law enforcement

This week on Local Motion, Gavin Dahl speaks to author Julian Rubinstein. The Holly: Five Bullets, One Gun, and the Struggle to Save An American Neighborhood examines the role of law enforcement informants as gang violence continues in 'invisible Denver' and corrects the record on anti-gang activist Terrance Roberts.

Juan Labreche / AP

  • COVID hospitalizations increase this week in Colorado as overall case numbers stopped declining
  • DMEA investigating own CEO, who is on leave of absence 
  • DA charges Kiowa County deputy in rare prosecution of an officer for on-duty killing described in '3 Bullets to the Back' investigative article
  • VP Harris visited Denver on Tuesday
  • Deb Haaland confirmed as new Interior Secretary
  • Kate Redmond reports strict nursing home lockdowns are lifting

Delta County Sheriff's Department

On this edition of Local Motion, we’ll discuss two Delta County ballot measures. Delta County residents are being asked to vote on a Back the Badge measure that would institute a special public safety tax to help fund law enforcement. And the  towns of Paonia and Cedaredge are each considering allowing sales of medical and recreational marijuana, and taxing those sales to create additional revenue. 

Courtesy of Delta County Sheriff

  • When asked about campaign finance complaint filed against Back the Badge campaign, Delta County Sheriff Mark Taylor tells KVNF's Jodi Peterson that he made a mistake 
  • Part two of KVNF's interview with Democratic congressional candidate Diane Mitsch Bush

Gavin Dahl

A unique collaboration between the Center for Mental Health and local law enforcement agencies offers frontline intervention to help diffuse conflicts for those experiencing a mental health crisis. Now the Montrose Police Department has acquired a brand new vehicle for the co-responder through state grant funds which is expected to have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the program. KVNF's Gavin Dahl spoke to Chief Clinical Officer Amanda Jones and Montrose Police commander Matt Smith to learn more.

 

  • 22 states join Colorado's effort to get SCOTUS to rule on election case
  • Reports lists several Western Slope hospitals among the best in state
  • Memorial for slain law officer in Hinsdale County recalls service, changes
  • Delta County Health Department wants residents to wash their hands

Even with Cliven Bundy and many of his militia supporters in jail, anger toward the federal government is still running high in some parts of the West.

Clashes between ranchers and federal land managers over grazing rights are continuing. In southern Utah, things have gotten so bad lately that some local sheriffs have threatened to arrest federal rangers who try to close forest roads and cut off access to ranchers and other users.

Sometimes it's hard to tell whether Garfield County Sheriff James "Danny" Perkins is serious or pulling your leg.

License plate scanners have become a fact of life. They're attached to traffic lights, on police cars — even "repo" staff use them. All those devices have created a torrent of data, raising new concerns about how it's being stored and analyzed.

Bryce Newell's laptop is filled with the comings and goings of Seattle residents. The data comes from the city's license plate scanner, acquired from the police through public disclosure requests. He plugs in a license plate number, uncovering evidence of long-forgotten errands.

Grand Junction Photography Project Looks Beyond The Badge

May 14, 2015
Grand Junction Police Department
Nathan Lopez Photography

This week is National Police Week. It is an occasion to honor officers who died in the line of duty. 

The time of remembrance this year comes on the heels of protests against police in major cities across the U.S. and a national debate on police tactics. 

In a local effort to increase understanding between law enforcement and the public, a Western Slope photographer is trying to get people to look beyond the badge and see the person in uniform.

Photographer Nathan Lopez moved to Grand Junction seven months ago from Oregon.

The arrest of South Carolina police Officer Michael Slager, who shot and killed Walter Scott in North Charleston this week, came shortly after the release of a cellphone video recorded by an eyewitness.

The filming of police by civilians has also sparked controversy, and it often causes confusion about what is legal.

More than 1.3 million people are incarcerated in state prisons in this country, and keeping those prisons running requires tens of thousands of corrections officers. But right now, some states are facing major staffing shortages.

Much of this shortfall is because of the strong economy, but recruiters also are struggling with the job's cultural stigma.

Cadets at Wyoming's Department of Corrections Training Academy are practicing how they'll handcuff prisoners. In a few weeks this scenario will be very real, but right now everyone is pretty relaxed.