Jodi Peterson

News Director

Jodi Peterson grew up on Colorado’s Front Range and attended Colorado State University, earning a B.A. in English and an M.A. in communication development. She spent 16 years working as a technical communicator with computer company Hewlett-Packard, then made a career shift to journalism. In 2005, she became news editor for the award-winning nonprofit newsmagazine High Country News; later she served as its managing editor for five years. In 2017, she went part-time as a contributing editor. Jodi was hired as KVNF’s news director in April 2019, and is excited to help the organization expand and improve its news coverage.

Kirk Siegler

  • Public land fire restrictions lifted after rain, snow
  • Arguments for and against Colorado's Proposition 116 to reduce income tax
  • Denver ballot measure addresses homelessness crisis
  • Interview with Bureau of Land Management de-facto director William Perry Pendley
  • Snowboarders who reported themselves after triggering an avalanche face criminal charges

Ron Parker

  • Colorado hospitals could be overwhelmed if COVID-19 spike continues
  • Montrose County has new outbreaks
  • Mesa County sees climbing COVID-19 infection rates, may return to tighter restrictions
  • KDNK's Kathleen Shannon analyzes ballot measure 7A to increase taxes for the Colorado River District

Delta County Sheriff's Department

On this edition of Local Motion, we’ll discuss two Delta County ballot measures. Delta County residents are being asked to vote on a Back the Badge measure that would institute a special public safety tax to help fund law enforcement. And the  towns of Paonia and Cedaredge are each considering allowing sales of medical and recreational marijuana, and taxing those sales to create additional revenue. 

Grace Ramsey

  • COVID-19 testing site in Montrose will relocate later this month
  • Montrose gets a fast charging station for electric vehicles
  • Montrose High School announces another COVID-19 case
  • Fire restrictions lifted on many public lands
  • Gov. Polis is pardoning thousands of people convicted of possessing small amounts of marijuana
  • Hopes for better monitoring of oil and gas emissions
  • A visit with the Mural Militia, a North Fork Valley art project

Laurie Milford

On this week’s edition, we’re taking a look at how the school year is going so far. The COVID-19  pandemic has upended so much of our daily life, and that’s especially evident in education, where schools, teachers, parents and students have had to adjust to new procedures, changed expectations and different ways of learning.

  • Montrose County seeks move to less restrictive pandemic guidelines
  • Montrose COVID-19 testing moves to County Event Center
  • Great Outdoors Colorado funds Western Slope projects for outdoor recreation, land protection
  • Fatal motorcycle crashes up 12% reports CDOT
  • Colorado voters age 50+ are not a ‘lock’ for either US Senate candidate
  • Economic recovery has been faster on the Western Slope, says CMU professor

AJ Carrillo

Colorado’s North Fork Valley is well known for its small farms, producing some of the state’s finest fruits, vegetables, and meats. KVNF visited one such small farm earlier this summer,  DeerTree Farm near Hotchkiss. It’s owned by AJ and Nicole Carrillo, a couple in their early 30s.

  • Despite rains, extreme drought persists; Paonia, Crawford and Hotchkiss still under water restrictions
  • Town of Paonia comments on Delta County draft land use plan
  • One of the last natural gas companies in the Piceance Basin has filed for bankruptcy
  • Wolves spotted in northwest Colorado last winter may have been killed in Wyoming
  • Six states that rely on the Colorado River have issues with proposed Utah pipeline
  • Warming climate causes toxic algae outbreaks in local lakes and rivers
  • COVID-19 testing widely available in Delta County

  • Gov. Polis announces more funding for organizations helping with pandemic relief
  • Montrose County provides grants to small businesses in Region 10
  • Montrose County applies for more marijuana enforcement funding
  • Colorado Outdoors project in Montrose makes progress on trail, river restoration and housing
  • Neighboring Idaho counties with different COVID-19 policies have very different hospitalization rates
  • College towns sound very different without marching bands for football

Lon&Queta/Creative Commons

With major wildfires in Colorado this summer and a hotter, drier climate predicted across the West, many of us are wondering what our beloved forests will look like in a few decades.

A new University of Colorado Boulder-led study offers a glimpse into the future, suggesting that when forests burn across the Southern Rocky Mountains, many will not grow back and will instead convert to grasslands and shrublands.

KVNF spoke to Kyle Rodman, the study's lead author, about what landscapes might look like after the Pine Gulch and Grizzly Creek fires.

  • New report shows that during the pandemic, households with children face highest hardship rates
  • COVID-19 vaccine could be made available before clinical trials are complete, says FDA
  • Vail Resorts will require reservations to ski next season -- but not for employees
  • New study finds that many burned forests in Colorado may not regrow, due to hotter, drier conditions

Los Angeles Public Library

This week's program is a special documentary from Making Contact. In LA 50 years ago, 30,000 mostly Chicanos peacefully protested the disproportionate number of Latinos dying on the frontlines in Vietnam. They came from across the country to also protest substandard education, racism, police violence, and other issues negatively affecting Latinos. What started out as a peaceful march ended with an attack by riot-clad police, 400 arrests, and the deaths of four people. 

