public health

Courtesy of The Learning Council

  • Majority of Colorado students attend school under local mask mandates, but not in Montrose, Delta, or Mesa County
  • 22 schools in Mesa County have active COVID outbreaks
  • Delta County reports first West Nile virus death
  • San Miguel County identifies 8 cases of RSV in infants & toddlers
  • Ouray County hires new county attorney
  • Mary Hockenberry's art recognized with Creative Leadership Award
  • Republican Heidi Ganahl running for Governor
  • Learning Council's Amanda Campbell talks about new Delta County CARES initiative

Delta County School District

  • Comparing & contrasting area school district dashboards reveals big differences
  • Biology professor calls Colorado Mesa University individual freedom rhetoric 'a very cynical position' given delta variant
  • San Miguel County public health director points to data on masking, asserts not requiring masks means higher COVID cases
  • Delta County Schools assistant superintendent Kurt Clay tells KVNF many students would drop out of school if a mask mandate is enforced, explains contact tracing, & shares why quarantine numbers aren't published

Justin Casey / Unsplash

  • Colorado hires marketing firm to craft public health messaging, track & respond to bogus claims
  • Mesa County offering monetary incentives to encourage COVID vaccinations
  • Two unvaccinated Denver deputies employed at the downtown jail died from COVID in May
  • KGNU's Hannah Leigh Myers speaks to director of a VA program combating veteran suicide

  • First pediatric COVID fatality recorded in Mesa County
  • Rep. Boebert says she's having the time of her life trolling liberals every day while taxpayers foot the bill
  • Public health officials urge precautions when traveling, even as more are vaccinated
  • As 12-15 year olds are now getting vaccinated against COVID, reporters Savannah Maher and Madelyn Beck share an audio postcard from youth in our region about their motivations for getting the shot

Kathleen Shannon / KDNK

  • Orchard City declares first stage of drought, meaning new fees & regulations
  • Vaccine supply outpacing demand in Mesa County
  • Pandemic EBT program extended for 2021 academic year, low-income families will receive $136/month per student learning remotely, $82/month per student in hybrid model
  • New report shows Colorado River reservoirs will drop to lowest levels ever this year
  • From KDNK: Town of Marble struggling with lack of enforcement for ATV overuse 

  

Courtesy of EZ Blockchain

  • Colorado will shift to county-led COVID rules on Friday
  • Telluride Bluegrass approved for June 11-13 in addition to June 17-20
  • Sen. Hickenlooper answers questions at first virtual Town Hall 
  • State lawmakers release more details on stimulus plan
  • Colorado River forecasts show increasing likelihood of persistent worsening drought
  • Natural gas plant operator near Moab now mining cryptocurrency

  

Scott Franz

  • Delta, Ouray, Hinsdale, Gunnison County are now Green on the state's COVID dial, while Montrose, Mesa, San Miguel County are still Blue
  • Cedaredge pot shop application process opens April 2nd
  • Governor orders flags to half-staff on Saturday in honor of Chester Riley
  • New study finds listening to nature could have significant health benefits
  • Lawmakers begin debating controversial health care plan aimed at lowering costs for those who buy insurance on the individual market because they can't get it through an employer

Terry O'Brien

  • Colorado ramping up vaccine shipments, expanding six mass vaccination sites around the state
  • Bill advancing at Capitol would cap late fees for rent payments, give tenants more time to avoid evictions
  • Governor signed bill to cancel some standardized tests at grade schools this spring, Don Coram comments
  • Kate Redmond speaks with Hotchkiss-based citizen journalist Terry O'Brien about the metrics of the COVID pandemic, and the success of the vaccine rollout so far

  

Aaron Ontiveroz / Denver Post

  • Mesa County moves from Orange to Yellow on the state's COVID dial
  • Senator Michael Bennet announced he is reintroducing his Medicare X Choice Act to create a public option Medicare Exchange healthcare plan, Kate Redmond reports
  • Governor Jared Polis delivered his annual State of the State address yesterday, Scott Franz shares highlights

  

Dr. Anuj Mehta

The RNA-based COVID-19 vaccine is a technology that has not been used with inoculations before. It is not, however, a new technology. KVNF's Kate Redmond speaks with Dr. Anuj Mehta, a pulmonary and critical care physician at Denver Health and chair of the Governor's medical advisory group on vaccine allocation, about the new vaccine. She also talks to molecular biologist and registered nurse Glen Courson about the structure and function of mRNA technology.

Gavin Dahl

Restaurants and bars are teaming up with the City of Montrose and Colorado Yurt Company to "tipi the town" in the face of COVID-19 public health restrictions. KVNF's Gavin Dahl learns more from Montrose grants coordinator Kendall Cramer, Colorado Yurt CEO John Gibson, Storm King co-owner and distiller David Fishering, and Jimmers BBQ owner Jim LaRue. 


