Water

Grassroots TV / KDNK

  • Colorado COVID hospitalizations at highest point of 2021
  • Outbreaks in Colorado schools have risen for 8 weeks in a row with 3000 children testing positive so far
  • New study shows lotteries did not encourage vaccination
  • BLM's largest wild horse gather in history underway in Wyoming
  • Water experts testify on drought in Congress
  • Colorado legislators may raise property taxes on short-term rentals, let cyclists cruise through stop signs
  • VP of Garfield County Re-2 school board resigns in face of threats, intimidation

  

Delta County Living

  • 80 Colorado K-12 schools have active COVID outbreaks
  • Breakthrough COVID case numbers & hospitalizations of vaccinated people are rising
  • Montrose County labor force grew in Q2
  • Ouray initiating legal action against 7 illegal short-term rentals
  • Sand Wash Basin wild horse roundups ending early
  • Drawdowns emptying Blue Mesa Reservoir
  • Roaring Fork School District alumni launch comprehensive sex ed for teens
  • Orchard City trustees vote to unseat member of planning commission 

U.S. Census Bureau

  • Interior Department restarts oil & gas leasing on public lands while fighting lawsuit by industry
  • Colorado proposes new transportation planning standards to reduce pollution
  • Delta, Montrose among 16 recipients of CDOT funds to revitalize Main Streets
  • Palisade faces criticism over regulation of retail pot shops
  • Ruedi Reservoir so low Aspen could struggle to generate hydro power
  • Water shortage declared for lower Colorado River Basin
  • Kate Redmond reports on release of 2020 Census numbers

  

Tamara Chuang / Colorado Sun

  • New Colorado law lets universities award associates degrees to students who accrued 70 college credits
  • Bureau of Reclamation drawing down Blue Mesa Reservoir to help shore up Lake Powell
  • Colorado Sun reporter Tamara Chuang asked readers what constitutes a living wage, and discusses their responses with KGNU's Shannon Young

  

Jay Canode

  • Hotchkiss plans a water work session in August, last comprehensive assessment was in 1999
  • UPDATE: CDOT closures on US 550 DELAYED between Ouray and Engineer Pass
  • Senator Michael Bennet touts the expanded child tax credit program, reviews eligibility
  • Skate park advocate Jay Canode discusses what's next, as Paonia Board of Trustees declined to green light a skate park project at Paonia Town Park or along the river at their meeting last week

  

KOAA NEWS5

In a drying landscape one thing we can do to halt desertification is to restore small water cycles. What does that mean? It means keeping the water that does fall or comes down through irrigation and streams in local circulation. There are many ways to do this through the way we graze animals, to keeping our ditch water above ground, planting and caring for trees, and restoring soil health. The simple global principal at work here is that in the biosphere, water follows carbon. Where there is more carbon there will be more water.

Centennial Middle School

  • Montrose Indians, Centennial Braves to change mascots by end of next school year
  • COVID made it more difficult to count low-income kids
  • Federal Court rules filming of police in public is protected by 1st amendment
  • Mesa County Public Health expanding COVID vaccination options to address spread of variant
  • After caterer drops out, Ride the Rockies overruns Ridgway restaurants
  • Governor Polis signs transportation bill
  • Kate Redmond reports on next steps for Paonia Advisory Water Committee

Andre Moura / Pexels

  • Telluride Foundation proposes 60 deed-restricted affordable housing units in Ouray
  • Carson Lake drained for repairs
  • Frontier Airlines begins Grand Junction flights
  • Second Chance Center expands from Aurora to Denver, to address recidivism 
  • Apollo Rodriquez speaks to Delta County Emergency Manager Kris Stewart about 9-digit dialing
  • Kate Redmond filed an open records request to obtain the long-awaited hydrology report for the town of Paonia's water system, but the report comes with some surprises

  

Courtesy of Delta County School District

  • Town of Paonia approves new pot shop ordinance
  • Colorado Sun & National Trust for Local News purchase chain of 24 Front Range newspapers
  • Luke Runyon reports on preparations for first-ever water shortage declaration along Colorado River
  • Kate Redmond speaks to Arlene Porteus, among critics of North Fork school consolidation, as well as asking Delta County School District superintendent Caryn Gibson for reaction to some complaints

