public health

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  • Leroux Creek Foods in Hotchkiss named COVID outbreak site
  • Conservation groups cheer federal distict court decision on Thompson Divide
  • Remembering Our Fallen memorial arrives in Montrose
  • Author Forrest Fenn dies
  • Trump admin to weaken habitat protections for endangered species
  • Shelley Schlender at KGNU: Fighting COVID in CU-Boulder dorms with wastewater surveillance

  • Gov. Polis bans open burning amidst 4 major Colorado wildfires
  • CDPHE releases COVID-19 guidance to help parents make school decisions
  • Eligible unemployed Coloradans can get additional money
  • New survey: Reopening schools not safe
  • Cowboy up, mask up
  • Initiative to lower state income tax qualifies for Nov. ballot
  • Air quality expert Andrea Holland shares advice. See smoke forecast outlooks here.

  • The Pine Gulch Fire was at 9,200 acres as of Wednesday afternoon and only 5% contained
  • A new report finds the worst of the COVID-19 recession may be over for Colorado
  • COGCC voted Tuesday to raise mill levy for oil & gas companies
  • Colorado voters may see as many as 11 statewide ballot questions in November
  • Public health officers across the country keep quitting

  • School district guidelines released by Colorado education officials
  • Mask mandate may not be enforced in some Western Slope counties
  • Governor Polis announces rental assistance fund to help lower eviction rates
  • Wait times for COVID-19 test results are getting longer as rates increase
  • Republican governors are losing support over their handling of the pandemic
  • Domestic abuse hotlines are seeing an uptick in calls
  • Crews are removing weeks' worth of vandalism at the State Capitol
  • In July, 3 oil and gas pipelines have shut down

  

In this edition, we discuss medical approaches to COVID-19, both traditional and alternative. To provide information about prevention and treatment from an alternative point of view, we talk with Rebecca Hitt of  Blue Dragon Acupuncture and Apothecary, and Gwendolynn Diaz of Origins Health. For the more traditional Western medicine perspective, we talk with Dr. Drew Bolton at Montrose Memorial Hospital. 

  • New bill would regulate pet sales, breeding rules in state
  • Gunnison Energy finalizes plan for North Fork Valley gas wells
  • Public Health Option pitched by Governor, resisted by hospitals

It's well-known that Americans are not getting enough sleep. But some parts of the United States do it better than others. If you bed down in Minnesota, South Dakota or Colorado, you're likely getting seven or more hours a night. But you're less in luck if you live in Hawaii, where only 56 percent of adults get enough rest.

Take a look at the latest obesity data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and you can see that the country's obesity epidemic is far from over.

Even in Colorado, the state with the lowest rate, 21.3 percent of its population is obese. Arkansas tops the list with 35.9 percent.

Delta County Sees Spike In Whooping Cough Cases

Sep 4, 2015
tissue box, sick, illness, cold
flickr/breatheindigital

Delta County is seeing a spike in pertussis, also known as whooping cough, cases. The highly contagious respiratory disease causes uncontrollable coughing and can make it difficult for people to breathe.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says whooping cough can be fatal, especially to young children under a year old.

Between July and August, Delta County saw seven confirmed cases of the disease.

Bonnie Koehler, the deputy director of the county health department, says this uptick in cases is concerning.

"What's wrong with you, buddy? What's wrong?" a man says to his dog in a video uploaded to YouTube last month. The pup moans pitifully and trips over himself. He's having trouble blinking. He gazes into nothingness; his eyes are a deep, black abyss. He's wobbling on his paws. The man's words dissolve into laughter. He knows the dog is high as a kite after thieving a potent marijuana brownie.

It's a sad state that's becoming increasingly common.

The Trading Post in Paonia is the kind of place you might expect to meet people who don’t vaccinate their kids. There’s bulk quinoa on the shelves, local potatoes in baskets and all sorts of sugar and wheat free goodies for sale near the cash register. The whole place has a decidedly crunchy, alternative vibe, and that extends to medicine. The last time I went there, the first three people I talked to told me they didn’t vaccinate their children.

Flickr user El Alvi

Colorado has one of the country's highest rates of un or undervaccinated school children. And some school districts in Western Colorado have rates five times higher than the state average. The majority of those kids have personal belief exemptions, which allow parents to easily opt out of some or all vaccines.

A bill in the statehouse would try to change that by requiring parents to talk to a doctor or watch an online class before signing a personal belief exemption. But a senate committee cut those requirements out of the bill yesterday.