Water Shortages

  • New report indicates Colorado River to be at unprecedented low flow by next year
  • Lower Basin states expected to have water cutbacks by September 2019
  • Congress debates critical Farm Bill, set to expire next month, has little agreement
  • San Luis Valley program helps poor in state get healthy food at reduced cost

  • Final installment of water conservation series
  • Denver follows others in recycling sewage, people wary of drinking it
  • Climate change in state can be altered by diet choices

  • Water sharing techniques in Southwest based on ancient tradition
  • Future generations of farmers leaving Southwest, old ways being forgotten
  • May is Healthy Vision Month, many Colorado adults don't get eye exams
  • Recap of results from high school sports state tournaments

Headlines

  • Heather Jensen Will Stand Trial in Grand Junction
  • Water Conflicts Escalating between Agriculture and Growing Colorado Cities
  • Aspen Medical Marijuana Dispensary Gears Up for Retail Sales
  • Colorado Oil and Gas Association Donates Over $604,000 to Pro-Fracking Campaigns
  • KVNF Sports Report

Travis Bubenik/KVNF

For this week's iSeeChange report, we looked into the recent flurry of rain and some snow, and what, if anything, it might tell us about the coming winter.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

The future of agriculture across the Great Plains hinges on water. Without it, nothing can grow.

Climate models and population growth paint a pretty bleak picture for water availability a few decades from now. If farmers want to stay in business, they have to figure out how to do more with less. Enter: super efficient irrigation systems.

Maeve Conran

All around Colorado new collaborations are emerging around water storage and water use.  Partnerships with reservoirs are turning out to be key in terms of environmental stewardship, river protection, and healthy communities that rely on water.  As part of the year long series Connecting the Drops, KGNUs Maeve Conran looks at some of these collaborations that have produced tangible results.

Eli Nixon (CC BY-NC-SA)

Afternoon clouds and occasional rains have dotted the Western Slope in the past few weeks, but that doesn’t mean people aren’t still worried about their water.

Last week Matthew Harris posted on the Almanac that the water he gets from German Creek was called on by a senior rights holder for the first time in the eight years he’s lived in Paonia. His creek’s just one of many that snake across the North Fork Valley, but if it’s been that long since that senior rights holder felt like they needed more water, should other residents and farmers be concerned?