Gavin Dahl

Reporter / Host / Producer

Gavin Dahl is a writer and producer with a passion for community media. His resume includes work for stations like KDNK Carbondale, national programs like Alternative Radio with David Barsamian, and nonprofits like Open Media Foundation in Denver. His reporting has been published by Boulder Weekly, Boise Weekly, Raw Story, and The Austin American-Statesman. He graduated from The Evergreen State College in 2008 with a BA in media production and community organizing. 

Wyoming Fish & Game

  • State names Delta Walmart pharmacy, Delta Building Center as COVID outbreak sites
  • Affordable housing project in Ridgway to break ground next spring
  • Luke Runyon: Colorado River's largest reservoirs expected to keep struggling due to climate change
  • Scott Franz: Gray wolf reintroduction proposition will be on the statewide ballot 

  

Michael Underwood

  • Mesa County approved for final phase of COVID reopening
  • Cory Gardner makes surprise visit to Confluence Park in Delta 
  • Colorado forcing state workers to take unpaid days off due to budget shortfall
  • Migratory birds dropping dead across the region, submit data here
  • Laura Palmisano: Lake City now hosts an International Dark Sky Park

  

Local Motion: Wildish

Sep 22, 2020
Amy Berenbeim

On this week's edition of Local Motion we hear highlights from the first two episodes of Wildish, a new podcast from High Country News. Host Anna Coborn learns about federal mustang management in the not-so-wild west, introducing us to wildlife managers, landowners, and wild horse advocates. The Wild Horse and Burro Program could soon reach a breaking point. You can learn more about the series here.

Kori Stanton

  • Now 10 cases of West Nile in Delta County
  • North Fork Emergency Medical sets up permanent base in Crawford
  • State allows West Elk Coal Mine to use new road and drill pads
  • CU-Boulder study confirms aerosols spread COVID-19
  • Poll: Many Coloradans don't want COVID vaccine
  • Postal service settles suit by Secretary of State over confusing USPS mailers
  • Kori Stanton speaks with Colorado Farm & Food Alliance at gleaning party in Paonia

  

  • 10 people became U.S. citizens at Colorado National Monument
  • Matterhorn Mill south of Ophir being restored
  • Economists at the State Capitol say Colorado's budget picture is improving
  • KVNF's Laura Palmisano interviews Jason Blevins of The Colorado Sun about efforts to revitalize western Montrose County

  

MELVIN WOODY / US FOREST SERVICE

  • Grand Junction Sentinel finds contradictions in congressional candidate Boebert's claims
  • Theft and vandalism of campaign signs rampant in Ouray County
  • New trails complete at Crossroads Park in Hotchkiss 
  • Governor allows high school football this fall
  • Disability community want to make sure all eligible voters can cast

Wikimedia Commons

  • A third Delta County resident died from COVID-19, bringing the death toll in Colorado to 1,905
  • Governor Polis concerned about uptick in college student cases
  • COVID outbreaks in SLC show how kids spread the virus
  • Polis will allow 5700 people to attend next Denver Broncos game, shuttered music venues aren't happy
  • Dr Joe Adragna updates Jodi Peterson on Montrose COVID testing availability

  

  • Conservation groups sue BLM over Uncompahgre Resource Management Plan
  • 4 marijuana ballot items qualify in Delta County
  • New documents show Interior Dept wanted to manage bison like cattle
  • On Tuesday, Michael Bennet called on William Perry Pendley to resign from BLM in a speech on Senate floor

Mark Duggan / KSUT

  • Congressional candidate Lauren Boebert deletes several social media accounts 
  • Paonia will use new CDOT grant for Grand Ave projects
  • Yellow-billed cuckoo not losing Endangered Species Act protection
  • Mask mandate extended another 30 days
  • Judge rejects lawsuit delaying blue book voting guide distribution 
  • KSUT: New projects hope to close 'water gap' for Navajo Nation

  

Scott Franz

  • Cameron Peak Fire has now destroyed 54 structures
  • Beware of voter misinformation, including from USPS itself
  • KUER: Advocacy groups are calling on BLM to cancel upcoming oil and gas lease sales 
  • As Scott Franz reports, Colorado voters will get a say in doing away with the electoral college this November

