigrants 

State lawmakers waited until the last minute to decide some of the biggest issues hanging over the capitol for the 2015 legislative session. They worked overtime to get everything wrapped up before a Wednesday midnight.

Reducing the number of standardized tests public school children take has been a top priority for lawmakers in both parties this session. The Governor even mentioned it during his January State of the State Address. Despite overall agreement on the problem, the issue wasn't resolved until the final moments of the session, after months of negotiations and numerous bills on the topic.

Test reform wasn't alone, priorities such as a felony DUI bill, reauthorization of the Office of Consumer Counsel, a change in the law for rain barrels, and a salary increase for elected officials were all on the docket in the waning moments of the General Assembly.

Colorado will soon have a felony DUI law on the books. On the final day of the legislative session the Senate passed House Bill 1043 [.pdf] to create a felony DUI for habitual drunken driving offenders. Legislators had failed to pass it for several years, this time it passed the Senate 34-1.

"There are some holes this legislation is never going to fill there are family members we're not going to get back, and tragedies we can't undo," said Senator Mike Johnston (D-Denver) the bill's sponsor.

Only a handful of states don't have a felony DUI law. Some lawmakers were worried about the costs of incarceration, other legislators wanted to make sure the state provided proper treatments and interventions before giving jail time.

Governor John Hickenlooper received a warm reception from lawmakers in both parties during his annual State of the State Address. The Governor talked about policies he wants the legislature to adopt, announced a few new initiatives and urged lawmakers to face facts about the challenges facing Colorado.

During his roughly 45-minute speech Hickenlooper highlighted many of his budget proposals, such as giving more money to higher education and K-12 schools. He also pledged to look at ways to creatively fund roads and bridges, and threw his support behind a felony DUI law. Colorado is one of four states without one.