Oil & Gas

U.S. Census Bureau

  • Interior Department restarts oil & gas leasing on public lands while fighting lawsuit by industry
  • Colorado proposes new transportation planning standards to reduce pollution
  • Delta, Montrose among 16 recipients of CDOT funds to revitalize Main Streets
  • Palisade faces criticism over regulation of retail pot shops
  • Ruedi Reservoir so low Aspen could struggle to generate hydro power
  • Water shortage declared for lower Colorado River Basin
  • Kate Redmond reports on release of 2020 Census numbers

  

Julia Caulfield / KOTO

  • Secretary of State requests inspection of Mesa County election equipment due to potential security breach
  • Oil & gas company KP Kauffman facing fines & COGCC hearing for long list of alleged violations
  • Montrose City Council commits $500k to support improvements at 3 mobile home parks
  • 4 local businesses buying Ouray Chalet Inn to repurpose for workforce housing
  • KOTO's Julia Caulfield reports on Telluride's short-term rental tax to fund affordable housing efforts

  

Pexels-shvets production

  • CDPHE flies airborne survey at oil and gas sites on the Front Range
  • Interior Secretary Haaland visits Grand Junction on Friday
  • EPA includes new chemicals in latest draft of drinking water contaminants
  • Domestic violence survivors in Roaring Fork Valley get help

Lucas Turner

The 12-thousand-plus acre Oil Springs Fire south of Rangely is now contained. But previously, exceptional drought conditions and heavy winds fueled extreme fire behavior that forced emergency evacuations, power shut offs, road closures, and threatened a large natural gas processing facility. Lucas Turner, from the Rio Blanco Herald Times newspaper, produced a feature for KVNF about the state's largest fire.

  

  

Lucas Turner

  • Little Blue Creek Canyon worker Ricardo Batista died Tuesday when a huge rock fell on his excavator
  • MCSD Superintendent Carrie Stephenson now says mascot changes at Montrose High, Centennial Middle may cost $500k-$800k
  • Rio Blanco Herald Times reporter Lucas Turner reports for KVNF on the firefighting efforts to contain the Oil Springs Fire near Rangely, which came within a mile of a large natural gas processing facility

High Country News

On this week's Local Motion, KVNF's Kate Redmond speaks with High Country News correspondent Nick Bowlin about his article on energy companies leaving Colorado with billions of dollars in oil and gas cleanup. Plus, KVNF's Gavin Dahl hears from HCN associate editor Paige Blankenbuehler about the ideas suburban second graders have for helping CPW manage the reintroduction of wolves.

  • Colorado Farm & Food Alliance applauds review of Interior Dept oil & gas leasing programs
  • CPW studying why elk in Avalanche Creek herd are rejecting their young
  • Colorado Bureau of Investigation reports DUI arrests way down last year
  • Lawmakers again seek to ban single use plastic bags, styrofoam containers
  • Highway 50 construction project between Gunnison & Montrose continues to draw criticism
  • Zoom Boom: Kate Redmond speaks to realtor Carrie Soto about pandemic impacts on housing market

  

Colorado State Forest Service

  • Delta County School Board votes to consolidate North Fork high schools to Hotchkiss
  • Pre-register for COVID vaccines in Delta County
  • Colorado Rockies will welcome fans to Coors Field in April
  • Abandoned oil & gas wells pollute air and groundwater, with profits privatized, damages socialized
  • Conservation advocate Nada Culver appointed to BLM post
  • Capitol statue will honor Sand Creek Massacre victims
  • Gunnison County home to severe bark beetle infestations
  • Montrose artist Lewis Williams embarks on 4000-mile bike trip

Conservatives for Responsible Stewardship

  • Delta County Memorial Hospital & 13 clinics rebranding as Delta Health
  • Animas River records record low flow, again
  • Elijah McClain: Investigation criticizes Aurora police & 'failed' internal investigation
  • Lauren Boebert amends FEC filing on mileage reimbursements
  • Critics: FCC awarded SpaceX nearly $900m for untested rural broadband project
  • Luke Runyon: Rivers in the southwest impacted by climate change
  • Kate Redmond interviews Conservatives for Responsible Stewardship president David Jenkins

