Author Interview with Cara Judea Alhadeff

On this week's Local Motion Kate Redmond interviews Paonia author Cara Judea Alhadeff about her book "Zazu Dreams: Between the Scarab and the Dung Beetle."

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Courtesy of Teya Cranson

  • CDC investigated elder care facilities in Mesa County, where unvaccinated staff are believed to be bringing COVID-19 to work
  • CPW held public input session on wolf reintroduction in Montrose
  • For 3rd time in 3 years, buying water from Ruedi Reservoir to offset low streamflow in Colorado River
  • School District 51 hires new director of equity & inclusion
  • Families in Colorado are already benefiting from advance child tax credit payments
  • Paradise Theatre to screen new doc Where We Belong by local filmmaker Teya Cranson

Western Slope Skies - Cosmic Dust

Jul 23, 2021
NASA

As a child, I was tasked with chores to help keep the house in order, none of which I dreaded more than dusting. It seemed a Sisyphean punishment - tenacious, sneeze-inducing; dust always returned no matter how hard I tried to eradicate it. But it was also mysterious - grey anonymous matter, seemingly sprung from nowhere. I would later learn that dust comprises minuscule bits of dirt, soot, pollen, fabric, dander…and heavenly bodies. That’s right - terrestrial dust is partly cosmic.

  • Flash floods in Poudre Canyon north of Ft. Collins claim the life of at least one person
  • I-70 through Glenwood Canyon shutdown briefly again
  • Grand Junction City Council discusses details of marijuana retail shops
  • Interior Department hold webinar on drought and resiliency infrastructure
  • 80 U.S. Reps urge funding for Civilian Climate Corps

Pexels-shvets production

  • CDPHE flies airborne survey at oil and gas sites on the Front Range
  • Interior Secretary Haaland visits Grand Junction on Friday
  • EPA includes new chemicals in latest draft of drinking water contaminants
  • Domestic violence survivors in Roaring Fork Valley get help

Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears and gardening gurus Lance Swigart and Lulu Volckhausen discuss hot topics for summer gardening and take your calls.

Email questions anytime to worm@kvnf.org, or call during the program at 1-866-KVNF-NOW.

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Courtesy of KDNK

  • Journalist & former Telluride resident Danny Fenster has contracted COVID in a Burmese prison
  • Delta variant of COVID showing up not only in Mesa County, but Delta County too
  • Olathe sweet corn harvest is underway, with 26 million ears headed to consumers in 30 states
  • KDNK's Amy Hadden Marsh speaks to state climatologist Dr. Russ Schumacker about La Niña weather

  

Jay Canode

  • Hotchkiss plans a water work session in August, last comprehensive assessment was in 1999
  • UPDATE: CDOT closures on US 550 DELAYED between Ouray and Engineer Pass
  • Senator Michael Bennet touts the expanded child tax credit program, reviews eligibility
  • Skate park advocate Jay Canode discusses what's next, as Paonia Board of Trustees declined to green light a skate park project at Paonia Town Park or along the river at their meeting last week

  

Sonia Gutierrez dreamed of returning to her hometown of Denver as a television reporter for the city's defining news station: KUSA 9News. When she finally achieved it, however, it came at too steep a cost, she says.

Gutierrez says she was told that she could report on immigration, an issue about which she cares deeply, but only if she were to state her own immigration status on air in every story on the subject.

"I was put in a box simply for who I am," Gutierrez says.

When President Biden gave a much-anticipated voting rights speech in Philadelphia this week, he called the fight against restrictive voting laws "the most significant test of our democracy since the Civil War" and decried what he called a "21st century Jim Crow assault" on voting rights.

But a lot of people who turned out voters to elect Biden think he's failing them in the battle for voting rights so far.

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NPR NEWS Top Stories

XINXIANG, China — First the sky darkened. Then came the rain — for three straight days.

Inside her restaurant, Wang Ana barricaded the doors in an effort to stop water from seeping in. When that didn't work, she grabbed her young son and a broom handle, using it to steady the two of them as they waded through the chin-high floodwaters back home.

"We could only hold on to each other," said Wang, a resident of Zhengzhou, the capital city of central Henan province and home to approximately 12 million people.

TOKYO — In the neighborhood where he grew up skateboarding, 22-year-old Yuto Horigome won the first ever Olympic Gold medal for skateboarding.

In the street skate competition, Horigome expertly flipped his board in the air, sailed over staircases and glided on rails. On the fourth trick of the final he accomplished a most difficult one: a "nollie 270 noseslide." After taking off, he flipped his board, then slid it down the rail on its nose.

For Mandy Bujold getting to the Tokyo Olympic Games was a fight that had nothing to do with boxing. She was effectively disqualified by the International Olympic Committee for having a baby.

"I have a child. That's a blessing, it's not a hindrance," Bujold said in an interview before her match in Tokyo today.

The Canadian boxer timed the birth around the Olympic cycle. But then the coronavirus pandemic delayed the Games, interrupted training and forced the cancellation of the May boxing qualifier in Buenos Aires for the Americas. She was out.

Updated July 25, 2021 at 7:26 AM ET

TOKYO — The U.S. women's gymnastic team took the mat for the first time at the Tokyo Olympics, and a few stumbles – including from star Simone Biles – allowed Russia's team to take the lead.

Russia came out one point ahead in the total team score – 171.62 to 170.56. Biles faced multiple penalties but still posted the top score of the day so far.

Sunday On The Beach With Sierra Leonean Soccer Players

4 hours ago

In cities around the world, there are certain traditions on Sunday mornings. Strolling in Central Park in New York. Sitting at an outdoor café in Paris. In Freetown, Sierra Leone, it's soccer on the beach.

Lumley Beach is a long strip of sand along the capital city's western edge. On Sunday mornings it bustles with joggers, walkers and large groups of soccer players. Almost every flat section of beach has been divided into soccer fields.

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