CDC

Courtesy of Montrose School District

  • Telluride schools went on lockdown on Tuesday due to a credible threat, one person taken into custody
  • Ouray, Ridgway, Denver schools will require staff and students to wear masks
  • Mesa County School Board members escorted to cars by police after public comments devolved into threats on Tuesday night
  • Montrose School District public information officer Matt Jenkins stops by Studio M to answer questions about masks, COVID tests, vaccines, and transparent decision-making

  

Kate Redmond

  • COVID transmission in Delta County now 'substantial'
  • Delta County Schools returning in-person with no mask mandate, despite CDC recommendations
  • Cedaredge trustees select retail marijuana vendors
  • USDA endorses Colorado proposal to grow hemp industry
  • State investigation of Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters could lead to criminal charges
  • Curecanti Rec Area designated dark sky park
  • Kate Redmond catches up with Julia Kumari Drapkin who launched I See Change at KVNF

  

Megan Johnson / Montana Public Radio

  • As CDC updates mask guidance to recommend wearing them indoors regardless of vaccination status, Delta County School District is not requiring them for any student or staff member
  • Montrose County names Jon Waschbusch as County Manager
  • Montrose County Fair & Rodeo runs through Sunday
  • Colorado has a new tourism director
  • Booming demand for rental cars leads residents to rent out their own cars to strangers

  

Laura Palmisano

  • Colorado has expiring COVID vaccines
  • Five startups attracted investments at Greater Colorado Venture Fund's pitch contest
  • Telluride voters to consider short-term rental limits
  • New Hotchkiss Marshal Scott Green lays out priorities
  • 4 horses rescued from I-70
  • Colorado's reinsurance program may help end increases in health insurance costs
  • 20 people spent the night on the Alpine Loop in Hinsdale County due to mudslides

  

Courtesy of Teya Cranson

  • CDC investigated elder care facilities in Mesa County, where unvaccinated staff are believed to be bringing COVID-19 to work
  • CPW held public input session on wolf reintroduction in Montrose
  • For 3rd time in 3 years, buying water from Ruedi Reservoir to offset low streamflow in Colorado River
  • School District 51 hires new director of equity & inclusion
  • Families in Colorado are already benefiting from advance child tax credit payments
  • Paradise Theatre to screen new doc Where We Belong by local filmmaker Teya Cranson

  • CDC & CDPHE face confusion, paranoia about efforts to fight COVID in Mesa County
  • Reporter Sandra Fish tracks political spending of Colorado Rockies owner Dick Monfort
  • KGNU's Dave Ashton speaks to state senator Julie Gonzales and Denver County Clerk & Recorder Paul Lopez at All Star Voting Rights Rally in Denver, ahead of the MLB All-Star game tonight at Coors Field

  

Courtesy of KZMU

  • Delta County Commissioners oppose forthcoming 'Protect Animals from Unnecessary Suffering & Exploitation' ballot initiative 
  • CDOT has a bridge to sell you
  • CDC: Coloradans suffered dizziness from anxiety, not Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine
  • Lawmakers unveil transportation bill that adds fees to ride shares & deliveries
  • Cops face discipline on Eastern Plains, in Denver
  • Lawmakers vote on new gun control bills this week
  • Archaeologist Don Montoya talks to KZMU about vandalism at Birthing Rock petroglyphs near Moab

Scott Franz

  • Colorado teachers now have rapid COVID self-tests from the state
  • CDC says ventilation indoors can cut down spread of COVID, but what makes for good ventilation?
  • Capitol Coverage: Colorado lawmakers considering $1B stimulus proposal in response to pandemic
  • Paonia town administrator Corinne Ferguson discusses notices sent to residents last week about lead exceeding permitted levels at six specific testing sites, and outlines next steps

Moe Clark / Colorado Newsline

  • Communities of color in Colorado, at greatest risk of death from COVID-19, too commonly face infection without health insurance: Open Enrollment is ongoing through January 15
  • Reporter Moe Clark talks about her story on grassroots efforts to distribute survival gear to people living on the street, as the pandemic causes more homelessness, limiting shelter capacity, and Denver sweeps encampments against CDC recommendations

  • Montrose Memorial Hospital recognized as #1 rural hospital in Colorado
  • City of Grand Junction reports May sales tax was down 8.6 percent from last year
  • Over 600 outbreak specialists are urgently calling for a bigger role for the CDC
  • The president's nominee to head the BLM is facing renewed pushback
  • Changes to the BLM's September oil and gas lease sale are still possible

Take a look at the latest obesity data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and you can see that the country's obesity epidemic is far from over.

Even in Colorado, the state with the lowest rate, 21.3 percent of its population is obese. Arkansas tops the list with 35.9 percent.

Delta County Sees Spike In Whooping Cough Cases

Sep 4, 2015
tissue box, sick, illness, cold
flickr/breatheindigital

Delta County is seeing a spike in pertussis, also known as whooping cough, cases. The highly contagious respiratory disease causes uncontrollable coughing and can make it difficult for people to breathe.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says whooping cough can be fatal, especially to young children under a year old.

