Colorado Bureau of Investigation

rawpixel.com

  • State Supreme Court declines mask mandate lawsuit
  • Senator Cory Gardner touts Grand Junction Airport grant
  • 1800 pounds of marijuana seized in local raids
  • Back the Badge allegedly used taxpayer money in violation of state law
  • Utility shut off moratoriums end
  • 11 statewide initiatives qualified for Nov ballot
  • KOTO's Matt Hoisch on Telluride resort's plans

License plate scanners have become a fact of life. They're attached to traffic lights, on police cars — even "repo" staff use them. All those devices have created a torrent of data, raising new concerns about how it's being stored and analyzed.

Bryce Newell's laptop is filled with the comings and goings of Seattle residents. The data comes from the city's license plate scanner, acquired from the police through public disclosure requests. He plugs in a license plate number, uncovering evidence of long-forgotten errands.

There's not a whole lot to do in prison, so inmates spend a fair amount of time playing cards.

For several years, law enforcement officials around the country have been putting that prisoners' pastime to good use. They've been putting facts and photos from unsolved crimes in front of prisoners' eyes by printing them on decks of cards, hoping to generate leads.