wildlife

MELVIN WOODY / US FOREST SERVICE

  • Grand Junction Sentinel finds contradictions in congressional candidate Boebert's claims
  • Theft and vandalism of campaign signs rampant in Ouray County
  • New trails complete at Crossroads Park in Hotchkiss 
  • Governor allows high school football this fall
  • Disability community want to make sure all eligible voters can cast

Gavin Dahl

As area wildlife manager for Montrose since 2006, Renzo DelPiccolo’s responsibilities at Colorado Parks and Wildlife included law enforcement for hunting, tracking poachers, managing wildlife conflicts with bears and elk, public education, and advising land use planners on wildlife impacts. Over the course of a 33-year career at CPW, Renzo considers his work helping create new wildlife areas for permanent protection and reintroducing moose to the Grand Mesa among his biggest accomplishments. We spoke on his last day before retirement.

  • Congressional candidates Diane Mitsch Bush, Lauren Boebert agree on protecting Western Slope water
  • Delta County reports second COVID-19 death
  • Town of Cedaredge trustees remove planning commission vice chair James Ayers
  • Fort Mojave Indian Tribe seeks a new national monument in Nevada
  • Renzo DelPiccolo speaks to KVNF on his last day after 33 years at Colorado Parks & Wildlife

  • Capitol Coverage of new laws that took effect Jan. 1st
  • Colorado Parks and Wildlife effort to reinstate rainbow trout
  • All state parks will have a new registration system starting Jan. 1st
  • 2 wildlife areas near Montrose closed for the season to protect game animals
  • Flu season off to slow start in Mesa County, sees spike over Holidays

  • Governor Jared Polis dedicates Memorial Monument on Hwy 145
  • 33,000 Coloradans could lose food assistance under new Federal rule
  • Famous Chapel at Air Force Academy now closed for repairs
  • Governor Polis moves to protect wildlife corridors
  • Former Governor Hickenlooper will run for Senator Cory Gardner's seat

  • Legislative session ends Friday, many bills still remain
  • Voters will decide on massive cigarette, nicotine tax increase
  • Paid family leave bill fails, will be studied for next year
  • Gray wolf to be taken off ESA protections without public comment
  • Most state voters approve wildlife migration route protections

  • Local bowhunter pleads to wildlife violations
  • Amendment X causes apprehension among local hemp farmers
  • Republicans statewide lead in returned ballots so far, one week to go
  • Former Paonia athlete makes history for CMU women's wrestling

  • Colorado volunteers work to restore wildlife corridor
  • Bikes for public use available at Sweitzer Lake outside Delta
  • Parks and Wildlife warns about protecting hay from deer, elk
  • Fishing line left at rivers and lakes a danger to wildlife
  • State Parks offer best viewing locales for eclipse

  • Divisions in GOP apparent in failure to pass transportation bill
  • Dept of Transportation warns of wildlife on state roads
  • Executive Order calls for review of national monuments
  • Parks and Wildlife opens two reservoirs to public on May 1st
  • Bill to help rural counties pay for health care fails at state house
  • City of Montrose announces two work programs

A Colorado woman managed to fight off a mountain lion that was attacking her 5-year-old son.

During the harrowing rescue Friday evening, she "reached into the animal's mouth and wrested her son's head from its jaws," The Aspen Times reported.

Black-footed ferrets have "a lot of hair, big bad teeth and a bad-boy attitude," says Kimberly Fraser. She and other federal wildlife officials are re-introducing the rare creatures to the prairie in a suburb of Denver.

"They're a native species. They belong here," says Fraser, an outreach specialist with a program to re-introduce the ferrets in 12 states from Montana to Texas.

black bear
U.S. Forest Service

State wildlife officials have concluded that a bear didn’t attack and maul a hunter over the weekend on the Grand Mesa. 

On Saturday, a man in his late 60s reported he was attacked by a bear. He told Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials he was parked on his ATV near Powderhorn Ski Resort when a bear attacked him causing him to drive over a small cliff into rocks below. CPW says the episode left him  with extensive but non-life threatening injuries.  

iSeeChange: Dangerous Crossings

Sep 22, 2015
Colorado Department of Transportation

The trees are starting to turn and the mornings are getting colder.  Fall is here, and that means increased animal activity. 

Colorado's South Platte River basin is a powerhouse for crops and cattle. Massive reservoirs quench the region's thirst, with farm fields generally first in line. Wildlife? It's often last.

A small win-win though is giving waterfowl a little more room at the watering hole. It's a program that creates warm winter ponds for migrating ducks — then gives the water back, in time for summer crops.

KVNF Regional News: Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015

Sep 22, 2015

  • Lawsuit looks to stop expansion at Bowie #2 coal mine
  • Economy good, but slowing down
  • CDOT tries to tackle animal collisions
  • Judge rules cuts to school funding constitutional

Rare Sight: Moose In Grand Junction

Sep 21, 2015
bull moose
Colorado Parks and Wildlife

The Grand Valley had an unusual visitor last week. Colorado Parks and Wildlife received calls about a moose in Grand Junction near Orchard Mesa. 

