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Capitol Coverage

  • The Town of Paonia will bring on a new company to draw up plans for an overhaul of the town’s water system. Kate Redmond reports. Plus, with Colorado candidates making unfounded voter fraud allegations the central theme of campaigns, election workers are worried. As Scott Franz reports, county clerks are embracing new tools to assure residents about the integrity of the vote.
  • Third congressional district primary candidates are meeting tonight at 6 at a forum hosted by the League of Women Voters of Colorado. Lucas Brady Woods sits down with the League’s president, Karen Sheek. Plus, Scott Franz reports some Colorado lawmakers say they want to pass new laws promoting abortion access if the U.S. Supreme Court strikes down federal protections.
  • Ballots for Colorado’s upcoming primary election are being mailed out starting today. As Scott Franz reports, voters also face a deadline today to switch their party affiliation. Plus, some states will quickly restrict abortion if Roe versus Wade is overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court. The Mountain West News Bureau’s Robyn Vincent reports the fight to preserve abortion access in our region reflects a divided nation.
  • Congressmember Lauren Boebert and State Senator Don Coram clashed in a Republican primary debate in Ignacio on Thursday. The wide-ranging forum included personal attacks and calls to arm school teachers. KSUT's Mark Duggan reports. Plus, Grand Junction Sentinel reporter Charles Ashby attended a CD3 candidate forum on Wednesday hosted by the Mesa County Democratic Party. He writes the candidates, Sol Sandoval, Alex Walker, and Adam Frisch spent more time attacking Boebert than each other.
  • A new Interior Department report is sharply critical of the Indian boarding school system used as a tool to assimilate indigenous people during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Lucas Brady Woods reports. Plus, Coloradans are on edge as climate change is fueling bigger, more destructive fires. Some forecasters say things could get worse this summer than they’ve ever been. Scott Franz reports for Capitol Coverage.
  • Adam Frisch is one of three Democrats on the June primary ballot for the Third Congressional District hoping to challenge Republican Lauren Boebert in the November election. Over the weekend he kicked off his Beat Boebert BBQ Tour with stops at nearly a dozen restaurants from Pueblo to Grand Junction. Unfortunately, campaign manager Sarah Shook tells KVNF tensions arose at a variety of stops with a law enforcement response necessary in Trinidad and visits to multiple locations moved after restaurants allegedly received violent threats from Boebert supporters. Plus, Colorado lawmakers have passed a bill they say includes the most money they have ever spent on affordable housing projects. As Scott Franz reports, it creates a first of its kind loan program to help jumpstart new developments.
  • The precipitous drop in Lake Mead is a wake-up call about the dire nature of the aridification of the west. Kate Redmond speaks with Sinjin Erberle, Southwest communications director for American Rivers about the future of the Colorado River Basin. Plus, Colorado lawmakers are on the verge of passing a bill to address a spike in fentanyl overdose deaths. As Scott Franz reports for Capitol Coverage, the senate is rejecting a push from prosecutors to make possessing small amounts a felony.
  • Hotchkiss artist Ira Houseweart talks about his recent appearance on national TV. Plus, Capitol Coverage reporter Scott Franz heads to Steamboat Springs, a town on the frontlines of the housing crisis, and reports how state lawmakers plan to help.
  • Hotchkiss artist Ira Houseweart talks about his recent appearance on national TV. Plus, Capitol Coverage reporter Scott Franz heads to Steamboat Springs, a town on the frontlines of the housing crisis, and reports how state lawmakers plan to help.
  • Colorado has been collecting more taxes than it can legally spend in recent years. As Scott Franz reports, Gov. Jared Polis and Democratic lawmakers are planning to send out $400 refunds this summer. Then, trails around Paonia and other recreational amenities are coming to fruition. Kate Redmond shares an update on the Paonia In Motion initiative. Plus, spending on dietary supplements has jumped dramatically during the pandemic. The Mountain West News Bureau looks into what’s driving the demand, and what concerns it raises for healthcare providers.