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Talkin Music: Kaleena Zanders

LA singer-songwriter Kaleena Zanders talks with Kori Stanton about how the pandemic has given her time to focus on writing and recording her own music. This vocal powerhouse has been featured on many tracks and collaborations and plans to release her own EP later this year.

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Luke Runyon / KUNC

  • Delta County moves to blue on the state's COVID dial
  • BLM will kill at least 500 wild horses from Piceance Basin herd
  • Kate Redmond reports on marijuana ordinance updates from Tuesday's Paonia trustee meeting 
  • KUNC's Luke Runyon reports Greeley's multi-million dollar water project is not without opposition

  

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

This week, we're remembering some of the more than 500,000 people in the U.S. who have died from COVID-19 through the music that gave their lives meaning. We're calling our tribute songs of remembrance. Today, Lionel Mares shares stories about his mother, Maria Angelica Mares, of Sun Valley, Calif. He says the song his mom loved was "I Walk The Line" by Johnny Cash.

(SOUNDBITE OF JOHNNY CASH SONG, "I WALK THE LINE")

Wikimedia Commons

  • Montrose Airport redirected flights to Grand Junction Saturday due to weather system malfunction
  • Residents want fewer hours of closures for Little Blue Creek Canyon Project on Highway 50
  • Pine Gulch Fire rehabilitation efforts underway for sagebrush, pinyon, juniper near Fruita
  • Roice-Hurst Humane Society helps expand Delta animal shelter with grand opening Sunday
  • CDPHE says COVID-19 vaccine supplies may increase in coming weeks
  • Renewed conversations about taxes amid revenue shortfalls in state budgets bring up menstrual equity

Suze Smith

Host Jill Spears and gardening gurus Lance Swigart and Lulu Volckhausen discuss winter gardening subjects and take your calls.

Conservatives for Responsible Stewardship

  • Delta County Memorial Hospital & 13 clinics rebranding as Delta Health
  • Animas River records record low flow, again
  • Elijah McClain: Investigation criticizes Aurora police & 'failed' internal investigation
  • Lauren Boebert amends FEC filing on mileage reimbursements
  • Critics: FCC awarded SpaceX nearly $900m for untested rural broadband project
  • Luke Runyon: Rivers in the southwest impacted by climate change
  • Kate Redmond interviews Conservatives for Responsible Stewardship president David Jenkins

Scott Franz

  • Former Ouray County Sheriff Lance FitzGerald arrested for suspected DUI again
  • Ouray's drinking water likely infiltrated by surface water
  • Hot springs in Rico now closed to non-residents
  • National Western Stock Show in Denver will return in 2022, says CEO
  • Stretch of highway from South Fork to Creede to Lake City to Blue Mesa Reservoir now a national scenic byway
  • Scott Franz reports lawmakers are responding to COVID much differently than the Spanish Flu of 1918

Renee Ramge Photography

Lizzy Plotkin & Natalie Spears talk with KVNF about their brand new album "Just Over The Ridge." This Western Colorado duo connected through Victor Wooten's Center for Music and Nature and have been playing music together ever since.

Kaspar Keil

  • Hotchkiss accepts Baker Ranches bid for Fire Mountain Canal shares, puts Overland Ditch shares out for new bids
  • Paonia in Motion virtual input gathering events scheduled for Monday - Wednesday next week
  • Grand Junction City Council marijuana task force solidifies recommendations on land use codes
  • KVNF's Kate Redmond gets an update from Paradise Theater manager Sunshine Knight
  • Laura Palmisano hears about changes to the COVID dial from CDPHE official Mara Brosy-Wiwchar 

  

CDPHE Official Explains Changes to State COVID Dial

Feb 19, 2021
CDPHE

Colorado uses an online tool called the COVID-19 dial to track the spread of the virus across the state. It rates counties on a six-color scale. Green is the lowest level. Purple is the highest. Recently, the state released a revamped version of the dial. For KVNF News, Laura Palmisano speaks to Mara Brosy-Wiwchar, with the Colorado Department of Public Health, about the changes. 

Western Slope Skies - The Sun Awakens

Feb 19, 2021
NASA/ESA

When it comes to astronomy, the dark night skies of the Western Slope command most of our attention. It can be easy to forget that the most important astronomical object actually lives in the daytime sky: the Sun!

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NPR NEWS Top Stories

2020 was a bad year for butterflies, too.

The population of monarch butterflies that migrated to Mexico to ride out the cold winter months in the north fell 26% from a year earlier, according to a new report from the Mexican government and the Word Wildlife Fund.

TikTok has agreed to pay $92 million to settle dozens of lawsuits alleging that the popular video-sharing app harvested personal data from users, including information using facial recognition technology, without consent and shared the data with third-parties, some of which were based in China.

North Dakota has lots of coal. It also has strong and consistent winds. It might be the perfect spot to showcase the long-awaited "energy transition" from climate-warming fossil fuels to climate-saving renewables.

Mac Phipps, the New Orleans-area rapper who has been in prison since being convicted on charges of manslaughter in 2001, was recommended for clemency this week. The recommendation for immediate parole by the Louisiana Board of Pardons and Committee on Parole puts the rapper, who has maintained his insistence that he is innocent of the crime he was accused of, one step closer to freedom.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Across the country, coal-burning power plants are closing. Wind turbines and solar farms are expanding. This transition cleans the air. It reduces greenhouse emissions. But it can also be painful. In North Dakota, some local officials are trying to keep a coal plant alive by blocking construction of new wind power. NPR's Dan Charles has more.

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