"As curious as that may sound it turned out to be true," said JT Romatzke, the area wildlife manager. "We did respond and did indeed find a young bull moose in the Grand Valley."

KVNF Regional Newscast: Friday, Sept. 4, 2015

Sep 4, 2015

  • Delta County sees spike in whooping cough cases
  • Three running for Delta County School Board
  • Grand Junction hires Glenwood Springs firm to create strategic broadband plan
  • iSeeChange: Coyotes on the Western Slope
  • Colorado State Fair opens with strong attendance

Event Celebrates Grand Mesa’s Moose Population

Jul 24, 2015
bull moose
Kent Miller / NPS

The moose population on the Grand Mesa is growing. The area is home to more than 400 of the large animals. This Saturday, July 25 is the sixth annual Grand Mesa Moose Day event. 

Feds Announce New Plans For Sage Grouse Protection

May 28, 2015

The Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service has announced a new plan to protect the greater sage grouse from extinction, while hoping to prevent the bird from being added to the endangered species list.

The sage grouse population has dropped from 16 million birds to less than half a million, mainly due to lost sagebrush habitat. The bird's range spans 11 western states including Colorado.

"As land managers of two-thirds of greater sage grouse habitat, we have a responsibility to take action that ensures a bright future for wildlife and a thriving western economy," said Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell at the announcement in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Fans of Boulder County's osprey nest cam saw a bit of drama last season.

Two females and a male were living in the nest, when a third female arrived and kicked the original female out. Observers said she bonded with the male.

"People called it ... the 'home-wrecker osprey,' " says Nik Brockman, Boulder County's web specialist.

A badly abused Peruvian bear named Cholita is coming to a sanctuary in Colorado. Animal Defenders International announced that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service expedited the request and she will be on her way next month.

In Peru, a beleaguered bear is looking for a new home.

And the former circus animal is getting high-profile help from Michael Bond, the British author of the well-loved children's books about Paddington bear.

The tale of Cholita, an Andean spectacled bear like the fictional Paddington, is less the stuff of children's books and more of horror films.

If you want a sobering look at the scale of wildlife trafficking, just visit the National Wildlife Property Repository on the outskirts of Denver. In the middle of a national refuge is a cavernous warehouse stuffed with the remains of 1.5 million animals, whole and in parts.

They range from taxidermied polar bears to tiny sea horses turned into key chains. An area devoted to elephants is framed by a pair of enormous tusks.

Flickr user tuchodi.

Mule deer populations are declining around the West, and Western Colorado is no exception. Now, Colorado Parks and Wildlife is hoping to bring a diverse group of people together to brainstorm what to do about it. Randy Hampton is a spokesman for the agency. KVNF's Emily Guerin asked him to explain what's going on with mule deer.

Headlines

  • Use of Drones for Hunting May Soon Be Illegal in Colorado
  • North Fork Coalition Presents Limited Drilling Plan to County Commissioners
  • FBI Fraud Investigation Could Threaten Grants for GJ Airport
  • Delta Municipal Power Plant Set to Close
  • Case Against Montrose City Councilor Moved to Mesa County
  • Job Growth Likely for Colorado in the Near-Term
  • CP&W Seeking Nominations for Landowner of the Year Award

Randy Hampton/Colorado Parks & Wildlife

Recently on the Almanac, Peter Cullen noticed he hasn't seen many bears in the mountains of New Mexico this year.

Bears are foragers, and Cullen says the lack of piñon, oak and juniper trees caused them to head down to mountain towns looking for thrown-away leftovers.

That got us thinking about our bear populations here in western Colorado.

Headlines

  • 5,250 Gallons of Oil Spill into South Platte River
  • Norwood Bans Commercial Marijuana
  • Town of Telluride & Telluride Science Research Center Reach Agreement on New Facility
  • Bicyclist Hit and Killed at HWY 50 and Lands End Road South of Grand Junction
  • Energy Companies Concerned about New Wildlife Habitat Regulations

Anda Rojs Smalls

Unlike other Western states, Colorado’s moose population is growing. It’s healthier than ever with an estimated 2300 moose across the state. While other states are grappling with why their herds are shrinking, Colorado is studying the population’s fast growth. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Anda Rojs Smalls has lived in the Aspen area for over a decade. But, it was just recently that she saw a moose.

"My first moose sighting was about two years ago, in the summertime, with my kids up at the Maroon Lake," she says.

KVNF Local Newscast: Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Jun 18, 2013

Headlines:

  • Montrose wins All America City Award
  • Former Paonia Town Employee Chesnik to be sentenced June 24
  • Man fined for harming collared lizard at Colorado National Monument
  • Delta County imposes stage one fire restrictions
  • Wildfire Update
  • Wildfire reduction grants available
  • Colorado Air Quality Commission to hold public forum in Grand Junction on Thursday

KVNF Local Newscast: Thursday, June 13, 2013.

Jun 13, 2013

Headlines:

  • Female bear tracked and killed up Terror Creek after killing chickens
  • Mesa County approves natural gas processing plant west of DeBeque
  • Regna Jones leases Paonia’s Paradise Theatre for another six months
  • Colorado Wildfire Update
  • DMEA looks to broadband

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