Montana

Talkin Music: Satsang

Jun 3, 2021
Greyson Christian Plate

Satsang's lead singer and songwriter Drew McManus calls into KVNF from his home in Montana. McManus talks with Kori Stanton about the band's upcoming record "All. Right. Now." which comes out at the end of June and features Trevor Hall and G. Love.

  • Mesa County, Montrose County, Delta County, Ouray County face COVID spikes
  • Governor Polis presented his billion dollar stimulus proposal to state budget planners Thursday
  • Colorado State Patrol seeks feedback in a new survey
  • Senator Jon Tester, the only Montana Democrat left in statewide office next year, talks with reporter Nate Hegyi about how progressives can win rural elections

Chad Reich

  • Open Enrollment is now available through Connect for Health Colorado
  • Ouray Silver Mines a COVID outbreak site
  • Rocky Mountain National Park mostly reopen though East Troublesome Fire only half contained
  • New job training opportunities emerge in Colorado as a result of the pandemic
  • An entire county health department staff resigned in Montana last week
  • Chad Reich reports on the Capitol Christmas tree cutting ceremony near Montrose

Butte is an old mining town, tucked away in the southwest corner of Montana with a population of about 34,000. Locals enjoy many things you can't find elsewhere — campgrounds a quick drive from downtown and gorgeous mountain ranges nearby. But in Butte, as in much of rural America, advanced medical care is absent.

People in Butte who experience serious trauma or need specialty care rely on air ambulance flights to get them the help they need.

Something unusual is happening in America's wilderness — some animals and plants are moving away from their native habitats. The reason is a warming climate. It's getting too hot where they live.

Species that can't migrate may perish, so some biologists say we need to move them. But they admit that's a roll of the dice that violates a basic rule of conservation: If you want to keep the natural world "natural," you don't want to move plants and animals around willy-nilly.

Colstrip, Mont., is true to its name — it exists because of coal.

"Our coal's getting deeper, like everywhere else, because everybody's mining. They're getting into the deeper stuff," says Kevin Murphy, who has worked in the Rosebud Mine for 15 years running a bulldozer in the open pits.

Everything about the mine is enormous, especially the dragline, a machine as big as a ship with a giant boom that extends 300 feet up into the air. The dragline perches on the lip of the pit, scraping away hundreds of feet of rocky soil to reveal the black seam of coal below.