  • Grand Junction protesters concerned over US Postal Service changes
  • Rundown of the nine measures now qualified for the November ballot
  • Delicious Orchard's Jeff Schwartz says lack of oil and gas ballot measures gives opportunity to local businesses
  • State lawmakers will loan a vandalized monument to a Denver museum
  • New survey shows Americans have a lot of misconceptions about immigrants

Laura Palmisano

  • Ballot measure would limit state government enterprises
  • Montrose Police Department welcomes three new officers
  • Grand Junction defense contractor Capco Inc. awarded major contract
  • Gov. Polis reviews school safety measures
  • Self-sufficient Westerners still support government relief spending
  • Movie theatres are starting to reopen on the Western Slope

      

Holly Rubinstein

KVNF spoke with the mayors of the tourism-dependent towns of Ouray and Ridgway to see how they're holding up during the pandemic.

San Juan Habitat for Humanity

More than three-quarters of Western Slope residents say that affordable housing is a serious problem in their community, ranking it above crime and infrastructure as a concern. In this edition of Local Motion, which originally aired July 15, 2019 and was updated in July 2020, we delve into the housing crisis, and talk about how it affects communities and families across the KVNF listening area.

Alexander Andreev - Creative Commons

This encore edition of Local Motion focuses on mental health. Originally aired Sept. 24, 2019, it was updated in July 2020 with information about mental health issues during the pandemic. Many Western Slope residents struggle with depression, anxiety, substance abuse and even thoughts of suicide. The Surgeon General of the U.S. has said that one in four people experiences some form of mental illness, and the rates of those illnesses are highest in the American West. KVNF's Jodi Peterson interviews various mental health experts about what assistance is available.

Gavin Dahl

  • Local newspapers decline while partisan online news sites thrive
  • More Americans are falling behind on mortgage payments
  • Near Cortez, plans for a sustainable community "orchard hub"
  • Interview with U.S. Senator Michael Bennet

  • Delta-Montrose Electrical Association switches to Guzman Energy for its power supply, plans more renewables
  • Delta County School District deciding on plans for fall learning
  • Oregon Hotshot crew arrives to help fight Western Slope wildfires
  • RV and trailer sales climb as more people turn to camping during the pandemic

  • Green Meadows fire burning northwest of Telluride
  • Telluride-based software company expanding to Montrose, Grand Junction
  • COVID-19 testing delays and shortages hit communities
  • National Park Service is re-evaluating how it manages Yellowstone bison
  • Churches weigh how to best offer religious services during pandemic

  • Ridgway named third "Dark Sky Community" in Colorado
  • Wildfire smoke in summer leads to more flu outbreaks in winter, says new study
  • Bureau of Land Management struggles to fill headquarters jobs after moving to Grand Junction

  • Fire restrictions in place across Western Slope
  • Western utility looks to scale up its renewable power capacity
  • Majority of Mountain West residents think Trump is not handling the pandemic well
  • Lake Powell is essential to millions of people, but its water supply is declining sharply

  • New tool from CU-Boulder measures coronavirus transmission risk
  • Debunking the myth that the Irish were the most enslaved people in the U.S.
  • Colorado's rate of COVID-19 is climbing;  Western Slope case numbers
  • Interview with public health director about COVID-19 spike in Mineral County

  • Gov. Jared Polis visits Grand Junction, signs several bills into law
  • Violin vigil held in Grand Junction for victims of police brutality
  • Delta County extends state of emergency until August 5
  • Small business owners have until August 8 to apply for loans
  • Lake Powell filled for the first time 40 years ago this summer

  • Preliminary results from Tuesday's primary election
  • Gov. Polis urges Coloradans to avoid large 4th of July gatherings, closes bars and nightclubs for 30 days
  • Video games may help relieve stress

Mario Yordonov/Creative Commons

Mosquitoes aren't just annoying -- their bite can transmit diseases to humans and animals, including West Nile virus.

  • Federal aid during the COVID-19 pandemic has kept poverty rate from skyrocketing
  • Most Americans think the government should do more to reduce climate change impacts
  • Drought deepens across the West and Colorado
  • The pandemic has increased telehealth access -- will it continue?

  • An interview with Democrat K.C. Becker, Colorado's Speaker of the House
  • People of color in our region share their perspectives on racial injustice

  • New Grand Junction group works for racial equality
  • Vacation rental bookings rise sharply during pandemic
  • "Use it or lose it" -- Colorado notifying people in danger of losing unused water rights

  • Grand Valley faces another large layoff
  • Gov. Polis signs more bills to respond to pandemic
  • More people report symptoms of depression due to pandemic
  • 2021 state budget takes a big chunk out of public schools

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