Lake Mead

Lake Mead
U.S. Geological Survey

  • Mesa County Commissioners name former Secretary of State Wayne Williams their new top election official, as current Secretary of State's investigation into Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters continues
  • Funding begins to flow as shortage of licensed childcare facilities intensifies
  • Governor Polis urges CDPHE to mandate vaccines for personnel caring for vulnerable populations
  • Climate change makes it hard to predict when water shortage in lower Colorado River basin will end
  • Kate Redmond speaks with Delta Hospital pulmonologist Sara Knutson about COVID-19

Kathleen Shannon / KDNK

  • Orchard City declares first stage of drought, meaning new fees & regulations
  • Vaccine supply outpacing demand in Mesa County
  • Pandemic EBT program extended for 2021 academic year, low-income families will receive $136/month per student learning remotely, $82/month per student in hybrid model
  • New report shows Colorado River reservoirs will drop to lowest levels ever this year
  • From KDNK: Town of Marble struggling with lack of enforcement for ATV overuse 

  

Brett Seymour / National Park Service Submerged Resources Center

  • Congressmember Lauren Boebert is speaking in Montrose at Turn of the Century Saloon tonight at 6
  • Paonia police officers are moonlighting as independent contractors, in Paonia vehicles, for Hotchkiss Marshal Dan Miller who says he's down two officers due to unexplained paid administrative leave
  • H2O Radio reports that as Lake Mead levels fall, the draw to see a crashed WWII bomber could harm it

  

The historic four-year drought in California has been grabbing the headlines lately, but there's a much bigger problem facing the West: the now 14-year drought gripping the Colorado River basin.

One of the most stunning places to see its impact is at the nation's largest reservoir, Lake Mead, near Las Vegas. At about 40 percent of capacity, it's the lowest it's been since it was built in the 1930s.

NOTE: In the on-air version of this story we incorrectly stated the date of a U.S. Bureau of Reclamation announcement about Colorado River cut-backs to lower basin states. That announcement happened in 2013, not this year. (8/26/14)

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation announced this month water releases from Lake Powell to Lake Mead will increase next year, after historically low releases in 2014. Lake Mead has reached record low levels this summer. The Colorado River supplies these large reservoirs. At a water conference in Snowmass Village last week, drought and the Colorado River were discussed. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.