Luke Runyon

  • U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree selected from Ouray Ranger District
  • Norwood Parks & Rec will get CPW trails grant
  • Confirmed COVID case numbers continue to rise
  • KBUT: Crested Butte Town Trustees vote to paint Black Lives Matter on street downtown
  • Luke Runyon: Reservoirs proposed in Northern Colorado spark debate about lack of water

  

Wikimedia Commons

  • Leroux Creek Foods in Hotchkiss named COVID outbreak site
  • Conservation groups cheer federal distict court decision on Thompson Divide
  • Remembering Our Fallen memorial arrives in Montrose
  • Author Forrest Fenn dies
  • Trump admin to weaken habitat protections for endangered species
  • Shelley Schlender at KGNU: Fighting COVID in CU-Boulder dorms with wastewater surveillance

Kaspar Keil

The live events industry has declared a red alert with over 1500 venues across the country illuminating their buildings in red at night to raise awareness about the financial strain of the pandemic. The goal is to encourage Congress to pass bipartisan legislation known as the Restart Act, sponsored by Colorado U.S. Senator Michael Bennet. KVNF’s Gavin Dahl learned more from Sen. Bennet about the proposed law earlier this summer.

Courtesy of High Country News

High Country News, the nonprofit newsmagazine headquartered in Paonia, is kicking off its 50th anniversary this week. Founded in Lander, Wyoming in 1970, the publication relocated to Paonia in 1983 under the leadership of Ed and Betsy Marston. High Country News became well known for its deep dives into the stories of the West’s complex environmental and natural resources issues, and its diverse communities and cultures.

  • Gov. Polis announces plan to spend federal aid money on getting more families connected to high-speed Internet during the pandemic
  • The Interior Department watchdog says top officials misled Congress regarding the controversial relocation of the Bureau of Land Management headquarters to Grand Junction
  • KVNF's Gavin Dahl speaks with High Country News publisher & executive director Greg Hanscom about the magazine's 50th anniversary

  • New COVID data shows Mesa and Montrose County with medium rates of infection, Delta and Gunnison County with high rates, and Ouray and San Miguel with very high rates
  • Fighting Colorado's four biggest wildfires has cost $77 million so far
  • A new statewide campaign for more responsible recreation is now underway as Joe Lewandowski from Colorado Parks & Wildlife tells KVNF's Jodi Peterson
  • KSUT's Mark Duggan shares how one Coloradan is using "bots" for good on the Internet

Gavin Dahl

As area wildlife manager for Montrose since 2006, Renzo DelPiccolo’s responsibilities at Colorado Parks and Wildlife included law enforcement for hunting, tracking poachers, managing wildlife conflicts with bears and elk, public education, and advising land use planners on wildlife impacts. Over the course of a 33-year career at CPW, Renzo considers his work helping create new wildlife areas for permanent protection and reintroducing moose to the Grand Mesa among his biggest accomplishments. We spoke on his last day before retirement.

  • Congressional candidates Diane Mitsch Bush, Lauren Boebert agree on protecting Western Slope water
  • Delta County reports second COVID-19 death
  • Town of Cedaredge trustees remove planning commission vice chair James Ayers
  • Fort Mojave Indian Tribe seeks a new national monument in Nevada
  • Renzo DelPiccolo speaks to KVNF on his last day after 33 years at Colorado Parks & Wildlife

rawpixel.com

  • State Supreme Court declines mask mandate lawsuit
  • Senator Cory Gardner touts Grand Junction Airport grant
  • 1800 pounds of marijuana seized in local raids
  • Back the Badge allegedly used taxpayer money in violation of state law
  • Utility shut off moratoriums end
  • 11 statewide initiatives qualified for Nov ballot
  • KOTO's Matt Hoisch on Telluride resort's plans

