vaccinations

Grassroots TV / KDNK

  • Colorado COVID hospitalizations at highest point of 2021
  • Outbreaks in Colorado schools have risen for 8 weeks in a row with 3000 children testing positive so far
  • New study shows lotteries did not encourage vaccination
  • BLM's largest wild horse gather in history underway in Wyoming
  • Water experts testify on drought in Congress
  • Colorado legislators may raise property taxes on short-term rentals, let cyclists cruise through stop signs
  • VP of Garfield County Re-2 school board resigns in face of threats, intimidation

  

Gavin Dahl

  • Redistricting Commission selects new Congressional maps at marathon meeting
  • Delta County Schools relaxing COVID protocols today 
  • Ouray School revises mask policy due to high vaccination rate
  • Low enrollment in state's school testing program
  • Author & activist Rivera Sun talks about nonviolence trainings
  • Pamela Friend, owner of Star Drive-In Theatre in Montrose, wraps up season

Allergy & Asthma Network

  • I-70 reopened Saturday
  • SOS decertifies Mesa County election equipment
  • Learning Council hopes to buy building in Paonia
  • DCSD releases North Fork Miners logo in time for 1st day of school
  • AEG to require vaccinations for all concert attendees starting October 1
  • As delta variant surges, cities bring back some COVID restrictions, but rural conservatives push back

  

Courtesy of Teya Cranson

  • CDC investigated elder care facilities in Mesa County, where unvaccinated staff are believed to be bringing COVID-19 to work
  • CPW held public input session on wolf reintroduction in Montrose
  • For 3rd time in 3 years, buying water from Ruedi Reservoir to offset low streamflow in Colorado River
  • School District 51 hires new director of equity & inclusion
  • Families in Colorado are already benefiting from advance child tax credit payments
  • Paradise Theatre to screen new doc Where We Belong by local filmmaker Teya Cranson

Centennial Middle School

  • Montrose Indians, Centennial Braves to change mascots by end of next school year
  • COVID made it more difficult to count low-income kids
  • Federal Court rules filming of police in public is protected by 1st amendment
  • Mesa County Public Health expanding COVID vaccination options to address spread of variant
  • After caterer drops out, Ride the Rockies overruns Ridgway restaurants
  • Governor Polis signs transportation bill
  • Kate Redmond reports on next steps for Paonia Advisory Water Committee

Outdoors International

  • Ela Family Farms facing devastating fruit tree losses
  • Montrose City Council approves $16M for new police station
  • Ridgway School District declines Telluride Foundation's request to donate field for affordable housing
  • 75% of Colorado school staff now vaccinated
  • USFS accepting comments on pine beetle management, email nicole.hutt at usda.gov
  • Restaurants will likely be able to keep delivering alcohol after the pandemic
  • Andrew Taylor, Colorado Parks & Wildlife, talks about removing high fences to help deer and elk

Maeve Conran / KGNU

  • Mesa County Economic Development group hopes BLM headquarters stays in Grand Junction
  • X Games will proceed in Aspen with no spectators
  • Western Colorado Food & Farm Forum kicks off with virtual screening tonight
  • Governor Polis urges hospitals to use now the COVID vaccines reserved for second doses
  • KGNU's Maeve Conran reports one researcher shining a light on the impact of fossil fuel emissions on air quality has become a target of the industry

  

Marci Krivonen / Aspen Public Radio

  • Cedaredge trustees leaning toward cap of 2 recreational, 1 medical marijuana retailers
  • Delta County Health Department not ready to vaccinate individuals younger than 70
  • Colorado's largest union of educators calling on lawmakers to increase funding, make classrooms safer
  • KSJD's Austin Cope: As Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association shifts focus to more renewable energy, undoing years of fossil fuel influence won't be easy

  

Lone Cone Library

  • Grand Junction City Council working on marijuana ballot measures for April election
  • CDOT will spend some of $150M relief funds to improve Hwy 50 between Delta & Grand Junction
  • Teachers not expected to start receiving vaccines until March, state providing rapid testing kits
  • Governor says residents age 70+ will soon have easier time scheduling COVID vaccinations
  • KOTO's Matt Hoisch explores what it means for local governments and public services when oil and gas revenues become more uncertain

  

Colorado Avalanche Information Center

  • Mesa, Delta, Montrose, San Miguel Counties will begin vaccinating frontline health workers next week
  • Connect for Health Colorado extends insurance sign-up deadline to Friday
  • Audit finds red flags at Colorado State Judiciary Administration
  • KBUT: Avalanche forecasters concerned about stability of this season's snowpack
  • Avalanche education courses see record enrollment numbers
  • Jodi Peterson gets oil & gas industry reaction to new COGCC rules

  

  • State lawmakers taking first look at possible budget cuts due to pandemic
  • Normal vaccinations for children slowly restart after pandemic postponement
  • DACA recipients on Western Slope await key ruling from Supreme Court

NEWS UPDATES

  • COVID-19 health insurance deadline 4/30
  •  Country Jam cancelled
  • Town of Paonia seeks input on master plan
  • Montrose library making home deliveries

Imagine that you're a judge, and you're asked to decide the case brought by Mary and Dave Wildman.

