western colorado

Feras Abdallah / PLA, LEED® Green Associate™

As we face one of the worst droughts in modern history, trees can help us fight the challenges of heat, dryness, dust and mental fatigue. Street trees offer immense benefits and we need to do as much as we can to care for them! With trees, bigger is better as many of the positive attributes they offer exponentially increase with the tree’s size.

Calla Rose Ostrander

Water is life. It makes up 71% of Earth’s body and 60% of ours. An essential element it is often characterized by being in motion: flowing, ebbing, falling, freezing, melting, vaporizing, condensensing. Water is ever cycling through its different states of being, as a gas (vapor), a liquid (water), and a solid (ice).

Kori Stanton

Happy Winter Solstice on Dec 21st, 2020! As we snuggle down into the deepest nights of the year KVNF’s Calla Rose Ostrander explores the ways in which human society is already oriented around the workings of the Earth, the heavens and how the planet and its many forms of life and relationships interweave with and shape our own. 

Calla Rose Ostrander

When people think about what compost is, a few things tend to come to mind: first pretty much everyone, republican or democrat, city dweller or rural resident, thinks its good, I haven't met a farmer who didn't like it and people in cities tend to think of it in connection with beautiful things like community gardens or their grandparents backyards and old farms.  

Aaron Watson - Dark Skies Paonia

The Beaver, or Full Frost Moon is the name of this season’s luna llena. With the moonlight sparkling on a heavy frost and a beaver moving into a new bend of one of the ditches that runs by my house, I think it is well named. Our question this week was, why is the Moon bigger when it rises?

Kori Stanton

It behooves those of us who live in the West to think proactively about how to fight desertification. At this point, if we are not actively making choices to do so we will become desertified. The basic thing to understand is that anything which decreases the ability of the land to retain water, or increases the rate at which water leaves the land is adding to the problem. Anything that slows water down and helps it stick around is the solution.

Kori Stanton

KVNF discusses the impacts of continuous hot and dry weather in Western Colorado with Reagan Waskom, Director, Colorado Water Institute, Colorado State University, Harrison Topp, Topp Fruits, Kate Greenberg, Colorado Commissioner of Agriculture, and rancher, Cynthia Houseweart, Princess Beef.

Kori Stanton

Here on Rain & Shine we are looking at ways we can protect our communities from desertification in the face of a destabilizing climate by slowing down the rate at which water moves through our landscapes.

Adam Smith

Here on the western slope we have been blessed with a combination of warmth from the desert combined with steady streams of water that flow down from the mountains in our rivers. This lovely combination makes our area agriculturally rich and abundant, allowing us to grow crops that cannot be grown anywhere else in the Rocky Mountain region.  But living on the edge of a desert means it's all too easy for us to become a desert too!

Calla Rose Ostrander

Indegenious cultures have historically practiced agriculture from a position that is deeply centered in a particular landscape. There was little difference between “wild” and “farmed” in cultures indegenious to the land called Turtle Island. This led to relationships which sought to understand and work within the natural cycles and patterns of the elements, plants and animals, supporting and caring for them in ways yielded the food supply needed to sustain the many people who called the land home. 

Neil Palmer

Nitrogen is the basis of fertility. It’s the base of the amino acids that make up our DNA and the proteins in our bodies. Nitrogen is a common limiting nutrient in nature, and agriculture, meaning that naturally it is in the shortest supply and limits growth.

Carbon Cycle Energy (C2e)

The excessive burning of fossil fuels and mismanagement of forests and soils have released vast amounts of terrestrial and fossil carbon into the atmosphere throwing the global carbon cycle, that underpins life as we know it, out of the balance. But there are ways we can help rebalance the cycle.  Of course we have to stop burning so many fossil fuels. We can also pull the excess carbon out of the atmosphere and give it back to the soil.  Unlike more carbon in the atmosphere, more carbon in the soil is good for us. It makes soil healthy! Healthy soil makes healthy food and that's good for everyone. 

Calla Rose Ostrander

In mid September 2020 the biggest cold snap in the history of the western united states occurred in southwest Colorado. Just a few weeks earlier raging wildfires in California and Oregon forced the early migration of thousands of songbirds. Stressed from early migration, underfed and experiencing the sudden cold, thousands of birds died and many many more panicked. 

Kori Stanton

The way we manage water has largely been focused on quantity and quality. This has led to a scarcity mentality where we are faced with there not being “enough” water immediately available. When we step back and look at the way water moves throughout the planet-in large and small water cycles- we can begin to see that all the water there is, is still there.

Ryan Maye Handy

Colorado's Commissioner of Agriculture, Kate Greenberg, talks with KVNF's Kori Stanton on August 26th, 2020. Greenberg gives KVNF listeners an  update on what's going on at the Colorado Department of Agriculture in the middle of the pandemic and answers questions from Western Slope farmers, ranchers and producers.