Paonia Eagles, Football, Sports, High School
Tennille Van Vleet

  • Two more Coloradans died in avalanches this weekend
  • Paonia notifies residents of potential lead contamination
  • Colorado Creative Industries awards over $7M in arts grants
  • Fossil fuel interests fund Republican lawmakers who publicly oppose freeze of leasing on public lands
  • State lawmakers resume legislative session tomorrow
  • Kate Redmond speaks to DCSD assistant superintendent Kurt Clay and task force member and parent Jon Hickam about consolidation of K-12 schools in the North Fork Valley

  

  • Cedaredge Trustees refine application process for marijuana shops
  • CDOT unveils new Bustang route from Telluride to Grand Junction
  • Avalanche claims 3 lives of backcountry skiers near Ophir Pass
  • Center for Western Priorities policy director Jesse Prentice-Dunn says the sky is not falling for the oil & gas industry
  • KVNF's Kate Redmond hears from Hotchkiss Trustee Mary Hockenberry about revitalization plans including a vision for the Public Works building

If you tune in to the news just about anywhere, you might be under the impression that the election of President Joe Biden means the sky is falling for the oil and gas industry. KVNF news director Gavin Dahls hear why Center for Western Priorities policy director Jesse Prentice-Dunn begs to differ.

 

Maeve Conran / KGNU

  • Delta Libraries closed temporarily this week in response to a belligerent man refusing to wear a mask
  • Paonia Town Council renewed Corinne Ferguson's contract
  • Colorado West Land Trust announced conservation of ranch land near Black Canyon
  • Sabotage of Aspen gas lines continues to vex investigators
  • KGNU's Maeve Conran reports a proposal for what could be the state's largest fracking site is drawing community opposition in Boulder County, including high schoolers adding their voices to the chorus of protest

  

Mark Duggan / KSUT

  • More doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are on the way to Colorado
  • PPE supplier reaches settlement with Colorado Attorney General over price gouging, misleading claims
  • Montrose County School District public information officer Matt Jenkins explains new rapid COVID testing teachers can use at home
  • KSUT's Mark Duggan explores what the Biden administration's pause of new oil and gas leasing on public lands means for one drilling proposal in the San Juan National Forest

Chad Reich

  • Paonia's working group is closing in on a draft ordinance to regulate marijuana shops. KVNF's Kate Redmond speaks with Paonia Town Trustee Michelle Pattison to get an update.
  • A Bureau of Land Management field office on the Western Slope decided to open 95% of lands under its watch to oil and gas leasing. But the State of Colorado and Western Slope conservation groups are suing to try to stop the lease sales. For the Rocky Mountain Community Radio fossil fuel reporting collaboration, Chad Reich reports.

Maeve Conran / KGNU

  • Mesa County Economic Development group hopes BLM headquarters stays in Grand Junction
  • X Games will proceed in Aspen with no spectators
  • Western Colorado Food & Farm Forum kicks off with virtual screening tonight
  • Governor Polis urges hospitals to use now the COVID vaccines reserved for second doses
  • KGNU's Maeve Conran reports one researcher shining a light on the impact of fossil fuel emissions on air quality has become a target of the industry

  

Maeve Conran / KGNU

  • Wilderness Workshop leads conservation groups blocking 53 fracking leases in the Piceance Basin
  • Animas River sees lowest flow in recorded history as southwest remains in exceptional drought
  • Scott Franz reports state lawmakers are feeling on edge as they prepare to return to work in Denver
  • The state has overhauled oil & gas rules, giving local communities more authority to regulate the industry, but as Maeve Conran of KGNU reports, 2 Front Range counties have radically different ideas of what local control means

  

Lone Cone Library

  • Grand Junction City Council working on marijuana ballot measures for April election
  • CDOT will spend some of $150M relief funds to improve Hwy 50 between Delta & Grand Junction
  • Teachers not expected to start receiving vaccines until March, state providing rapid testing kits
  • Governor says residents age 70+ will soon have easier time scheduling COVID vaccinations
  • KOTO's Matt Hoisch explores what it means for local governments and public services when oil and gas revenues become more uncertain

  

