Coronavirus News

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Most of the gargantuan sum of money in the coronavirus bill Congress just passed is dealing with the economic crisis, not the public health one.

"Most of the bill is on emergency relief to people and unemployment insurance," says Loren Adler, associate director of USC-Brookings Schaeffer Initiative for Health Policy. "The health care provisions are, in some sense, secondary."

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill contains a lot of help for a lot of industries, but what's in there for health care? NPR health policy reporter Selena Simmons-Duffin gives us the highlights.

SELENA SIMMONS-DUFFIN, BYLINE: Most of that gargantuan sum of money is dealing with the economic crisis here, not the public health one, going to things like emergency relief for various industries, unemployment insurance and the like. For health, the biggest-ticket item is $100 billion for hospitals and health care providers.

  • City of Montrose making efforts to help businesses hurt by coronavirus
  • Parks and Wildlife issues new closures after Stay at Home order
  • Local recreation projects selected for grant funding
  • Governor Polis signs over 60 bills into law over the course of last week

  NEWS UPDATES

  • Governor Jared Polis issues statewide stay-at-home executive order
  • Hinsdale County implementing more stringent protection measures
  • Montrose County up to 6 confirmed cases of COVID-19
  • Water managers taking steps to ensure water supply remains consistent
  • United States Senate passes historic 2 trillion dollar aid package

  NEWS UPDATES

To help curb the spread of COVID-19, Gov. Jared Polis has issued a statewide stay-at-home order that goes into effect Thursday morning at 6 a.m.

Coloradans will still be able to go outside to get groceries, take walks and care for loved ones. But Polis is ordering most of the state’s 5.7 million residents to stay at home at all other times.

The order does not apply to essential workers like doctors and first responders.

  • First case of COVID-19 confirmed in Delta County
  • 5 of 6 KVNF listening area counties now have at least one case of COVID-19
  • Study released about hospital preparation, readiness for oncoming patients
  • Number of communities around state under shelter in place growing

  NEWS UPDATES

  • National Guard tests for coronavirus in Montrose, 2nd case confirmed
  • Unemployment office overwhelmed by applications, system crashes
  • Attorney General says some trials should be postponed
  • Governor Jared Polis signs repeal of state death penalty, commutes 3 sentences
  • Signs of coronavirus ripple effect on Western Slope economy

  • National Guard conducts testing in Montrose
  • First confirmed case of COVID-19 reported in Montrose County
  • Hinsdale County reports first case of COVID-19, from Lake City
  • Governor Polis urges citizens to stay at home to prevent spread of coronavirus

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NPR NEWS Top Stories

While tens of millions of U.S. households continue to fill out 2020 census forms on their own, the coronavirus pandemic is forcing the Census Bureau to suspend field operations for the once-a-decade head count for two more weeks until April 15.

With coronavirus cases continuing to climb and hospitals facing the prospect of having to decide how to allocate limited staff and resources, the Department of Health and Human Services is reminding states and health care providers that civil rights laws still apply in a pandemic.

States are preparing for a situation when there's not enough care to go around by issuing "crisis of care" standards.

But disability groups are worried that those standards will allow rationing decisions that exclude the elderly or people with disabilities.

The World Health Organization says the virus that causes COVID-19 doesn't seem to linger in the air or be capable of spreading through the air over distances more than about three feet.

But at least one expert in virus transmission said it's way too soon to know that.

Countries all over the world are being impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. We hear how nations in the Middle East, Africa and Latin America are responding.

Hippos can get hungry. Very hungry. So when zoos shut their doors to the public because of the coronavirus, zookeepers keep showing up to work to make sure everyone is fed.

Jenna Wingate feeds Fiona, the Cincinnati Zoo's 3-year-old, 1,300-pound hippo. Fiona was born premature, and Wingate has been looking after her since two hours after she was born.

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