Chad Reich

  • Open Enrollment is now available through Connect for Health Colorado
  • Ouray Silver Mines a COVID outbreak site
  • Rocky Mountain National Park mostly reopen though East Troublesome Fire only half contained
  • New job training opportunities emerge in Colorado as a result of the pandemic
  • An entire county health department staff resigned in Montana last week
  • Chad Reich reports on the Capitol Christmas tree cutting ceremony near Montrose

Wikimedia Commons

  • Leroux Creek Foods in Hotchkiss named COVID outbreak site
  • Conservation groups cheer federal distict court decision on Thompson Divide
  • Remembering Our Fallen memorial arrives in Montrose
  • Author Forrest Fenn dies
  • Trump admin to weaken habitat protections for endangered species
  • Shelley Schlender at KGNU: Fighting COVID in CU-Boulder dorms with wastewater surveillance

  • Gov. Polis bans open burning amidst 4 major Colorado wildfires
  • CDPHE releases COVID-19 guidance to help parents make school decisions
  • Eligible unemployed Coloradans can get additional money
  • New survey: Reopening schools not safe
  • Cowboy up, mask up
  • Initiative to lower state income tax qualifies for Nov. ballot
  • Air quality expert Andrea Holland shares advice. See smoke forecast outlooks here.

  • The Pine Gulch Fire was at 9,200 acres as of Wednesday afternoon and only 5% contained
  • A new report finds the worst of the COVID-19 recession may be over for Colorado
  • COGCC voted Tuesday to raise mill levy for oil & gas companies
  • Colorado voters may see as many as 11 statewide ballot questions in November
  • Public health officers across the country keep quitting

  • School district guidelines released by Colorado education officials
  • Mask mandate may not be enforced in some Western Slope counties
  • Governor Polis announces rental assistance fund to help lower eviction rates
  • Wait times for COVID-19 test results are getting longer as rates increase
  • Republican governors are losing support over their handling of the pandemic
  • Domestic abuse hotlines are seeing an uptick in calls
  • Crews are removing weeks' worth of vandalism at the State Capitol
  • In July, 3 oil and gas pipelines have shut down

  

In this edition, we discuss medical approaches to COVID-19, both traditional and alternative. To provide information about prevention and treatment from an alternative point of view, we talk with Rebecca Hitt of  Blue Dragon Acupuncture and Apothecary, and Gwendolynn Diaz of Origins Health. For the more traditional Western medicine perspective, we talk with Dr. Drew Bolton at Montrose Memorial Hospital. 

  • New bill would regulate pet sales, breeding rules in state
  • Gunnison Energy finalizes plan for North Fork Valley gas wells
  • Public Health Option pitched by Governor, resisted by hospitals

It's well-known that Americans are not getting enough sleep. But some parts of the United States do it better than others. If you bed down in Minnesota, South Dakota or Colorado, you're likely getting seven or more hours a night. But you're less in luck if you live in Hawaii, where only 56 percent of adults get enough rest.

Take a look at the latest obesity data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and you can see that the country's obesity epidemic is far from over.

Even in Colorado, the state with the lowest rate, 21.3 percent of its population is obese. Arkansas tops the list with 35.9 percent.

Delta County Sees Spike In Whooping Cough Cases

Sep 4, 2015
tissue box, sick, illness, cold
flickr/breatheindigital

Delta County is seeing a spike in pertussis, also known as whooping cough, cases. The highly contagious respiratory disease causes uncontrollable coughing and can make it difficult for people to breathe.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says whooping cough can be fatal, especially to young children under a year old.

Between July and August, Delta County saw seven confirmed cases of the disease.

Bonnie Koehler, the deputy director of the county health department, says this uptick in cases is concerning.

"What's wrong with you, buddy? What's wrong?" a man says to his dog in a video uploaded to YouTube last month. The pup moans pitifully and trips over himself. He's having trouble blinking. He gazes into nothingness; his eyes are a deep, black abyss. He's wobbling on his paws. The man's words dissolve into laughter. He knows the dog is high as a kite after thieving a potent marijuana brownie.

It's a sad state that's becoming increasingly common.

The Trading Post in Paonia is the kind of place you might expect to meet people who don’t vaccinate their kids. There’s bulk quinoa on the shelves, local potatoes in baskets and all sorts of sugar and wheat free goodies for sale near the cash register. The whole place has a decidedly crunchy, alternative vibe, and that extends to medicine. The last time I went there, the first three people I talked to told me they didn’t vaccinate their children.

Flickr user El Alvi

Colorado has one of the country's highest rates of un or undervaccinated school children. And some school districts in Western Colorado have rates five times higher than the state average. The majority of those kids have personal belief exemptions, which allow parents to easily opt out of some or all vaccines.

A bill in the statehouse would try to change that by requiring parents to talk to a doctor or watch an online class before signing a personal belief exemption. But a senate committee cut those requirements out of the bill yesterday.