teachers

Gavin Dahl

  • Colorado's COVID death toll surpasses 6,000, as 90% of teachers have received first dose of vaccine
  • High winds destroyed tipis at Ute Museum in Montrose
  • History Colorado grants $25k to Montrose for cultural site survey in Tortilla Flats
  • Colorado House passes bill requiring gun storage
  • Republican Marc Catlin responds to Governor's Meat Out Day, calls for Meat In
  • DCSD superintendent Caryn Gibson spoke to North Fork Rotary club about high school consolidation and outlined district properties she'd like to sell

  

Outdoors International

  • Ela Family Farms facing devastating fruit tree losses
  • Montrose City Council approves $16M for new police station
  • Ridgway School District declines Telluride Foundation's request to donate field for affordable housing
  • 75% of Colorado school staff now vaccinated
  • USFS accepting comments on pine beetle management, email nicole.hutt at usda.gov
  • Restaurants will likely be able to keep delivering alcohol after the pandemic
  • Andrew Taylor, Colorado Parks & Wildlife, talks about removing high fences to help deer and elk

Scott Franz

  • Colorado teachers now have rapid COVID self-tests from the state
  • CDC says ventilation indoors can cut down spread of COVID, but what makes for good ventilation?
  • Capitol Coverage: Colorado lawmakers considering $1B stimulus proposal in response to pandemic
  • Paonia town administrator Corinne Ferguson discusses notices sent to residents last week about lead exceeding permitted levels at six specific testing sites, and outlines next steps

Mark Duggan / KSUT

  • More doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are on the way to Colorado
  • PPE supplier reaches settlement with Colorado Attorney General over price gouging, misleading claims
  • Montrose County School District public information officer Matt Jenkins explains new rapid COVID testing teachers can use at home
  • KSUT's Mark Duggan explores what the Biden administration's pause of new oil and gas leasing on public lands means for one drilling proposal in the San Juan National Forest

Lone Cone Library

  • Grand Junction City Council working on marijuana ballot measures for April election
  • CDOT will spend some of $150M relief funds to improve Hwy 50 between Delta & Grand Junction
  • Teachers not expected to start receiving vaccines until March, state providing rapid testing kits
  • Governor says residents age 70+ will soon have easier time scheduling COVID vaccinations
  • KOTO's Matt Hoisch explores what it means for local governments and public services when oil and gas revenues become more uncertain

  

Laurie Milford

On this week’s edition, we’re taking a look at how the school year is going so far. The COVID-19  pandemic has upended so much of our daily life, and that’s especially evident in education, where schools, teachers, parents and students have had to adjust to new procedures, changed expectations and different ways of learning.

Listen up, cub reporters. Lesson 1: Never miss an opportunity to catch a good story. I was doing important hop research at my local craft beer emporium, aka my bar.

"This red IPA is great. What is this again?" I asked the bartender.

"That's Line 51. From Oakland. The owner, P.T., does it part time. He has a day job." What's he do? I asked. "He's a schoolteacher."

Bingo! Secret teachers, you can't hide from this NPR Ed sleuth, no sir.