mental health

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Explore the role of flexibility in our well-being. Flexilbility and openness creates strength because they allow us to work with life, rather than fight against it. 

Local Motion: Sen. Don Coram & Sen. Kerry Donovan

May 12, 2021

This week's Local Motion features reporter Laura Palmisano's unfiltered conversations with Republican State Senator Don Coram and Democratic State Senator Kerry Donovan about the busy legislative session, and bills they've sponsored that the Governor has signed into law so far. Plus, news director Gavin Dahl reviews the Local Motion programs that won awards from the Colorado Broadcasters Association and Society of Professional Journalists.

  

  • Ridgway Concert Series approved for 5 Thursdays in July
  • Aspen dropping outdoor mask mandate
  • Colorado removing pejorative language from state contracts
  • Restrictions eased on medication effective for treating opioid addiction 
  • Kathleen Burnell from the Center for Mental Health talks about why deaths of despair, from drug overdoses and suicides, are an epidemic within the pandemic

  

Briana May / KGNU

  • Gov. Polis expects Colorado will continue Johnson & Johnson vaccines soon
  • Montrose approves incentives, tax increment financing loan for new Colorado Yurt Company HQ
  • Sen. Hickenlooper hosts first town hall since being elected tonight at 6
  • New bill at statehouse seeks to give Colorado youth free access to mental health services
  • Moms and Students Demand Action for Gun Sense gathered at Boulder's municipal building Monday, urging legislation to implement more robust background checks on gun purchases

  

RawPixel.com

Part 3 of 3: Coming back home to the body. How to identify the true needs of the body. 

RawPixel.com

Part 2 of 3 in a series about being mindful of the body. Looking at the ways we neglect or turn away from the body. We live in a society that requires us to keep going even if our body is telling us to slow down.

  

RawPixel.com

Part 3 of 3  No Mud No Lotus.

Theres no better time then now, to pay attention to why we do things, as we take a look at being mindful of our intentions.

Gavin Dahl

A unique collaboration between the Center for Mental Health and local law enforcement agencies offers frontline intervention to help diffuse conflicts for those experiencing a mental health crisis. Now the Montrose Police Department has acquired a brand new vehicle for the co-responder through state grant funds which is expected to have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the program. KVNF's Gavin Dahl spoke to Chief Clinical Officer Amanda Jones and Montrose Police commander Matt Smith to learn more.

 

Gavin Dahl

  • Montrose High School now a COVID outbreak site
  • Colorado Mesa University stays open with routine testing
  • 4 staff of Grand Junction Utilities department test positive
  • Thefts from parked cars in Mesa County are up, with 95 guns stolen since January 1st
  • Center for Mental Health says a new vehicle will make their partnership with Montrose Police even more effective

Alexander Andreev - Creative Commons

This encore edition of Local Motion focuses on mental health. Originally aired Sept. 24, 2019, it was updated in July 2020 with information about mental health issues during the pandemic. Many Western Slope residents struggle with depression, anxiety, substance abuse and even thoughts of suicide. The Surgeon General of the U.S. has said that one in four people experiences some form of mental illness, and the rates of those illnesses are highest in the American West. KVNF's Jodi Peterson interviews various mental health experts about what assistance is available.

It’s no secret that the COVID-19 pandemic, and the anxiety and economic difficulties it’s causing are affecting our state of mind. Kaiser Family Foundation reports that nearly half of adults across the country say that worry, stress and depression related to the coronavirus are hurting their mental health.

Dream Catcher Therapy Center

KVNF explores Equine-Assisted Therapy aka "Horse Therapy" at Dream Catcher Therapy Center in Olathe, CO. The therapy center houses over 50 rescued horses and works hand-in-hand with End of the Trail Rescue which rescues horses and cares for them until "the end of their lives." Equine therapy offers a different approach to trauma related therapy as well as physical and mental health treatment. Therapy programs are offered to ages two and up.

Alexander Andreev - Creative Commons

This edition of Local Motion focuses on mental health. Many Western Slope residents struggle with depression, anxiety, substance abuse and even thoughts of suicide. The Surgeon General of the U.S. has said that one in four people experiences some form of mental illness, and the rates of those illnesses are highest in the American West. Fortunately, resources ranging from therapists to treatment centers are available in many communities.  KVNF's Jodi Peterson interviews various mental health experts about what assistance is out there.

The man who acknowledged attacking a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado last year is not competent to have his criminal case go forward, a judge ruled on Wednesday. Robert Lewis Dear Jr. is accused of killing three people and wounding nine others in Colorado Springs in November.

On April 20, 1999, when Sue Klebold heard about a shooting incident at Columbine High School, her thoughts immediately turned to her 17-year-old son, Dylan, who was a senior there.

"In the very beginning, I didn't know what to think," Sue tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "I was aware that there was a shooting incident occurring at the school. I didn't know if Dylan was in danger, if someone was trying to shoot him, if he was doing something."

Staff Sgt. Eric James, an Army sniper who served two tours in Iraq, paused before he walked into a psychiatrist's office at Fort Carson, Colo. It was April 3, 2014. James clicked record on his smartphone, and then tucked the phone and his car keys inside his cap as he walked through the door to the chair by the therapist's desk.

KVNF Regional Newscast: Friday, Aug. 21, 2015

Aug 21, 2015

  • Hickenlooper visits Montrose, talks about river spill
  • Study looks at methane emissions from natural gas development
  • Street mural tries to create a place for community
  • Mental health resources strained across Colorado
  • Grand Junction horse show canceled over livetsock disease fears

For Whitney Bischoff, high school was tough. On the first day of her freshman year, a childhood friend committed suicide. Things weren't any better at home — her father died when she was 7 and her mom was an alcoholic with an abusive boyfriend.

She had a hard time making friends.

And when all the stress threatened to overwhelm her, she, too, considered suicide.

"I thought family was everything," Bischoff says. "I thought, if I didn't have family support – what am I going to do? Suicide seemed like the only way out."

It's been two and a half years since the Aurora, Colo. theater shooting in which James Holmes allegedly killed 12 people at a screening of The Dark Knight Rises.

Jury selection for the 2012 incident is scheduled to start Tuesday. One of the reasons why it took so long to get to court was the battle over Holmes' psychiatric evaluations. After the shooting, Colorado legislators approved $20 million to change how people going through a mental health crisis can get help.