Daniel Rayzel / KSJD

  • BLM approved 226 gas wells to be drilled 15 miles NE of Paonia, so SG Interests & Gunnison Energy will proceed with their Bull Mountain Master Energy Plan
  • Delta County Commissioners approved a new Land Use code on Tuesday, but citizen journalist JoAnn Kalenek says the maps were never completely and accurately published for review
  • KSJD's Daniel Rayzel reports dark skies advocates say mitigation for light pollution is too often ignored in SE Utah 

  

  • Post-Thanksgiving COVID spike not as severe in Mesa County as expected
  • Grand Valley Transit workers vote no confidence in their GM
  • Hotchkiss trustees approve $1.2M budget for 2021, new headgate at Carl Smith Reservoir
  • Senator Michael Bennet introduced one last bill, the Outdoor Restoration Force Act
  • Eric Galatas reports this Sunday is deadline for food banks to apply for new state grants
  • Jodi Peterson checks in with Natasha Legere for reaction to new COGCC oil & gas rules

  

Colorado Avalanche Information Center

  • Mesa, Delta, Montrose, San Miguel Counties will begin vaccinating frontline health workers next week
  • Connect for Health Colorado extends insurance sign-up deadline to Friday
  • Audit finds red flags at Colorado State Judiciary Administration
  • KBUT: Avalanche forecasters concerned about stability of this season's snowpack
  • Avalanche education courses see record enrollment numbers
  • Jodi Peterson gets oil & gas industry reaction to new COGCC rules

  

Lucas Turner / KDNK

  • Montrose School District employee arrested, accused of embezzling
  • Montrose County approves $92M budget for 2021, Ouray County approves $15M budget
  • Nicholas Aldridge ID'd as person found dead in the Adobes
  • Forest Service: Northern Spotted Owl deserves endangered species protection
  • KDNK's Lucas Turner reports oil & gas spills in Piceance Basin topped 700,000 gallons last year

  • Oil production dropped 13% during the pandemic, largest drop in 20 years
  • Colorado food pantries reporting 2-3 times normal demand for food, 1/3 served never needed help before
  • Research from Yellowstone backs up theory that wolves may be effective way to control spread of chronic wasting disease
  • Will Walkey from KHOL reports on new threats to Wyoming's wind rush potential

KVNF Regional Newscast: September 30, 2020

Sep 30, 2020
Bureau of Land Management

  • Watchdog group challenges new Delta County ag plan
  • Toxic algae spreading in Blue Mesa Reservoir
  • COGCC approves new rules for oil & gas 
  • Governor warns COVID numbers are still too high
  • Climate change causing reduction of aspen trees in Colorado
  • What's next for BLM with acting director Pendley ousted by judge?

  

GRIZZLY CREEK FIRE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM

  • John Hickenlooper campaigns in Grand Junction
  • Colorado Air Quality Commission will require pollution monitoring at new oil & gas wells
  • Curecanti Rec Area getting major upgrade
  • Unemployment rates high in our region
  • Activists want climate questions in the debates
  • State climatologist Russ Schumacher talks wildfires

  

  • The Pine Gulch Fire was at 9,200 acres as of Wednesday afternoon and only 5% contained
  • A new report finds the worst of the COVID-19 recession may be over for Colorado
  • COGCC voted Tuesday to raise mill levy for oil & gas companies
  • Colorado voters may see as many as 11 statewide ballot questions in November
  • Public health officers across the country keep quitting

KVNF Regional Newscast: Friday, Oct. 17, 2014

Oct 17, 2014

  • Oil And Gas Money Flows Into Colorado Counties 
  • Ebola Plane Lands In Denver
  • Ski Season Starts In Colorado
  • A Debate Between Gardner And Udall, Plus Recent Polling
  • Broncos With Fines After Sunday’s Game

The Colorado Oil & Gas Association has dropped its lawsuit against the city of Longmont.

One of the more striking images during the September flood was of inundated oil and gas pads, washed out earthen berms and overturned storage tanks. In all, over 48,000 gallons of oil and condensate spilled.

While changes have been made in the industry to prepare for another flood, so far, they’re strictly voluntary.

Governor John Hickenlooper’s office said he’s still in discussions about whether to call lawmakers back to the state capitol for a special session on oil and gas issues. The goal would be to pass a compromise bill and avoid a fight at the ballot box.