Infrastructure

  • Russell Stover facility in Montrose will reopen as Western Slope Food & Innovation Center
  • District 51 summer extension enrolls 2500 students
  • Telluride Blues & Brews announces schedule, plans for 100% capacity
  • Vail Fire Chief Mark Novak calls for more urgent fire mitigation
  • Kate Redmond speaks with US Senator Michael Bennet about new disaster mitigation legislation he's pushing to include in President Biden's Jobs & Infrastructure Plan

Courtesy of CDOT

Lisa Schoch, environmental protection specialist and senior historian for CDOT's environmental programs branch, explains it is the design that makes the Gunnison River Bridge on Highway 92 near Delta historic.

Courtesy of Colorado Parks & Wildlife

  • Gov. Polis amends, extends mask mandate
  • Lawmakers send $34B budget to Governor
  • Gov. Polis signed 19 bills last week
  • 39-year old woman killed by bear near Durango
  • Colorado River cleanup finds surprising items including tires, shopping carts
  • Drinking water & wastewater bill passes U.S. Senate
  • Former Speaker of the House Andrew Romanoff talks about new job at Family Visitors Program

Gavin Dahl

On Tuesday, Colorado U.S. Senator Michael Bennet introduced new legislation he’s calling The RESILIENT Act that is designed to dramatically improve how rural communities can secure federal infrastructure funding to develop new projects. 

 

For Sen. Bennet, this is a signature piece of legislation. 

KVNF Regional Newscast: Monday, Jan. 12, 2015

Jan 12, 2015

Newscast

  • City of Montrose saves money on trash
  • A conversation with Temple Grandin about autism
  • Infrastructure becomes focus for Colorado lawmakers

The past few years have been California's driest on record. Forecasters predict that punishing droughts like the current one could become the new norm.

The state uses water rationing and a 90-year-old water distribution system to cope until the rains come. The system is a huge network of dams, canals and pipes that move water from the places it rains and snows to places it typically doesn't, like farms and cities.

JGColorado via Flickr (CC BY-NC)

In the wake of the historic Front Range Floods, many climate experts and researchers admit that while they’ve known of the potential for dangerous flooding in the Boulder area for some time now, hardly anybody could’ve predicted such a large-scale disaster.

We decided to look into what the floods might tell us about the future of massive storms, and whether the events of last week might change our definitions of "rare" weather events.