retirement

  • Capitol Coverage: two Democratic state lawmakers will not run for re-election
  • State legislative session opens Wednesday, Western Slope lawmakers prepare
  • Ballot initiative to reintroduce gray wolves to state has enough signatures
  • More than half country and state residents are unable to save for retirement
  • Mysterious drones continue to fly grid patterns over Eastern Plains

  • Town of Paonia remains on boil water advisory, looking for leak
  • Dept of Health issues temporary closure notices for businesses in Paonia
  • Colorado attorney general joins lawsuit against Trump's declaration
  • Bill to save retirement for nearly 1 million state residents debated
  • Controversial sex education bill passes in State House

  • Capitol Conversation discusses end of session, unraveling priorities
  • Statewide support for creation of Colorado retirement program
  • 3.5 magnitude earthquakes trembles near Rangely over weekend

According to state and federal census figures, Colorado's population is expected to grow by an additional 2.3 million people by 2040. That's going to significantly impact the way we live – from traffic congestion, to water, to quality of life.

Most noticeably will be a shift to an older population.

Harriet Kelly has one word to describe the day she stopped driving four years ago: miserable.

"It's no fun when you give up driving," she says. "I just have to say that."

Kelly, who lives in Denver, says she was in her 80s when she noticed her eyesight declining. She got anxious driving on the highway, so decided to stop before her kids made the move for her.

"I just told them I'd stop driving on my birthday — my 90th birthday — and I did. And I was mad at myself because I did it," she says, laughing. "I thought I was still pretty good!"