U.S. Senate

Courtesy of Colorado Parks & Wildlife

  • Gov. Polis amends, extends mask mandate
  • Lawmakers send $34B budget to Governor
  • Gov. Polis signed 19 bills last week
  • 39-year old woman killed by bear near Durango
  • Colorado River cleanup finds surprising items including tires, shopping carts
  • Drinking water & wastewater bill passes U.S. Senate
  • Former Speaker of the House Andrew Romanoff talks about new job at Family Visitors Program

Courtesy of Anti-Defamation League

  • Montrose Planning Commission approves HUB housing development with conditions
  • CASA completes capital campaign for new Delta facility
  • Paonia in Motion campaign launches to enhance public spaces
  • Gray wolf collared by CPW before fleeing back to Wyoming
  • Senator John Hickenlooper announces 4 committee assignments
  • Mountain West News Bureau: Among the right-wing groups taking part in the insurrection on January 6th, Oath Keepers was founded in our region

Roberta McGowan / The Sopris Sun

  • Colorado sending National Guard troops to inauguration
  • Governor launches Greenhouse Gas Pollution Reduction roadmap
  • Congresswoman Lauren Boebert's communications director resigns
  • Senator John Hickenlooper announces 7 regional offices, including Grand Junction, Durango
  • Colorado lawmakers adjourned for at least a month after 3-day 'soft opening'
  • KBUT's Christopher Biddle reports on the fight for clean drinking water in Somerset

  

  • Cory Gardner gave his farewell speech in the US Senate on Tuesday
  • CASA plans new facility in Delta
  • Colorado Parks & Wildlife crack 2019 poaching case on Uncompahgre Plateau
  • Body found Saturday in the Adobes area
  • Governors in the west want federal support for wildfire restoration
  • Jodi Peterson reports CU-Boulder researchers say COVID testing could help stop virus spread

  

  • Mesa County, Montrose County, Delta County, Ouray County face COVID spikes
  • Governor Polis presented his billion dollar stimulus proposal to state budget planners Thursday
  • Colorado State Patrol seeks feedback in a new survey
  • Senator Jon Tester, the only Montana Democrat left in statewide office next year, talks with reporter Nate Hegyi about how progressives can win rural elections

National Park Service

  • Montrose School District reports 4 more positive tests at Cottonwood Elementary
  • Doubts about Great American Outdoors Act implementation by Trump administration
  • CORE Act will finally get Senate committee hearing 
  • Ranchers and county commissioners speak in favor of CORE Act
  • Backlash to geotagging on public lands could be changing

  

  • Conservation groups sue BLM over Uncompahgre Resource Management Plan
  • 4 marijuana ballot items qualify in Delta County
  • New documents show Interior Dept wanted to manage bison like cattle
  • On Tuesday, Michael Bennet called on William Perry Pendley to resign from BLM in a speech on Senate floor

Judy Fahys

  • Smoke from area fires, including the Pine Gulch Fire in Mesa County, is impacting our area
  • A second person has died from COVID-19 in Mesa County
  • Western Slope fruit growers are feeling impacts from the April freeze
  • Democrats need four seats to take the U.S. Senate
  • Colorado voters may only get to see one U.S. Senate debate this year
  • Judy Fahys reports for InsideClimateNews about humpback chubs in the Grand Canyon

Gavin Dahl

On Tuesday, Colorado U.S. Senator Michael Bennet introduced new legislation he’s calling The RESILIENT Act that is designed to dramatically improve how rural communities can secure federal infrastructure funding to develop new projects. 

 

For Sen. Bennet, this is a signature piece of legislation. 

  • Montrose Memorial Hospital receives two new grants to help offset revenue drop
  • 12 Mesa County residents became U.S. citizens on Monday
  • Body of missing man, Conrad Earnest, found deceased by search and rescue crew on Miracle Rock Trail
  • June was a record month for housing sales, reports Mountain West News Bureau
  • U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet introduced new rural infrastructure legislation called the RESILIENT Act today

Breathtakingly broad as its jurisdiction may be, the U.S. Senate does not usually vote on the validity of scientific theories.

This week, it did. And science won. The Senate voted that climate change is real, and not a hoax. The vote was 98-1.

The vote was about an amendment to the bill approving the Keystone XL pipeline. The near-unanimity of the climate change judgment was notable, because so many senators have cast doubt on ideas of "global warming."

Administering the oath of office to the U.S. Senate sounds like a mundane job. That task falls to the vice president.

But the current occupant of that office, Joe Biden, turns it into an event that's so joyful, and so lacking the partisan rancor that typically dominates American politics, that it's almost hard to believe that you're watching a scene from Washington.

Every two years, a third of the U.S. Senate is elected — and there's a formal oath-taking on the Senate floor. But then, right afterward, each senator takes his or her turn in a ceremonial swearing in.