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Drought

  • The Interior Department is spending nearly 85-million-dollars to help communities in the West tackle challenges brought on by drought. According to the most recent Colorado SNOWTEL report, the Gunnison River Basin is at 139% of normal with the Yampa and White River Basin at 150% of normal. The first snow system of the new year brought in varying amounts of snow fall. Higher elevation did better with Silverton - 13.5 inches ,and Monarch Pass - 10 inches. Durango and Cedaredge reported 5 inches, and surprisingly Telluride reported only an inch and a half of snow. The 2022 mid-term elections weren’t the best for Colorado Republicans as Democrats retained top state positions and once again took the majority in both houses. In our final report from Rep. Matt Soper, he talks about the party’s losses and what that means for the upcoming legislative session which gets underway Monday.
  • Gavin Dahl speaks with author and environmental journalist Laura Paskus about her book At the Precipice: New Mexico’s Changing Climate. Plus, Writers on the Range publisher David Marston shares his suggestions for a new code of the West.
  • Erin Easton, host of KVNF's Mindful Moments, stopped by Studio M to talk about the new nonprofit she just launched called Healing Collective of Western Colorado. Plus, the snow that supplies most of the water to local rivers is melting. KUNC’s Alex Hager shares a preview of what to expect this summer in the Colorado River basin.
  • DART, the City of Montrose Development and Revitalization Team, earned the Governor’s Award for Downtown Excellence for what the city calls Block 64, anchored by Chow Down Pet Supplies and San Juan Brews. KVNF attended a celebration Thursday. Plus, the federal government’s pandemic response program to fund free school meals for all students is set to expire at the end of June. KGNU's Shannon Young reports.
  • The precipitous drop in Lake Mead is a wake-up call about the dire nature of the aridification of the west. Kate Redmond speaks with Sinjin Erberle, Southwest communications director for American Rivers about the future of the Colorado River Basin. Plus, Colorado lawmakers are on the verge of passing a bill to address a spike in fentanyl overdose deaths. As Scott Franz reports for Capitol Coverage, the senate is rejecting a push from prosecutors to make possessing small amounts a felony.
  • As Earth Day is celebrated across the globe today, we continue inching toward a tipping point where reversing the climb of greenhouse gasses in the environment may no longer be possible. Some corporations and organizations respond by using carbon offsets. But a group of locals is digging their hands in the dirt to not only act locally and think globally, but also engage in a practical response. Kate Redmond reports. Plus, Colorado lawmakers are unveiling another effort to help survivors of natural disasters like wildfires rebuild their homes, creating a new grant program and a new government office.
  • As Earth Day is celebrated across the globe today, we continue inching toward a tipping point where reversing the climb of greenhouse gasses in the environment may no longer be possible. Some corporations and organizations respond by using carbon offsets. But a group of locals is digging their hands in the dirt to not only act locally and think globally, but also engage in a practical response. Kate Redmond reports. Plus, Colorado lawmakers are unveiling another effort to help survivors of natural disasters like wildfires rebuild their homes, creating a new grant program and a new government office.
  • A new study from the U.S. Forest Service shows that existing water conservation efforts might not be enough to meet demand in the future, as climate change causes drought to be more severe. KUNC’s Alex Hager will bring us that story.The League of Women Voters sponsored a webinar which welcomed Jeff Roberts, Executive Director of the Freedom Of Information Coalition. He brought some specific examples of school boards who seek to circumvent Open Meeting and Sunshine Laws.
  • A new study from the U.S. Forest Service shows that existing water conservation efforts might not be enough to meet demand in the future, as climate change causes drought to be more severe. KUNC’s Alex Hager will bring us that story.The League of Women Voters sponsored a webinar which welcomed Jeff Roberts, Executive Director of the Freedom Of Information Coalition. He brought some specific examples of school boards who seek to circumvent Open Meeting and Sunshine Laws.
  • Looking at drought maps in 2021 it was striking to see that the areas in Colorado and in California that are under the most intensive tillage also were suffering from the most extreme drought. Could there be a relationship?