Kori Stanton

Snowpack was good in winter 2019/2020 so why did our rivers get low so early? The snow melted early and extraordinarily quickly this spring. This along with a combination of effects from a rapidly changing climate are colliding to cause dramatic shifts in how water interacts with our landscape. 

In the middle of the pandemic small businesses are having to pivot quickly and discover new ways to offer services and products to their customers. KVNF talks with Chelsea Rosty, Director of Business Innovation & Tourism for the city of Montrose, CO and DART about how local businesses are creatively navigating through COVID.

Dream Catcher Therapy Center

KVNF explores Equine-Assisted Therapy aka "Horse Therapy" at Dream Catcher Therapy Center in Olathe, CO. The therapy center houses over 50 rescued horses and works hand-in-hand with End of the Trail Rescue which rescues horses and cares for them until "the end of their lives." Equine therapy offers a different approach to trauma related therapy as well as physical and mental health treatment. Therapy programs are offered to ages two and up.

  • Move to protect wildlife migration corridors fueled by growth concerns
  • Capitol Coverage of Governor Polis executive order protecting wildlife
  • Food banks around Colorado face deadline to help local farmers
  • Governor Polis calls for independent investigation of Colorado Springs shooting
  • Report says Western Colorado warming faster than other regions of country

Laura Elizabeth

Farmers on the Western Slope often struggle to find enough workers. More and more of them are turning to hiring foreign farmhands through a federal program, H-2A. This program provides a legal way for workers to come to the U.S., earn money on farms, and return home. KVNF's Kori Stanton talks to H-2A agent, Kim Noland from Palisade, CO to get a better understanding of the program, how farmers can apply and how she assists farmers and foreign workers through the entire process.

Kori Stanton

The 2018 Farm Bill was officially passed on December 20th, 2018. The '18 Farm Bill is extremely vast and covers many topics including Industrial Hemp. The farm bill descheduled some cannabis products from the Controlled Substances Act for the first time. KVNF's Kori Stanton sought out to learn how this new farm bill will affect our local farmers in Western Colorado.

Doug Tucker

The first batch of Colorado's recreational marijuana stores opened this month on New Years Day in Telluride, Breckenridge and Denver among other places, marking the beginning of what's expected to be a multi-million dollar industry.

KDNK

The first recreational marijuana shop west of Breckenridge along I-70 is now open for business in Carbondale.

KDNK's Ed Williams reports that long lines and high taxes are not deterring a steady stream of customers at the shop, called the Doctor's Garden.

Travis Bubenik/KVNF

KVNF recently spoke in Ridgway with Susan Long, manager for the Ouray County Fairgrounds as well as the 4-H Events Center for the past eight years. 

Ms. Long and I spent an afternoon touring the rodeo grounds and talking about the association's plans to renovate the fairgrounds' historic WWII-era grandstands, as well as the aging announcer's booth and bucking shoots. 

Long says the planned renovations are aimed at increasing safety and bringing more outdoor to the grounds, all while preserving the unique western heritage of the region.

Anda Rojs Smalls

Unlike other Western states, Colorado’s moose population is growing. It’s healthier than ever with an estimated 2300 moose across the state. While other states are grappling with why their herds are shrinking, Colorado is studying the population’s fast growth. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

Anda Rojs Smalls has lived in the Aspen area for over a decade. But, it was just recently that she saw a moose.

"My first moose sighting was about two years ago, in the summertime, with my kids up at the Maroon Lake," she says.

Patty Kaech-Feder

Though we’re barely a week into August, some signs of fall have started to appear in western Colorado.

KVNF Local Newscast: Wednesday, May 15, 2013.

May 15, 2013

Headlines:

  • April showers: an aberration, not a trend
  • Sounds of the High Country: Idaho’s political polarization
  • Number of children needing fostering and adoption soars
  • Ozone violations in Western Colorado for the first time
  • Parachute Leak Update
  • Growing A Local Beer, Farm To Glass

iSeeChange: Mosquitoes and West Nile

Sep 12, 2012
mosquito
Andrew Cranson

Last week, the Delta County Health department reported three additional cases of West Nile Virus among residents. That brings the total number of confirmed and suspect human cases of the virus in the county to 20–most of which have resulted in uncomplicated fever. Most of the reported cases have been in the Delta and North Fork areas, and on Saturday, the town of Hotchkiss sprayed to kill adult mosquitoes. For KVNF and the iSeeChange project, Julia Kumari Drapkin takes a closer look at why mosquitoes and West Nile Virus are thriving in a DROUGHT year and whether community efforts to spray late in the season will pay off.

Produced by Julia Kumari Drapkin, the iSeeChange project at KVNF is part of Localore, a nationwide production of AIR designed to accelerate transformation and extend public service media to all Americans.   KVNF was selected as one of  only 10 Localore stations across the country—learn more at airmediaworks.org. Localore is funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Wyncote Foundation, the John T. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Interactive storytelling partner Zeega co-produced TheAlmanac.org with iSeeChange.