Back in 1997, Mary took the couple's 1-year-old son, Nicholas, to the doctor for the combination vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella. Right after the MMR shot, Mary says, Nicholas started crying uncontrollably.

"This was unbelievable screaming," she says.

Mary and her mom started driving Nicholas back to their home in Evans City, Pa.

California has been dealing with a big measles outbreak since December, when cases emerged among visitors to Disneyland in Orange County.

Measles spread quickly afterward. As of Friday, the state had confirmed 133 measles cases among residents since December.

Of the people who got sick and for whom the state could determine vaccination status, 57 people hadn't been vaccinated against measles and 20 people had had at least one shot of the vaccine.

With the recent outbreak of measles originating from Disneyland, there's been no shortage of speculation, accusation and recrimination concerning why some people won't vaccinate their children.

Vaccination Rates Worry Colorado Health Officials

Feb 6, 2015
flu shot, vaccine
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Europe District

The national measles outbreak has state and local health officials concerned. 

Last month 102 people from 14 states were reported to have measles, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One of those cases was reported in Colorado and a majority of them are part of an outbreak linked to a California amusement park.  

That’s why state and local health officials are urging adults to get vaccinated and parents to inoculate their kids against the disease.

Most of the 92 cases of measles confirmed in California are among adults — more than 62 percent. Maybe they or their parents chose not to vaccinate, or maybe those people are allergic to one of the ingredients in the measles vaccine.

But it's also possible that a few of those adults happened to slip through the cracks when the measles vaccine first came to the public.

In 1962, children's book author Roald Dahl lost his oldest daughter, Olivia, to measles. She was 7 years old.

Twenty-six years later, Dahl wrote a letter to parents about what happened:

The measles outbreak that started at Disneyland and one other California theme park is expanding, with 59 confirmed cases in patients ranging in age from 7 months to 70 years. The California Department of Public Health has linked 42 of these cases to people who visited Disneyland or Disney's California Adventure Park.

Initially, cases were linked to people who visited the parks in mid-December, but health officials now say that other people with measles were at the parks in January while infectious and also have spread the disease.

There's been a lot of attention drawn to people who don't believe in vaccinating their children, but there are many more people who believe that vaccines are the best way to protect children from contagious disease. A recent poll shows just how concerned parents are about vaccines when it comes to putting their children in day care.

Brace yourselves: Flu season is coming. And along with the coughing, fevers and aches, you can expect a lot of unreliable or downright wrong information about the flu vaccine.

Many people underestimate the health risks from flu. Thousands of Americans die from flu-related complications in a typical year, and last season's H1N1 strain hit young adults particularly hard.

When essayist Eula Biss was pregnant with her son, she decided she wanted to do just a bit of research into vaccination. "I thought I would do a small amount of research to answer some questions that had come up for me," she tells NPR's Audie Cornish. "And the questions just got bigger the more I learned and the more I read."

Bill Aimed At Boosting Vaccine Rates Becomes Law

May 21, 2014
Vaccination, SB 1288, Vaccine exemption, Colorado
U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

A bill seeking to boost vaccination rates was signed into law by Governor John Hickenlooper on Wednesday.   

House Bill 1288 requires schools to standardize how they track vaccine exemption rates and make that data available to parents if they ask for it.

KVNF Regional News: Thursday, February 27, 2014

Feb 27, 2014

Newscast

  • Governor John Hickenlooper weighs in on chicken farm debate in Delta County

  • State officials try to figure out what to do with marijuana tax money

  • Montrose is improving habitat for fish at its new whitewater park

  • Colorado lawmakers want to make it harder for parents to opt-out of vaccinating their kids

Headlines:

  • Nearly half of U.S. children don't get properly vaccinated
  • BLM visits Hotchkiss Town Council; will be in Crawford, Paonia tonight
  • Rep. Ray Scott wants oil and gas leasing taxes for higher education