Pine Gulch Fire

Wyoming Hotshots

There is a new season in the west: fire season! We have always had wild fire in our landscapes but fires are now coming much earlier, burning hotter and often leaving catastrophic impacts. Like all living systems, it's not just one thing, but an interconnected and compounding set of environmental and social issues that are causing these fires to be so much worse than they were. 

Lon&Queta/Creative Commons

With major wildfires in Colorado this summer and a hotter, drier climate predicted across the West, many of us are wondering what our beloved forests will look like in a few decades.

A new University of Colorado Boulder-led study offers a glimpse into the future, suggesting that when forests burn across the Southern Rocky Mountains, many will not grow back and will instead convert to grasslands and shrublands.

KVNF spoke to Kyle Rodman, the study's lead author, about what landscapes might look like after the Pine Gulch and Grizzly Creek fires.

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  • The Pine Gulch Fire is expected to continued growing
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  • The Pine Gulch Fire was at 9,200 acres as of Wednesday afternoon and only 5% contained
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  • COGCC voted Tuesday to raise mill levy for oil & gas companies
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  • Public health officers across the country keep quitting

Courtesy of Carly Latcham / Zoe Dohnal

  • Montrose School District seeks survey input on Return to Learn plan
  • Pine Gulch Fire spreading rapidly north of Grand Junction
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  • KOTO's Matt Hoisch examines parenting infants during a pandemic

Judy Fahys

  • Smoke from area fires, including the Pine Gulch Fire in Mesa County, is impacting our area
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  • Judy Fahys reports for InsideClimateNews about humpback chubs in the Grand Canyon