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Lauren Boebert

  • The race between Lauren Boebert and Adam Frisch was the most expensive 2022 Colorado congressional contest per vote cast, reports the Colorado Sun. Boebert spent nearly $43 per vote, while Frisch spent $32. State Rep. Marc Catlin, Republican from Montrose, has been appointed to the Capital Development Committee, reports the Montrose Daily Press. Sentencing for a former Montrose mortician and her mother will take place on January 3rd, despite two attempts to delay the procedure, reports the Montrose Daily Press. Megan Hess and Shirley Koch were convicted of mail fraud in a scheme involving human remains. Protesters across the country demanding that US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack revoke permits for the Uinta Basin Railway—an 88-mile railroad that would connect oil fields in Utah to existing rail lines. New forecasts for the Colorado River paint a grim picture. Climate change and steady demand are shrinking the water supply for 40 million people.
  • After a brief hiatus KVNF Regional Newscasts will now air on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.Delta County Dispatch received a call on Tuesday, September 20 regarding an active shooter in progress at Delta and Cedaredge High Schools. The information was deemed to be untrue. The Colorado Secretary of State’s Office is investigating whether Garfield County Sheriff Lou Vallario broke campaign finance laws by using public resources to support U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert. Delta-Montrose Electric Association will conduct aerial line inspections across its service area next Wednesday. Citizens may see and hear the low flying helicopter during the inspection process.
  • Potter Bill Wilson joins Gavin Dahl at Studio M to reflect on decades making art in Montrose and talk about his next chapter, moving to Manitou Springs to spend more time with his grandkids. Plus, 11 percent of Colorado kids live in poverty. Kaleb Roedel reports for the Mountain West News Bureau.
  • Congressmember Lauren Boebert and State Senator Don Coram clashed in a Republican primary debate in Ignacio on Thursday. The wide-ranging forum included personal attacks and calls to arm school teachers. KSUT's Mark Duggan reports. Plus, Grand Junction Sentinel reporter Charles Ashby attended a CD3 candidate forum on Wednesday hosted by the Mesa County Democratic Party. He writes the candidates, Sol Sandoval, Alex Walker, and Adam Frisch spent more time attacking Boebert than each other.
  • It's been a hard couple of years. Many people are struggling with mental health or addictions. Kate Redmond speaks with Kathleen Burnell, a Center for Mental Health clinician in the area, who offers an innovative program. Plus, Eric Galatas reports Colorado officials say now is the time to prepare for wildfires in your neighborhood.
  • Over 100 people rallied in Montrose on Saturday, demonstrating support for women's autonomy in response to a controversial draft Supreme Court decision leaked to the news outlet Politico signaling the high court is poised to overturn Roe V. Wade. Kate Redmond reports. Plus, PFAS chemicals are in some ski waxes, which then get into the environment, groundwater and even our bodies, causing health issues. The Mountain West News Bureau’s Madelyn Beck reports on one local source to get rid of that wax.
  • Adam Frisch is one of three Democrats on the June primary ballot for the Third Congressional District hoping to challenge Republican Lauren Boebert in the November election. Over the weekend he kicked off his Beat Boebert BBQ Tour with stops at nearly a dozen restaurants from Pueblo to Grand Junction. Unfortunately, campaign manager Sarah Shook tells KVNF tensions arose at a variety of stops with a law enforcement response necessary in Trinidad and visits to multiple locations moved after restaurants allegedly received violent threats from Boebert supporters. Plus, Colorado lawmakers have passed a bill they say includes the most money they have ever spent on affordable housing projects. As Scott Franz reports, it creates a first of its kind loan program to help jumpstart new developments.
  • Adam Frisch is one of three Democrats on the June primary ballot for the Third Congressional District hoping to challenge Republican Lauren Boebert in the November election. Over the weekend he kicked off his Beat Boebert BBQ Tour with stops at nearly a dozen restaurants from Pueblo to Grand Junction. Unfortunately, tensions arose at a variety of stops with a law enforcement response necessary in Trinidad and visits in Pueblo, Montrose, and Grand Junction were moved after restaurants allegedly received threats from Boebert supporters. Sarah Shook is campaign manager for candidate Adam Frisch.
  • The precipitous drop in Lake Mead is a wake-up call about the dire nature of the aridification of the west. Kate Redmond speaks with Sinjin Erberle, Southwest communications director for American Rivers about the future of the Colorado River Basin. Plus, Colorado lawmakers are on the verge of passing a bill to address a spike in fentanyl overdose deaths. As Scott Franz reports for Capitol Coverage, the senate is rejecting a push from prosecutors to make possessing small amounts a felony.
  • At different points throughout the year, it may feel like your whole state or all of the Mountain West is on fire. But officials say that during times of increased fire danger, they have a plan. Emma Gibson of the Mountain West News Bureau reports. Plus, Cassie Knust, reporter for the Delta County Independent and the Montrose Press, summarizes what she learned about the four candidates running for three seats on the North Fork Recreation District board.