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  • This week we hear from our Rocky Mountain Community Radio partner station KGNU's news director Shannon Young. She speaks with Vince Waldron, co-author of Be My Baby, a memoir by the late Ronnie Spector. The singer originally published her memoir in 1990, but updated it for a release which is hitting bookstores last month. Ronnie Spector unfortunately did not live to see the release of this latest version of her book. She died in January after a private battle with cancer. But her story lives on for a younger audience.
  • This week we hear from reporter Will Walkey at our RMCR partner station KHOL in Jackson about a controversy examining the very core of what it means for humans to interact with public lands. A small population of bighorn sheep persists in the Teton range during the winter under impossible conditions, often above 10,000 feet. Local wildlife biologists, who have been painstakingly tracking the population for decades, say the herd is in danger and are proposing backcountry closures to try and give the sheep some space. This effort to conserve the herd is pitting some skiers against conservationists in emotional public discourse. This podcast is part of a series from KHOL and Stio called Facets: Voices of the Mountain Life.
  • Stephanie Maltarich has covered climate action through creative entrepreneurship and net-zero affordable housing for KVNF and the Rocky Mountain Community Radio coalition. She’s covered the summer sockeye run for Alaska Public Radio and reported on ski safety for NPR's Weekend Edition. Her latest article on safer backcountry travel is out now in The Colorado Sun. Next, she's launching a new radio series called Headwaters.
  • Gavin Dahl speaks to Meg Franko, who authored a report in partnership with the Bell Policy Center in Denver called “Quality Child Care in Colorado: A Cost Study.” The research series illuminates the challenges and opportunities in one particularly dire area of critical infrastructure. KGNU’s Rossana Longo-Better reports for Rocky Mountain Community Radio on an effort to provide access to solar energy for mobile home residents in the City of Boulder with a unique solution: a Solar Garden.
  • You are vaccinated against COVID, but what if you lose your vaccine card? Laura Palmisano reports on what Colorado residents can do in this situation and also some options for proving vaccination status. Also, as the US transitions away from coal, many communities are looking to tourism to fill the economic gap left behind by a shuttered industry. Many other communities began that transition decades ago, and now are facing new challenges. KBUT’s Christopher Biddle reports there’s a new initiative in the Colorado Legislature to rewrite some of the rules of the post-coal economy.
  • KSJD's Lucas Brady Woods reports on a new forum for Western states and federal agencies to coordinate environmental conservation across borders and jurisdictions. Plus, the Town of Paonia got a stark look at their troubled water systems last week from the contractor they hired to take over for the recently resigned Public Works Director Travis Loberg.
  • Today we continue our four-part series honoring the teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh.
  • This week on Local Motion we get updates from Indian Country thanks to our Rocky Mountain Community Radio partners at KSUT Tribal Radio in the Four Corners. Poet Laureate and musician Joy Harjo speaks with host Crystal Ashike and reporter Sarah Flower interviews Dr. Loretta Christensen, chief medical officer of the Indian Health Service, about the impacts of coronavirus on Native families, and how tribal nations prepared for the omicron surge.
  • This week on Local Motion we get updates from Indian Country thanks to our Rocky Mountain Community Radio partners at KSUT Tribal Radio in the Four Corners. Poet Laureate and musician Joy Harjo speaks with host Crystal Ashike and reporter Sarah Flower interviews Dr. Loretta Christensen, chief medical officer of the Indian Health Service, about the impacts of coronavirus on Native families, and how tribal nations prepared for the omicron surge.
  • As the old saying goes, whiskey is for drinking and water is for fighting over. Sometimes that struggle gets personal. Kate Redmond reports on the slaughter of beavers who dam up irrigation in Crawford. Plus several Colorado lawmakers are working from home this week. But party leaders cannot say whether the higher rate of virtual participation is because of a COVID outbreak at the Capitol. Scott Franz reports.