  • Honda settles defective airbag suit with Colorado for $1.6M
  • Ouray County offering free COVID testing Aug. 31 & Sep. 1, giving up on mask compliance
  • No charges filed against officers who shot David Martin 17 times in Fruita
  • State says West Elk Mine may have violated the law
  • House Republican sues Gov. Polis over mask mandate
  • Airline industry may not recover for several years
  • KDNK's Kathleen Shannon learns about pandemic EBT from Hunger Free Colorado

  • Firefighters are finally gaining ground on area wildfires
  • The Pioneer Town Museum in Cedaredge hosts Sunday Farmer's Markets
  • Delta County Democrats launching a mobile campaign HQ
  • Local reservoirs are shrinking in the heat
  • CPW biologist sees gray wolf pup
  • Colorado to distribute millions in coronavirus aid to small businesses
  • KOTO's Julia Caulfield reports Shakespeare in the Park must go on

Erin McIntyre

Passionate hyper-local reporting in the public interest can come at a cost.  For Erin McIntyre, co-publisher of The Ouray County Plaindealer, critical reporting on defiance of county health measures during the pandemic led to retaliation from a local business.

Amber Share

  • I-70 reopened through Glenwood Canyon, traffic doubled on U.S. 50 near Gunnison during the closure
  • Grand Junction has felt record temperatures this month
  • Western Slope voters will have more official ballot drop boxes to choose from
  • Gov. Polis now allowing bars to stay open until 11pm
  • Two lawsuits seek ouster of William Perry Pendley at BLM
  • KSJD's Daniel Rayzel reports on hilarious 'Subpar Parks' posters by Amber Share

Courtesy of Bruce Noble

Bruce Noble is the retired superintendent of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park and Curecanti Recreation Area. He and an all-star team of other veteran leaders with a combined 179 years of service to the national park system are advocating for passage of the CORE Act by Congress.

  • Updated COVID-19 numbers for the region
  • Bureau of Land Management dispute with conservation groups headed to court
  • Retired Black Canyon National Park superintendent Bruce Noble speaks with Gavin Dahl about why he and other Park Service veterans are advocating for Congress to pass the CORE Act
  • Paonia Town Administrator Corinne Ferguson speaks with Jodi Peterson about new voluntary water restriction

  • Firefighters got a new wildfire near Carbondale under control quickly
  • Paonia, Hotchkiss, Crawford ask residents to reduce water use
  • Jere Lowe will challenge Wendell Koontz for Delta County Commission
  • Montrose, Olathe sales tax up during June
  • Paonia, Grand Junction will vote on new ballot measures
  • Local residents Bob Kalenak, Allison Elliot, Thomas Markle, Danielle Carre share their concerns about Land Use Code changes proposed by Delta County ahead of public comment deadline

  • Gov. Polis bans open burning amidst 4 major Colorado wildfires
  • CDPHE releases COVID-19 guidance to help parents make school decisions
  • Eligible unemployed Coloradans can get additional money
  • New survey: Reopening schools not safe
  • Cowboy up, mask up
  • Initiative to lower state income tax qualifies for Nov. ballot
  • Air quality expert Andrea Holland shares advice. See smoke forecast outlooks here.

  • Town of Paonia begins voluntary watering restrictions
  • Reservoir on Cerro Summit nearly operational again
  • Low cost spay & neuter clinic in Delta this week
  • Colorado partnering with private labs to speed up COVID testing
  • AG Weiser considering legal action to protect USPS
  • COVID-19 a leading cause of death in Colorado
  • Intern Carmen Rodriguez talks to youth about how they spent the summer

Courtesy of Montrose Library

This week on Local Motion, KVNF's Gavin Dahl speaks with Delta County librarian Sarah Smith and Montrose County librarians Elizabeth Cook and Amy Dickinson about getting creative to serve kids this summer. Though libraries were forced to close for several months by the coronavirus pandemic, area libraries found ways to help kids keep busy, improve literacy, and stay connected.

  • Montrose County Public Health reported 5 new COVID-19 cases since Aug. 10
  • Bureau of Reclamation increasing releases into Gunnison River
  • Poll finds Mitsch Bush, Boebert tied in Third District
  • Trump plans to withdraw Pendley nomination for BLM
  • Should we be naming heat waves?
  • Laura Palmisano reports on record-breaking home sales in Colorado

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