  

Roy Buri / Pixabay

  • USDA, EPA, FDA launch Restore Colorado to reduce food waste
  • Ela Family Farms starts 'adopt a tree' program, supporters get sapling named after them
  • USBR releases Aspinall Water to assist with low Gunnison River flows 
  • Green jobs rebounding after pandemic plunge
  • Luke Runyon reports on water speculation
  • New research says wildfire smoke may have caused bird die-off last year
  • Delta BOCC awards recycling contract to Double J
  • Colorado officials welcome return of federal work on mitigating climate change impacts

  

Stasia Lanier / KSUT

  • Uncompahgre Valley Water Users Association turns on water for canals
  • Though Governor relaxed statewide mask mandate for counties in level green, masks are still required in schools & health care facilities, plus all public places in 33 counties at level blue, yellow, and orange
  • Lawmakers debate state budget this week
  • Laura Palmisano reports road accessing Lake San Cristobal finally gets repairs
  • KSUT's Sarah Flower asks Fort Lewis College president Tom Stritikus about becoming first in Colorado requiring COVID vaccination for Fall semester

Kate Groetzinger / KUER

  • Tax Day pushed back to May 17
  • Grand Junction City Council candidates release campaign finance reports
  • Ridgway cancels April election
  • Montrose City Council approves La Raza Park improvements
  • 42nd annual Crawford Pioneer Days back in the saddle in June
  • Polis signs bills to help prepare for wildfire season
  • Moab has less water in aquifer than previously thought

  

Kate Redmond

  • Planet Bluegrass announces plans for this year's Telluride Bluegrass Festival
  • Delta County Sheriff's Department eyes takeover of historic Delta Library building
  • Colorado lawmakers approve bill to spend tens of millions more on wildfire preparedness
  • Water scarcity in the Colorado River Basin causes some states to rethink water law
  • Law scholars argue for Indigenous knowledge to be admissible as court testimony
  • KVNF's Kate Redmond speaks to Mayor Mary Bachran about tree removal in Paonia

  

Luke Runyon / KUNC

  • Delta County moves to blue on the state's COVID dial
  • BLM will relocate at least 500 wild horses from Piceance Basin herd
  • Kate Redmond reports on marijuana ordinance updates from Tuesday's Paonia trustee meeting 
  • KUNC's Luke Runyon reports Greeley's multi-million dollar water project is not without opposition

Kaspar Keil

  • Hotchkiss accepts Baker Ranches bid for Fire Mountain Canal shares, puts Overland Ditch shares out for new bids
  • Paonia in Motion virtual input gathering events scheduled for Monday - Wednesday next week
  • Grand Junction City Council marijuana task force solidifies recommendations on land use codes
  • KVNF's Kate Redmond gets an update from Paradise Theater manager Sunshine Knight
  • Laura Palmisano hears about changes to the COVID dial from CDPHE official Mara Brosy-Wiwchar 

  

Gavin Dahl

The Town of Paonia mailed notices to residents last week about lead exceeding permitted levels at a handful of specific sample sites. The results of the tests do not reflect a system-wide contamination problem. Paonia's water system serves about 1600 water lines connecting nearly 3000 people total. Since the letters went out, town officials have been responding to a lot of confusion from residents. KVNF spoke to town administrator Corinne Ferguson to learn more. 

Scott Franz

  • Colorado teachers now have rapid COVID self-tests from the state
  • CDC says ventilation indoors can cut down spread of COVID, but what makes for good ventilation?
  • Capitol Coverage: Colorado lawmakers considering $1B stimulus proposal in response to pandemic
  • Paonia town administrator Corinne Ferguson discusses notices sent to residents last week about lead exceeding permitted levels at six specific testing sites, and outlines next steps

Luke Runyon / KUNC

  • Colorado Health Institute reports more than half of Colorado prisoners have contracted COVID-19
  • Asymptomatic COVID testing suspended in Ouray County
  • Northside Elementary transitions to online learning, Olathe Middle High School closed by asbestos
  • Changing the Narrative director Janine Vanderburg explains anti-ageism campaign featuring greeting cards designed by locals like Cara Helmick of Orchard City & Lu Anne Tyrell of Montrose
  • KUNC's Luke Runyon explains current drought conditions in the Colora

