geology

The magnetic north pole is moving. It has, in fact crossed the prime meridian. The British Geological Survey and the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, which update the World's Magnetic Model, have had to accelerate their process in order to keep up because magnetic north has accelerated to moving 37 miles a year. On this week’s Local Motion KVNF’s Kate Redmond speaks with Greg Baker, assistant professor of geology at Colorado Mesa University and also Dr. Dave Noe, a professional geologist and lecturer living in Paonia.

Western Slope Skies - Geology of the Moon

Jan 22, 2021
NASA

Step outside on a clear night this week and gaze upward. You’ll see a bright gibbous Moon – or a full Moon on January 28.

  • President Trump signs Colorado River drought management plan
  • Traveling geologist visits Crawford, talks history of North Fork Valley
  • Lawmakers grappling with new procedures to deal with complaints
  • Flood danger on West End greater due to large runoff

Local Motion: The Deep Past of the North Fork

May 10, 2016
Dave Noe

Knowledge of the land can help us plan a road or know where to plant an orchard, but the rocks also tell a story of this place - a story millions of years in the making.

On this week's Local Motion, KVNF's Laura Palmisano takes us on a drive around Grand Mesa with geologist Andres Aslan. On the drive, Aslan talks about the geological history of the mesa and why it's landslide prone. He also discusses May's massive landslide on the edge of the Grand Mesa near Collbran that claimed the lives of three men.

Grand Mesa
Laura Palmisano

May’s massive landslide on the edge of the Grand Mesa near Collbran claimed the lives of three men. 

Geologists I spoke to said landslides in western Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region are a normal occurrence because the earth is dynamic and erosion is happening all around us. 

To get a better understanding of why experts told me the nature of the flat-topped mountain is to slide, I took a drive on Grand Mesa with a geologist. 

I met Andres Aslan, a Colorado Mesa University professor and geologist, at the visitor center on the mesa.