Between July and August, Delta County saw seven confirmed cases of the disease.

Bonnie Koehler, the deputy director of the county health department, says this uptick in cases is concerning.

Newscast

  • News rules proposed for coal mines
  • Revenue Silver Mine owner defaults on payments
  • Waldorf type school in Paonia now officially a reality
  • Two deceased campers identified, carbon monoxide poisoning a possibility
  • CDC Issues Guidelines For Backyard Chicken Flocks
  • What's next for the Creamery Arts Center in Hotchkiss?

Don't kiss your chickens!

That's the message from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is blaming a salmonella outbreak on backyard chicken owners being overly affectionate with their flocks.

The CDC says more than 180 people have come down with salmonella across the U.S. this year from contact with backyard poultry. Thirty-three of them became so sick they required hospitalization.

There's no getting around the strangeness of a map that shows the most distinctive cause of death in each of our 50 states and the District of Columbia.

In Texas, it's tuberculosis. In Maine, it's the flu. And in Nevada, it's the ominous "legal intervention."

But what does it mean to label a cause of death distinctive?

Federal health officials Monday changed the recommended amount of fluoride in drinking water for the first time since 1962, cutting by almost half the maximum amount of fluoride that should be added to drinking supplies.

The Department of Health and Human Services recommended 0.7 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water instead of the long-standing range of 0.7 to 1.2 milligrams.

A farm in Iowa is going to destroy more than five million of its chickens in an attempt to curb the spread of the highly infectious avian flu.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the H5N2 avian influenza outbreak Monday, adding that the agency says that there is little chance that humans could become infected. According to the department's press release:

While a cure for cancer remains elusive, we already know how to keep many cases of the disease from developing in the first place.

People can reduce cancer risks by keeping a healthful weight and avoiding cigarettes.

But smoking, obesity and other major cancer risk factors remain common, and they still vary widely across the country.

A national survey confirms earlier indications that e-cigarettes are now more popular among teenage students than traditional cigarettes and other forms of tobacco, federal health officials reported Thursday.

The findings prompted strong warnings from Dr. Tom Frieden, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about the effects of any form of nicotine on young people.

"We want parents to know that nicotine is dangerous for kids at any age," Frieden said.

It's not the salt shakers on our tables that explain why Americans consume way too much sodium. It's the processed foods we buy in grocery stores.

In an ideal world, we'd all be eating copious amounts of nutrient-dense foods such as fruits and vegetables — and getting all the essential vitamins and nutrients our bodies need for optimal health.

But, as a nation, we're far from that healthful eating ideal.

We may be in for a nasty flu season. That's the warning out today from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC is worried because the most common strain of flu virus circulating in the United States is one called H3N2. In previous years, H3N2 strains have tended to send more people to the hospital than other strains — and cause more deaths, especially among the elderly, children and people with other health problems.

Diabetes is an expensive disease to treat, costing the United States $244 billion in 2012, according to an analysis of the disease's economic burden.

When the loss of productivity due to illness and disability is added in, the bill comes to $322 billion, or $1,000 a year for each American, including those without diabetes. That's 48 percent higher than the same benchmark in 2007; not a healthy trend.

The increase is being driven by a growing and aging population, the report finds, as well as more common risk factors like obesity, and higher medical costs.

Update on Oct. 8: The Ebola patient in Dallas, the first diagnosed with the virus in the U.S., has died.

Holy moly! There's a case of Ebola in the U.S.!

That first reaction was understandable. There's no question the disease is scary. The World Health Organization now estimates that the virus has killed about 70 percent of people infected in West Africa.

When essayist Eula Biss was pregnant with her son, she decided she wanted to do just a bit of research into vaccination. "I thought I would do a small amount of research to answer some questions that had come up for me," she tells NPR's Audie Cornish. "And the questions just got bigger the more I learned and the more I read."

For the first time in nearly two decades, federal money is beginning to flow into gun violence research. And there's growing momentum behind creating a reliable national reporting database for firearm injuries and deaths.

On the front lines at the Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center, one of the top trauma hospitals on the West Coast, researchers like Dr. Demetrios Demetriades hope to get a better picture of the scope of the problem, so states can better target their prevention programs.

CDC

Diabetes is a huge issue for Americans. 

Just 82 children have confirmed cases of enterovirus-D68, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but hospitals around the country say they are treating hundreds more children who have been sickened by the rare virus.

A rarely seen virus is sending children to the hospital with severe respiratory infections, and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning doctors and parents to be on the alert.

"Hospitalizations are higher than would be expected at this time of year," Dr. Anne Schuchat, head of infectious diseases for the CDC, said Monday at a press briefing on enterovirus 68. "The situation is evolving quickly."

CDC's Black Lung Screening Unit Stops In Colorado

Jun 12, 2014
black lung mobile screening unit
Laura Palmisano

The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention is offering black lung screenings across the West. 

The National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety, a division of the CDC, has a mobile unit that travels around the United States to screen coal miners for the disease.

The unit recently stopped in Colorado.