Luke Runyon / KUNC

  • Governor Polis signs 5 bills 
  • President Biden beings process to restore Bears Ears, Grand Staircase-Escalante boundaries
  • Retail marijuana will be on April ballot in Grand Junction
  • Ridgway switching water filtration from chlorine dioxide to carbon
  • Drought plan activated for upper Colorado River
  • Delta County Health director shares COVID-19 update
  • Ian Silverii of Progress Now says Western Slope residents should share comments on redistricting

Roberta McGowan / The Sopris Sun

  • Colorado sending National Guard troops to inauguration
  • Governor launches Greenhouse Gas Pollution Reduction roadmap
  • Congresswoman Lauren Boebert's communications director resigns
  • Senator John Hickenlooper announces 7 regional offices, including Grand Junction, Durango
  • Colorado lawmakers adjourned for at least a month after 3-day 'soft opening'
  • KBUT's Christopher Biddle reports on the fight for clean drinking water in Somerset

  

Rain & Shine: Sky Crystals

Jan 7, 2021
Calla Rose Ostrander

Water is life. It makes up 71% of Earth’s body and 60% of ours. An essential element it is often characterized by being in motion: flowing, ebbing, falling, freezing, melting, vaporizing, condensensing. Water is ever cycling through its different states of being, as a gas (vapor), a liquid (water), and a solid (ice).

Judy Fahys / InsideClimateNews

  • State revokes Ex-Delta Police officer Jeremy Gay's certification for lying 
  • Town of Paonia clears up CDPHE water supply violations
  • Colorado bars, restaurants can keep some sales taxes collected
  • Labor unions receive more than 1000 workplace safety complaints during COVID pandemic
  • Reporter Judy Fahys discovers Great Basin cave offers global warming cautionary tale

  

  • CMU suspends sports, asks students to quarantine for rest of semester
  • Paradise Theatre will go dark for the winter
  • Somerset still struggling to provide clean drinking water
  • Utah declares state of emergency
  • Governor Polis hopeful Colorado can get 200,000 doses of COVID vaccine by Jan 1
  • Jodi Peterson speaks with Montrose Memorial Hospital doctor Drew Bolton

  

Luke Runyon

  • U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree selected from Ouray Ranger District
  • Norwood Parks & Rec will get CPW trails grant
  • Confirmed COVID case numbers continue to rise
  • KBUT: Crested Butte Town Trustees vote to paint Black Lives Matter on street downtown
  • Luke Runyon: Reservoirs proposed in Northern Colorado spark debate about lack of water

  

  • Congressional candidates Diane Mitsch Bush, Lauren Boebert agree on protecting Western Slope water
  • Delta County reports second COVID-19 death
  • Town of Cedaredge trustees remove planning commission vice chair James Ayers
  • Fort Mojave Indian Tribe seeks a new national monument in Nevada
  • Renzo DelPiccolo speaks to KVNF on his last day after 33 years at Colorado Parks & Wildlife

Judy Fahys

  • Smoke from area fires, including the Pine Gulch Fire in Mesa County, is impacting our area
  • A second person has died from COVID-19 in Mesa County
  • Western Slope fruit growers are feeling impacts from the April freeze
  • Democrats need four seats to take the U.S. Senate
  • Colorado voters may only get to see one U.S. Senate debate this year
  • Judy Fahys reports for InsideClimateNews about humpback chubs in the Grand Canyon

Gavin Dahl

On Tuesday, Colorado U.S. Senator Michael Bennet introduced new legislation he’s calling The RESILIENT Act that is designed to dramatically improve how rural communities can secure federal infrastructure funding to develop new projects. 

 

For Sen. Bennet, this is a signature piece of legislation. 

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

This week, host Jill Spears and gardeners Lulu Volckhausen and Lance Swigart are joined by special guest Wind Clearwater of Clearwater Design.

Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears and gardening gurus Lance Swigart and Lulu Volckhausen discuss midsummer gardening tips and take calls from listeners.

Jill, Lance & Lulu discuss the best ways to beat the heat in the garden! "Lots of water" is the answer for many issues with our current dry spell.

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