Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Courtesy of Teya Cranson

  • CDC investigated elder care facilities in Mesa County, where unvaccinated staff are believed to be bringing COVID-19 to work
  • CPW held public input session on wolf reintroduction in Montrose
  • For 3rd time in 3 years, buying water from Ruedi Reservoir to offset low streamflow in Colorado River
  • School District 51 hires new director of equity & inclusion
  • Families in Colorado are already benefiting from advance child tax credit payments
  • Paradise Theatre to screen new doc Where We Belong by local filmmaker Teya Cranson

Moe Clark / Colorado Newsline

  • Communities of color in Colorado, at greatest risk of death from COVID-19, too commonly face infection without health insurance: Open Enrollment is ongoing through January 15
  • Reporter Moe Clark talks about her story on grassroots efforts to distribute survival gear to people living on the street, as the pandemic causes more homelessness, limiting shelter capacity, and Denver sweeps encampments against CDC recommendations

Brace yourselves: Flu season is coming. And along with the coughing, fevers and aches, you can expect a lot of unreliable or downright wrong information about the flu vaccine.

Many people underestimate the health risks from flu. Thousands of Americans die from flu-related complications in a typical year, and last season's H1N1 strain hit young adults particularly hard.

California's historic drought is partly to blame for the recent rise in West Nile virus infections, public health officials say. There have been 311 cases reported so far, double the number of the same time last year, and the most of any state in the country.

West Nile virus is spread by mosquitoes. They contract the virus when they feed on infected birds, then spread it to the birds they bite next. A shortage of water can accelerate this cycle.

Just 82 children have confirmed cases of enterovirus-D68, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but hospitals around the country say they are treating hundreds more children who have been sickened by the rare virus.

A rarely seen virus is sending children to the hospital with severe respiratory infections, and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning doctors and parents to be on the alert.

"Hospitalizations are higher than would be expected at this time of year," Dr. Anne Schuchat, head of infectious diseases for the CDC, said Monday at a press briefing on enterovirus 68. "The situation is evolving quickly."