Short Features

Short audio features played throughout the KVNF program schedule:

Western Slope Skies: Black Canyon Astronomical Society

Western Slope Skies is produced by members of the Black Canyon Astronomical Society, who take a look at our local night sky. Hear it every other Friday morning after the  local newscast (from 8-8:10 AM) and on the following Wednesday night at 7 PM just before Global Express.

Mindful Moments: Sundays at 11:00 am

A weekly opportunity for you to pause, find stillness, and look inward leading to a better understanding of self and of the world around you. Your host, Erin Easton will offer teachings to help you find more kindness, peace, and ease in your daily life.

Pulse of the Planet: Weekdays at 1:00 pm

Each weekday, the Pulse of the Planet radio series provides its listeners with a two-minute sound portrait of Planet Earth, tracking the rhythms of nature, culture and science worldwide, blending interviews with extraordinary natural sound.

Hightower Radio Lowdown: Tuesday & Thursday at 7:00 pm

2-minute commentaries by Jim Hightower, America’s most popular populist. He is a best-selling author, public speaker, and political sparkplug who learned from his daddy, W. F. Hightower, that “Everybody does better when everybody does better.” Twice elected Texas Agriculture Commissioner (which put him square in the crosshairs of corporate agribusiness,) he has long chronicled the ongoing democratic struggles by America’s ordinary people against rule by its plutocratic elites. You can read more about Jim at JimHightower.com.

BirdNote: Weekdays at 5:49 am and Tue-Fri at 3:57 pm

Birds connect us with the joy and wonder of nature. By telling vivid, sound-rich stories about birds and the challenges they face, BirdNote inspires listeners to care about the natural world — and take steps to protect it.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

This is the final "short" version of 'As the Worm Turns,' as aired Monday, June 2nd, during Free Range Radio. Beginning Tuesday, June 10th, the feature expands to a full half-hour, live call-in format, airing every Tuesday at 6:30 pm. Be sure to tune in, and call 527-4866 or 1-866-KVNF-NOW with your gardening questions!

Light Pollution

Those of us that live on the Western Slope are no stranger to spectacular scenery. The jagged peaks, chiseled canyons, and expansive plateaus of western Colorado are treasures that we all cherish. But one of our most spectacular natural wonders may also be one of our least appreciated: our incredibly dark and pristine night skies.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Free Range Radio host Donna Littlefield talks with gardener extraordinaire Lance Swigart.

Suze Smith

KVNF's "Guru of Gardening," Lance Swigart, keeps us informed about spring chores. He chats here with host Jill Spears

Mercury in Evening Twilight
 

Have you ever seen the planet Mercury? When conditions are near optimal, Mercury is easy to see. However, optimal conditions are rare, and many casual observers search for Mercury without success. This is because of the planet’s proximity to the sun.  The safe time to view Mercury is after sunset or before sunrise, depending upon the Mercury's orbit.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

KVNF host Cyn Holder chats with gardener Lance Swigart, who, like many in Western Colorado, is busy protecting his garden from the recent late spring snowfall & chilly temperatures.

Saturn at Opposition

Last month on the program we learned that only the five superior planets can be at opposition. The fast movement of our planet’s orbit brings us between those five planets and the sun every year. In April, Mars was at opposition. This month, on Saturday, May 10th, its Saturn’s turn to shine!

Suze Smith

The Tarps go on, the tarps come off... gardener Lance Swigart has been dealing with spring frost. He visits with KVNF host Jill Spears.

Navigating the Night Sky

The Big Dipper is a great starting point for learning the night sky. Located near the pole of the sky, it never completely sets or dips below the horizon—it’s visible in the night sky year-round from the Western Slope! 

The Big Dipper itself is not a constellation, but it resides in one called Ursa Major, the Great Bear, third largest of the 88 constellations. The name originates from the dipper-shaped pattern formed by the seven main stars in the constellation.

Suze Smith

As the Worm Turns, Monday, 2/17/14

Host Patrick Webb  is joined by gardener Lance Swigart & his special guest, Aaron Heideman, for more conversation about permaculture.

photo of Lance
Suze Smith

Monday, Feb. 10th, 2014

Guest host Steve Hoffman is joined by gardener Lance Swigart & his special guest, Aaron Heideman, for a conversation about permaculture.

