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Colorado River

  • KVNF's Regional Newscast for September 29, 2022 featured news from the town of Paonia and two special reports including K-U-N-C’s Scott Franz at the capitol and KUNC’s Alex Hager on the ongoing crisis along the Colorado River. Today's feature story highlighted the first annual Delta Pride celebration over the weekend.
  • Delta County Sheriff’s Office and multiple assisting agencies continue searching for missing duck hunter Wayne Phillips who was last seen about three weeks ago, reports the Montrose Daily Press. Hundreds of lives were possibly saved last week. The Delta Police Department seized 123 suspected fentanyl pills from a shoplifter at Clubb's Variety Store in Delta, reports the Delta County Independent. In response to the growing concern about drugs and crime, the Delta Police Department will host a town hall event at 6pm on Thursday, Jan. 12, at Bill Heddles Recreation Center. Lawmakers gathered at the state Capitol Monday for the start of the 2023 legislative session. Democrats hold strong majorities in both the House and the Senate.
  • Delta County Assessor Debbie Griffith. The Colorado Assessors’ Association honored Griffith as the 2022 Colorado Assessor of the Year at its annual conference held earlier this month. Delta-Montrose Electric Association has appointed Jack Johnston as the cooperative’s new CEO. The Montrose Municipal Court located on South Cascade Avenue will be temporarily relocating to the Montrose Public Safety Complex at 434 South First Street for up to three months due to renovations. State and federal officials are warning horse owners not to feed their animals Top of the Rockies brand alfalfa cubes after nearly 100 horses developed neurologic illnesses. The Colorado River is in crisis. Forty million people depend on its water, and the supply is shrinking due to climate change. Policymakers met in Las Vegas last week to discuss its future, but didn’t emerge with any new commitments to significantly cut back demand. That leaves hydropower facilities in jeopardy at the nation’s largest reservoirs, and a murky picture of the river’s future.
  • Conditions on the Colorado River are worsening quicker than expected, reports the Denver Post. The seven states in the river basin made little progress saving water over the summer. Colorado Parks and Wildlife is looking for support from the community in identifying the person who illegally killed a desert bighorn sheep off Highway 141 between Gateway and Grand Junction. A new Colorado law seems to be increasing access to medical care for people who suffer from a condition known as gender dysphoria. A researcher in our region is analyzing a new way to grow vegetables and flowers using roof top space.
  • The first annual Delta Pride celebration held at Cleland Park last Saturday was filled with anticipation, excitement and raw emotions. Paonia’s Town Clerk resigned following months of criticism, reports the Delta County Independent. Corinne Ferguson, who also served as town administrator, said she will depart at the end of the year. As the Colorado River dries up, our region is searching for ways to prop up to the water supply. Some are looking to the ocean.
  • Erin Easton, host of KVNF's Mindful Moments, stopped by Studio M to talk about the new nonprofit she just launched called Healing Collective of Western Colorado. Plus, the snow that supplies most of the water to local rivers is melting. KUNC’s Alex Hager shares a preview of what to expect this summer in the Colorado River basin.
  • As Earth Day is celebrated across the globe today, we continue inching toward a tipping point where reversing the climb of greenhouse gasses in the environment may no longer be possible. Some corporations and organizations respond by using carbon offsets. But a group of locals is digging their hands in the dirt to not only act locally and think globally, but also engage in a practical response. Kate Redmond reports. Plus, Colorado lawmakers are unveiling another effort to help survivors of natural disasters like wildfires rebuild their homes, creating a new grant program and a new government office.
  • As Earth Day is celebrated across the globe today, we continue inching toward a tipping point where reversing the climb of greenhouse gasses in the environment may no longer be possible. Some corporations and organizations respond by using carbon offsets. But a group of locals is digging their hands in the dirt to not only act locally and think globally, but also engage in a practical response. Kate Redmond reports. Plus, Colorado lawmakers are unveiling another effort to help survivors of natural disasters like wildfires rebuild their homes, creating a new grant program and a new government office.
  • As the Colorado River shrinks, there’s a lot on the line: water that supplies 40 million people throughout the southwest, plus farms, wildlife, and hydropower at the nation’s largest reservoirs. The federal agency that deals the most with the Colorado River is the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. David Arend is the new deputy regional director for the lower basin. He’s worked for the agency for 20 years, most recently overseeing hydropower. He spoke with Alex Hager about some of the biggest issues going forward.
  • As the Colorado River shrinks, there’s a lot on the line: water that supplies 40 million people throughout the southwest, plus farms, wildlife, and hydropower at the nation’s largest reservoirs. The federal agency that deals the most with the Colorado River is the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. David Arend is the new deputy regional director for the lower basin. He’s worked for the agency for 20 years, most recently overseeing hydropower. He spoke with Alex Hager about some of the biggest issues going forward.