FCC

Laura Palmisano

  • Colorado now offering rapid, at-home COVID tests directly to residents
  • Advantage Treatment Center at community corrections complex in Montrose is a COVID outbreak site
  • About 1 in 99 people in Colorado is contagious with COVID, the highest rate this year
  • Colorado Congressmembers urge FCC to add text option to national suicide prevention hotline
  • State economists boost revenue expectations
  • Census Bureau identifies risk factors in the way of community resilience during disasters
  • Scientists identify Colorado rivers, streams to protect

Conservatives for Responsible Stewardship

  • Delta County Memorial Hospital & 13 clinics rebranding as Delta Health
  • Animas River records record low flow, again
  • Elijah McClain: Investigation criticizes Aurora police & 'failed' internal investigation
  • Lauren Boebert amends FEC filing on mileage reimbursements
  • Critics: FCC awarded SpaceX nearly $900m for untested rural broadband project
  • Luke Runyon: Rivers in the southwest impacted by climate change
  • Kate Redmond interviews Conservatives for Responsible Stewardship president David Jenkins

The Federal Communications Commission approved the policy known as net neutrality by a 3-2 vote at its Thursday meeting, with FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler saying the policy will ensure "that no one — whether government or corporate — should control free open access to the Internet."

The Open Internet Order helps to decide an essential question about how the Internet works, requiring service providers to be a neutral gateway instead of handling different types of Internet traffic in different ways — and at different costs.

"Today is a red-letter day," Wheeler said Thursday.

Updated at 4:48 p.m. ET

President Obama is expected to lay out plans today intended to make it easier for cities, towns and rural communities to offer their citizens fast and cheap broadband Internet.