Suze Smith

Biodynamic Composting

Free Range Radio host Patrick Webb chats with gardeners Lance Swigert & Pat Frazier.

Aired Thursday, July 18 & Sunday, July 21, 2013.

Image: "Soul Sailing" by Missy Rogers
Missy Rogers

Aired Sunday, July 14th, 2013

What is the motor and fuel for three types of power: power over, power with, and imminence?

Confessions of a Heavy Thinker: Go Forth and Lose

Jul 11, 2013
<A HREF="http://www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/">Okinawa Soba</a>

Lessons learned (or not) from an ancient game.

Dennis McKenna

The McKenna Brothers are two of Paonia's illustrious, possibly infamous, hometown icons. Younger brother Dennis is an ethnobotanist. His older brother Terence, who died in 2000, was known for his books on psychedelics and the nature of consciousness, with such titles as "True Hallucinations and The Archaic Revival: Speculations on Psychedelic Mushrooms, the Amazon, Virtual Reality, UFOs, Evolution, Shamanism, the Rebirth of the Goddess and the End of History."

Travis Bubenik, KVNF

For this week’s iSeeChange report, we explore concerns about ditch lining in the area, and whether these manmade environmental changes (much like the ditches themselves) may alter their surroundings.

Last week on the Almanac, Stewart Mesa resident noticed fewer numbers of wasps around her house. She says usually by this time of the summer, her front porch is practically overrun with wasps. But this year they seem to have disappeared. 

Image: "Soul Sailing" by Missy Rogers
Missy Rogers

Aired Sunday, June 30th, 2013

What do I want to be famous (or infamous) for?

Image: "Soul Sailing" by Missy Rogers
Missy Rogers

Summer peak in an alpine wilderness.

This is the first in a series of Western Slope Skies episodes about Women in Astronomy.  We hope that, in some manner, these inspire our young female listeners to become involved in astronomy.

On June 16, 1963, the Russians launched Vostok 6.  The lone astronaut on board was Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space.  She was in space for 48 orbits over three days.  In her single mission, she logged more time in space than all the American astronauts who had been in space to that date combined.

Western Slope Skies 6/7/2013

Jun 7, 2013

Have you ever attended a night sky session and heard people talk about Messier 13 or Messier 6?  Today we discuss the man whose list is a legacy that still excites astronomers over 200 years later. 

Charles Messier was born in France on June 26, 1730.  He became interested in astronomy at a young age.  In 1751, the French Navy hired Messier as an assistant astronomer in Paris. 

Image: "Soul Sailing" by Missy Rogers
Missy Rogers

Aired Sunday, June 2nd, 2013

John, with his Cockney accent and rough humor, is a camouflaged, guerilla healer.

Image: "Soul Sailing" by Missy Rogers
Missy Rogers

Aired Sunday, May 26, 2013  (Repeat)

A song for Memorial Day.

Confessions of a Heavy Thinker: Pray

May 24, 2013

This week, just after sunset, we can see an amazing grouping of  planets in the western sky.  From May 24 until May 29, Venus, Jupiter, and Mercury will fit within a 5 degree circle – less than half the width of your fist held at arm’s length!   On May 26 these planets will be within 2 and one half degrees of each other – only half the apparent distance between the pointer stars of the Big Dipper!    

Image: "Soul Sailing" by Missy Rogers
Missy Rogers

Our physical inheritance offers clues about our ancestors

“Hey, can you see the flag in that thing?!”  It’s a question that makes us wince when observing the moon at astronomy outreaches.  The answer is…Maybe if you were aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter… but, all six of the flags are now faded to white, and the first one blew over when the Apollo 11 lunar module blasted off departing the moon.  

From our backyards, the moon, our closest celestial neighbor, is easily observed by the unaided eye  as it moves through its changing phases.  During the next two weeks, the moon will move from new to nearly full.

 

Confessions of a Heavy Thinker: Round the Bend

May 10, 2013

Confessions of a Heavy Thinker: The Genie

May 10, 2013

Confessions of a Heavy Thinker: Dolphins

May 10, 2013

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